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Catalogue and General Bulletin 
Joint Graduate Studies Program 

AVANNAH STATE COLLEGE and ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 
1974-1975 



BULLETIN 

of 

THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

OF 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE - ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 
Units of the University System of Georgia 
1974-1975 



Armstrong State College and Savannah State College are in 
compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and do not 
iiscriminate on the basis of sex, race, creed, or national origin. 



CONTENTS 



Academic Calendar — 1974-75 4 

Governing Board and Staff of 

the University System of Georgia 6 

Administrative Officers of the 

Joint Graduate Studies Program 7 

Heads of the Graduate Departments 7 

The Graduate Council 8 

The Graduate Faculty 9 

History, Purpose, and Organization 15 

Fees, Refunds, and Financial Assistance 17 

Admission to Graduate Study 20 

Academic Regulations 24 

Degrees and General Degree Requirements 28 

Departments: Programs and Courses 31 

Business Administration 32 

M.B.A. Program 

M.Ed., Business Education 

Biology 45 

M.Ed., Biology 

Chemistry 52 

M.Ed., Chemistry 

Education 56 

M.Ed., Elementary Education 

M.Ed., Special Education — Behavior Disorders 

English 66 

M.Ed., English 

History and Political Science 71 

M.Ed., History 

M.Ed., Political Science 

Mathematics 85 

M.Ed., Mathematics 

Index 93 



• 


CALENDAR FOR 1974 


• 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


13 141516171819 


14151617181920 


14151617181920 


13141516171819 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 31 


28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


1 2 


12 3 4 


1 2 3 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


1011 1213141516 


12131415161718 


11 121314151617 


1011 1213141516 


17 1819 20 2122 23 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


171819 20 2122 23 


24 25 26 27 28 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 2 


1 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 1011 121314 


8 9 1011 121314 


1011 1213141516 


9 1011 12131415 


15 1617181920 21 


15 1617181920 21 


17 1819 20 2122 23 


16 17181920 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 


29 3031 


31 


30 







• 


CALENDAR FOR 197S 


• 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


12131415161718 


13141516171819 


13141516171819 


12131415161718 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


1 


1 2 3 


1 2 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 1011 12131415 


11 121314151617 


1011 1213141516 


9 1011 12131415 


16171819 20 2122 


1819 20 2122 23 24 


171819 20 2122 23 


1617 1819 20 2122 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 






31 


30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 1011 121314 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


9 1011 12131415 


151617181920 21 


14151617181920 


14151617181920 


16171819 20 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 


28 2930 


28 29 3031 


30 31 









ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1974-1975 
SUMMER QUARTER, 1974 



April 


15. 


Last day to file applications for graduation at 
end of Summer Quarter. 


June 


10. 


Registration. 




11. 


Classes begin. 




12. 


Last day to register for credit. 


July 


4. 


Holiday. 




8. 


Mid-term reports. 




8. 


Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 


August 


5. 


Last day of classes. 




7-9. 


Examinations. 




8. 


Graduation. 
FALL QUARTER, 1974 


September 


16-20. 


Faculty available for advising. 




19-20. 


Registration. 




23. 


Classes begin. 




24. 


Last day to register for credit. 


October 


30. 


Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 




30. 


Mid-term reports. 


November 


28-29. 


Thanksgiving Holidays (begin at 12:30 P.M. on 
November 27). 


December 


2. 


Last day of classes. 




4-6. 


Examinations. 




9. 


Christmas vacation begins. 
WINTER QUARTER, 1975 


January 


2. 


Registration. 




6. 


Classes begin. 




7. 


Last day to register for credit. 




31. 


Last day to file application for graduation at end 
of Spring Quarter. 


February 


5. 


Mid-term reports. 




5. 


Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 


March 


10. 


Last day of classes. 




12-14. 


Examinations. 




17-21. 


Spring recess. 



March 


24 




25 




26 


April 


15 




24 




24 


May 


30 


June 


3-5 




5 


June 


13. 




16. 




17. 


July 


4. 




14. 




14. 


August 


7. 




11-13. 




13. 


September 16-19. 




22-23. 




24. 




25. 




24. 


October 


24. 


November 


27-28. 


December 


4. 




8-10. 




11. 



SPRING QUARTER, 1975 

Registration. 

Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit. 

Last day to file application for graduation at end 

of Summer Quarter. 

Mid-term reports. 

Last day to withdraw from class with grade of 

W. 

Last day of classes. 

Examinations. 

Graduation. 

SUMMER QUARTER, 1975 

Registration. 

Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit. 

Holiday 

Last day to withdraw from class with grade of 

W. 

Mid-term reports due. 

Last day of classes. 

Examinations. 

Graduation. 

FALL QUARTER, 1975 

Faculty available for advising. 

Registration. 

Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit. 

Last day to withdraw from class with grade of 

W. 

Mid-term reports due. 

Thanksgiving Holidays (Begin at 12:30 P.M. on 

November 26.) 

Last day of classes. 

Examinations. 

Christmas Vacation begins. 



GOVERNING BOARD, 
ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES A HARRIS, Chairman Ocilla 

JOHN A. BELL, JR., Vice Chairman Dublin 

W. LEE BURGE Atlanta 

JESSE HILL, JR Atlanta 

MILTON JONES Columbus 

JAMES D. MADDOX Rome 

MRS. HUGH PETERSON, SR Alley 

JOHN R. RICHARDSON Conyers 

JOHN H. ROBINSON, III Americus 

P. R. SMITH Winder 

JOHN I. SPOONER Donalsonville 

DAVID H. TISINGER Carrollton 

SAM A. WAY, III Hawkinsville 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 

STAFF OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR Chancellor 

JOHN O. EIDSON Vice Chancellor 

JOHN W. HOOPER Associate Vice Chancellor 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretary 

SHEALY E. McCOY Vice Chancellor-Fiscal 

Affairs and Treasurer 

JAMES E. BOYD Vice Chancellor 

Academic Development 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Vice Chancellor-Construction 

and Physical Plant 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor-Research 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR Vice Chancellor-Services 

HARRY B. O'REAR Vice Chancellor-Health Affairs 

JAMES L. CARMON Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Computing Systems 

HASKIN R. POUNDS Assistant Vice Chancellor 

MRS. HUBERT L. HARRIS Assistant Vice Chancellor-Personnel 

ROBERT M. JOINER Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Communications 

HARRY H. MURPHY, JR director of Public Information 

C. C. MURRAY Director, Interinstitutional Programs 

in International Affairs 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF 
THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

SA V ANN AH STATE COLLEGE ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

President 
Prince A. Jackson, Jr. Henry L. Ashmore 

Dean of the College 
Thomas H. Byers H. Dean Propst 

Associate Dean for Graduate Studies 
James A. Eaton Joseph V. Adams 

Comptroller 
Prince Mitchell Jule R. Stanfield 

Registrar 
Rollan Henry, Jr. George Hunnicutt 

Librarian 
Andrew J. McLemore George Sloan 



HEADS OF THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENTS 

?A V ANN AH STA TE COLLEGE ARMSTR ONG STA TE COLLEGE 

Biology 
Margaret C. Robinson Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. 

Business Administration 
Mary C. Torian Orange W. Hall 

Chemistry 
Willie G. Tucker Henry E. Harris 

Education 
Thelma H. Harmond William W. Stokes 

English 
Luetta C. Milledge Hugh Pendexter, III 

Mathematics 
John B. Clemmons Richard M. Summerville 

History and Political Science 
Slmer J. Dean Roger K. Warlick 



THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

1973-1974 

The members of the Graduate Council for 1973-74 include, in 
addition to the Presidents, Deans, Librarians and Heads of Graduate 
Departments named above, the graduate faculty members and 
graduate students listed below: 

Hayward Anderson, representing the Business Administration 

faculty. 
Alexander Beltz, representing the Biology faculty. 
Manchery Menon, representing the Chemistry faculty. 
Gerard F. Lentini, representing the Education faculty. 
Oscar Daub, representing the English faculty. 
Ross Clark, representing the History and Political Science 

faculty. 
Charles Lahr, representing the Mathematics faculty. 
Theodore Brown, President, Graduate Student Government 

Association. 
David Foye, Vice President, Graduate Student Government 

Association. 
Mary Amis, elected graduate student representative. 



u n 











GRADUATE FACULTY 

JOHN C. ADAMS, Ed.D., Florida State University 

Education (SSC) 

STEPHEN AGYEKUM, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Education (SSC) 

HAYWARD ANDERSON, D.B.A., Harvard University 
Business Administration (SSC) 

INEZ R. BACON, Ph.D., Howard University 

Biology (SSC) 

ADELINE BARBER, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Education (SSC) 

ALEX D. BELTZ, Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Biology (ASC) 

JIMMY B. BENSON, Ph.D., Cornell University 

Biology (SSC) 

SARVAN K. BHATIA, Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Business Administration (ASC) 

BLANTON BLACK, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Political Science (SSC) 

WILLIE S. BLACK, Ph.D., Chicago State University 

Mathematics (SSC) 

JOHN BREWER, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Chemistry (ASC) 

CLIFFORD BURGIS, Ed.D., Auburn University 

Education (SSC) 

THOMAS H. BYERS, Ph.D., Ball State University 

Political Science (SSC) 

O. CARVER BYRD, Ph.D., Georgia State University 
Business Administration (SSC) 

ROSS L. CLARK, Ph.D., Tulane University 

Political Science (ASC) 



JOHN COCHRAN, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Education (SSC) 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, Ph.D., Florida State University 

Political Science (ASC) 

OSCAR C. DAUB, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

English (SSC) 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Biology (ASC) 

ELMER J. DEAN, Ed.D., Columbia University 

History and Political Science (SSC) 

JOHN DUNCAN, Ph.D., Emory University 

History (ASC) 

THOMAS R. EASON, Ph.D., University of Mississippi 
Business Administration (ASC) 

JAMES A. EATON, Ed.D., Columbia University 

Education (SSC) 

JACOB ENGLEHARDT, Ph.D., New York University 

Mathematics (SSC) 

IDA J. GADSDEN, Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Education (SSC) 

JIMMIE F. GROSS, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

History (ASC) 

ORANGE HALL, Ph.D., University of Florida 

Business Administration (ASC) 

THELMA M. HARMOND, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Education (SSC) 

JOHN R. HANSEN, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Mathematics (ASC) 

HENRY E. HARRIS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Chemistry 

LAWRENCE HARRIS, Ph.D., University Santo Tomos, Manilla 

History (SSC) 

10 



JOHN S. HINKEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Mathematics (ASC) 

ANNE L. HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University 

Mathematics (ASC) 

SIGMUND HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University 

Mathematics (SSC) 

FRISSELL R. HUNTER, Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

Biology (SSC) 

JEFFREY JAMES, Ph.D., Howard University 

Chemistry (SSC) 

ELIZABETH B. JOHNS, Ph.D., Emory University 

English (SSC) 

MAX T. JOHNS, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Business Administration (SSC) 

JAMES L. JONES, Ph.D., Tulane University 

English (ASC) 

DALE Z. KILHEFNER, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Mathematics (ASC) 

JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, Ph.D., Columbia University 

English (ASC) 

PULLABHOTIA V. KRISHNAMURTI, Ph.D., Texas A. and M. 

University 

Biology (SSC) 

C. DWIGHT LAHR, Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Mathematics (SSC) 

JOSEPH LANE, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Education (ASC) 

OSMOS LANIER, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

History (ASC) 

CORNELIA V. LAWSON, Ed.D., University of Arkansas 

Education (SSC) 



11 



GERARD F. LENTINI, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Education (ASC) 

ELIZABETH LUNZ, Ph.D., Tulane University 

English (SSC) 

JOHN McIVER, Ph.D., Loyola University 

History (SSC) 

MICHAEL K. MAHER, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

English (SSC) 

JOHN C. MCCARTHY, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Political Science (ASC) 

MANCHERY P. MENON, Ph.D., University of Arkansas 

Chemistry (SSC) 

LUETTA C. MILLEDGE, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

English (SSC) 

RICHARD E. MUNSON, Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Mathematics (ASC) 

K. G. NAMBIAR, Ph.D., Texas A. & M. University 

Biology (SSC) 

JAMES S. NETHERTON, Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Mathematics (ASC) 

S. LLOYD NEWBERRY, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Education (ASC) 

JOHN F. NEWMAN, Ph.D., University of Florida 

Political Science (ASC) 

GEORGE O. O'NEILL, Ph.D. University of Southern California 

English (SSC) 

ROBERT M. PATTERSON, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

History (ASC) 

C. GLENN PEARCE, Ph.D., Georgia State University 
Business Education (ASC) 

HUGH PENDEXTER, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

English (ASC) 

12 



ALLEN L. PINGEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Biology (ASC) 

KAMALAKAR RAUT, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Chemistry 

THOMAS H. RENNIE, Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Biology (SSC) 

EMORY H. RICHARDS, Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Business Administration (ASC) 

PAUL E. ROBBINS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Chemistry (ASC) 

A. DORIS ROBINSON, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Education (SSC) 

MARGARET C. ROBINSON, Ph.D., Washington University 

Biology (SSC) 

HERMAN SARTOR, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Education (SSC) 

LEA L. SEALE, Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

English (ASC) 

CHARLES T. SHIPLEY, Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

Mathematics (ASC) 

RICHARD SIMENSEN, Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Education (ASC) 

JOHN E. SIMPSON, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

History (SSC) 

R. B. SINGH, Ph.D., Patna University 

Business Administration (SSC) 

STEVEN SMITH, Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

History (SSC) 

JACQUELYN STEPHENS, Ed.D., Florida State University 

Education (SSC) 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, Ed.D., University of Florida 

Education (ASC) 



13 



CEDRIC STRATTON, Ph.D., Birbeck College, London, England 

Chemistry (ASC) 

ROBERT I. STROZIER, Ph.D., Florida State University 

English (ASC) 

RICHARD SUMMERVILLE, Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Mathematics (ASC) 

JOSEPH W. SUMNER, Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Education (SSC) 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Biology (ASC) 

MARY C. TORIAN, Ph.D., New York University 
Business Administration (SSC) 

WILLIE G. TUCKER, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Chemistry (SSC) 

HANES WALTON, Ph.D., Howard University 

History (SSC) 

PAUL E. WARD, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Education (ASC) 

ROGER K. WARLICK, Ph.D., Boston University 

History (ASC) 

E. K. WILLIAMS, Ph.D., New York University 

History (SSC) 

BERNARD L. WOODHOUSE, Ph.D., Howard University 

Biology (SSC) 

THOMAS M. ZEPP, Ph.D., University of Florida 
Business Administration (ASC) 



14 



HISTORY PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION 



HISTORY 

Graduate Studies in Savannah were initiated at the beginning of 
the summer quarter 1968, when Savannah State College, with the 
approval of the Board of Regents, began offering courses leading to 
the degree of Master of Science in Elementary Education. The 
program operated as an independent program for thirteen quarters, 
enrolling well over two hundred students. It was approved by both 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Georgia 
State Board of Education. Seventy-five persons received Master's 
degrees under this program. 

Beginning with the fall quarter of 1971, Savannah State College 
joined with Armstrong State College to offer a joint program of 
graduate work. The combined faculties, library holdings, and 
facilities of the two colleges made possible the expansion of the 
graduate program to include a master's degree in business adminis- 
tration as well as the program in elementary education. In the spring 
of 1972, the Board of Regents approved the addition of secondary 
options in the Master of Education program. The Joint Graduate 
Studies Program has been fully accredited by the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools, with its degree programs in Education 
approved by the Georgia State Department of Education. 

PURPOSE 

The two colleges are aware of the large number of professional 
people in education and in business in the greater Savannah area and 
in the southeastern section of the country who are interested in 
continuing their professional development. The Joint Graduate 
Studies Program is dedicated to serving the needs of school teachers, 
and, through them, the children they serve. By offering advanced 
preparation to those who professionally serve in the public schools, 
the program hopes to aid in the development of teachers who possess 
the qualities of character, commitment, and professional promise. By 
offering advanced professional training in management and adminis- 
tration in a program leading to the degree of Master of Business 
Administration, the program prepares individuals for positions of 
responsibility in business, industry, government, and education. 



15 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Joint Graduate Studies Program is designed to insure the 
equal involvement of the two Colleges in the administration of the 
program and the instruction offered within the program. Students 
are required to take one-half of the courses in their degree programs 
at Savannah State College and one-half of the courses at Armstrong 
State College. The graduate degrees, bearing the signatures of both 
Presidents, are awarded jointly by the two Colleges. The location of 
the graduation ceremonies alternates between the two Colleges. 

The policy-making body for the Joint Graduate Studies Program is 
the Graduate Council. The Graduate Council consists of: the Deans 
of Graduate Studies of the two Colleges; the Department (or 
Division) Heads of those departments (or divisions) of the two 
Colleges which offer graduate programs; one graduate faculty 
member for each combined department (or division) of the two 
colleges offering a graduate program, this member being elected by 
the combined graduate faculty of the departments (divisions) 
concerned; the President and Vice President of the Graduate Student 
Government Association; and one graduate student elected by the 
GSGA. The Deans of the Colleges and the Presidents of the two 
colleges hold ex officio memberships on the Council. 

Programs are developed by the joint departmental faculties and 
approved by the Graduate Council for recommendation to the 
Presidents. The curriculum, the appointment of graduate faculty, the 
various academic policies (including policies on admissions, course 
credits, degree requirements, etc.) are acted on by the Graduate 
Council for recommendation to the Presidents. The combined 
resources of the academic departments and libraries and the campus 
facilities of the two Colleges are utilized in support of the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program. 

Administrative operations of the program are the responsibility of 
the two Graduate Deans and of the Department or Division Heads on 
the two campuses. Each of the Graduate Deans serves a two-year 
term, on an alternating basis, as the Coordinating Dean for Graduate 
Studies. The Heads of Departments or Divisions alternate on a yearly 
basis as Departmental Coordinators. The various administrative 
officers of the two Colleges give further support to the program. 



16 



FEES, REFUNDS, & 
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



Fees and refunds, with exceptions as noted below, may be 
processed with the Comptroller at either College, except fees for 
residential living costs at Savannah State College which must be 
processed through the Savannah State Comptroller. All fees are 
subject to change at the end of any quarter. 



APPLICATION FEE 

An application fee of $10.00 is paid by each graduate student at 
the time of initial application for admission. This fee is not required 
of graduates from either Armstrong State College or Savannah State 
College. The acceptance of the application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student into the graduate program. This fee, which 
is paid at Armstrong State College, is not refundable. 



MATRICULATION FEE 

The matriculation fee for part-time students is $9.75 per quarter 
lour; thus, the matriculation fee for one five (5) hour course is 
548.75. Students carrying 12 credit hours or more will pay $115.00 



OUT-OF-STATE TUITION 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $180.00 per quarter in 
iddition to all regular fees. Students carrying less than 12 credit 
lours in a quarter who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia 
vill pay at the rate of $14.00 per quarter hour for out-of-state 
uition in addition to matriculation fees. For residency requirements 
s established by the Board of Regents, see the Bulletin and General 
Catalogue of either Savannah State College or Armstrong State 
"ollege. 



ACTIVITY FEE 

All students enrolled for six hours or more must pay an Activity 
ee of $15.00 per quarter. 



17 



ATHLETIC FEE 
All students must pay an Athletic Fee of $5.00 per quarter. 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students 
registering on the date listed in the catalogue as the date on which 
classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations 
completed on the date listed in the catalogue as the "last day to 
register for credit." 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE FEE 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for a change of schedule after the 
registration cards have been processed. No charge is made if the 
change is initiated by the College. 

GRADUATION FEE 

Each candidate for graduation must pay a graduation fee of 
$20.00 prior to his or her graduation. This fee must be paid at 
Savannah State College. For further information, inquire at the 
Graduate Offices. 



REFUNDS 

Refunds of the matriculation fee and of non-resident tuition will 
be made only upon written application for withdrawal from school. 
No refunds are made for simply dropping a course. Refunds must be 
processed by the College at which fees were paid. Privilege fees are 
not refundable. Both Colleges follow the refund policy of the Board 
of Regents as stated below: 

Students who formally withdraw on the date of scheduled 
registration or during one week following the scheduled registra- 
tion date are entitled to a refund of 80% of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw during the period 
between one and two weeks after the scheduled registration date 
are entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who formally withdraw between two and three weeks 
after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 
40% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after 



18 



the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a 
period of four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration 
date will be entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for 
that quarter. 



DORMITORY FEES AT SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Students who occupy dormitory facilities at Savannah State 
College should refer to the Savannah State general Bulletin for 
information on fees and should contact the Office of Student Affairs 
at Savannah State for assistance. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to 
qualified students; these assistantships are awarded and administered 
jby the individual graduate departments of the two Colleges. Students 
may seek information from the individual departments about 
I assistantships but are advised to make a formal request for an 
assistantship only after their admission to the Graduate Program with 
•Regular Admission status. 

Students are invited to contact the Offices of Financial Aids at the 
two Colleges for information on federal and state programs of 
financial assistance to college students. 



VETERANS BENEFITS 

Both campuses provide graduate students with veteran's services 
through Offices of Veterans Affairs. Information of interest to 
veterans can be obtained by writing or calling the Office of Veterans 
\ffairs at either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. 

Once accepted into the graduate program, the veteran should 
ontact one of the offices for processing instructions. Since 
processing time varies, a first quarter student should expect a four to 
week delay in receiving the first benefit check. First quarter 
:udent veterans should consider this delay when making financial 
arrangements to attend school. 

For purposes of G.I. Bill benefits, ten (10) quarter hours is 
Ipnsidered to be a full load; a load of five (5) graduate quarter hours 
Untitles the graduate student to half-time benefits. 

19 



ADMISSONTO GRADUATE STUDIES 



GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Graduate course work provides an opportunity for continuing 
professional growth and competency, for expanding professional and 
cultural backgrounds, and for extending knowledge and understand- 
ing in an area of specialty. Qualified students may take advantage of 
these educational opportunities without necessarily seeking a degree. 
Admission to one of the degree programs of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program is a serious academic venture; therefore, prospective 
students are expected to show evidence of high academic potential. 
Students who enroll as degree-seeking students must meet more 
rigorous admission standards than those students who do not seek a 
master's degree. 

Applicants desiring admission on a degree-seeking status must 
present statisfactory undergraduate academic records and satis- 
factory scores on appropriate admissions examinations. Some of the 
graduate degree programs have specialized test requirements and 
undergraduate course requirements for degree-seeking students. 
Refer to the departmental programs for specific information on these 
requirements. General requirements for degree seeking students 
include the following: business administration students must provide 
satisfactory scores on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in 
Business (ATGSB); students in all M.Ed, programs must provide 
satisfactory scores on either the Aptitude Test of the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) or the Common Examination of the 
National Teacher Examinations (NTE). 

Applications for the above examinations are usually available at 
the two Colleges and will be given to students who come to the 
Colleges to obtain them. Students who wish to write for an 
application form or to submit an application for these examinations 
should contact: Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 
08540. Students should request that their test scores be sent to the 
Graduate Studies Office, Armstrong State College, Savannah, Georgia 
31406. 

Applicants for admission to M.Ed, programs must present satis- 
factory scores on either the appropriate area examination of the NTE 
or the appropriate advanced test of the GRE. For details of this 
requirement, consult the appropriate departmental entry in the 
catalogue. 



20 



TYPES OF ADMISSION 

Regular Admission (a degree-seeking classification) 

Regular Admission means that a student is admitted to the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program with full graduate status. 

A student who has earned a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college, who has completed all of the prerequisites for his 
proposed major area, and who meets the other requirements of the 
Graduate Program may be admitted on Regular Admission status. 
These requirements include minimum undergraduate grade-point 
averages in combination with certain minimum test scores. These 
grade-point averages range from a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 to a 
minimum of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and must be combined with 
minimum test scores on the ATGSB or the GRE or the NTE 
depending on the degree program (see above). The combinations of 
G.P.A. and test score constitute a numerical standard of admission 
and include intermediate points on a scale with an inverse relation 
between GPA and test scores. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the 
appropriate departmental entry. 



Conditional Admission (a degree-seeking classification) 

Conditional Admission means that a student is admitted to the 
Joint Graduate Studies Program pending his meeting certain condi- 
tions before achieving full graduate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

For Conditional Admission, a student must hold a baccalaureate 
degree and meet the other admission requirements of the Graduate 
Program. These requirements include minimum undergraduate grade- 
point averages in combination with certain minimum test scores. 
These grade-point averages range from a minimum G.P.A. of 2.2 to a 
minimum of 2.7 (on a 4.0 scale) and must be combined with 
minimum test scores on the ATGSB or the GRE or the NTE 
depending on the degree program (see above). The combinations of 
GPA and test score constitute a numerical standard of admission and 
include intermediate points on a scale with an inverse relation 
between GPA and test scores. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the 
appropriate departmental entry. 



21 



A student admitted under the Conditional category must consult 
with the appropriate departmental coordinator for an appraisal of his 
academic readiness for graduate work in the program within that 
department. The student may be required to remove any specific 
deficiencies that are ascertained by taking undergraduate supporting 
courses before he is allowed to attempt graduate courses within that 
program. 

Any conditionally admitted student who has completed fifteen 
(15) quarter hours of approved, consecutive graduate course work 
with no grade less than B may apply for and subsequently will 
receive Regular Admission status. Upon the completion of twenty- 
five (25) quarter hours of approved course work with a B average or 
better, the student achieves Regular Admission status. 

If, upon completing twenty-five (25) quarter hours of course 
work, the student does not have a B average or better (i.e., 3.0 on a 
4.0 system), he or she will be dropped as a degree-seeking student. 



Special Admission 

The special admission classification is designed for those students 
who may not wish to pursue a graduate degree, including teachers 
whose main purpose is to obtain credits necessary for teacher 
certification. Such students may be admitted to graduate courses 
under conditions specified by the Graduate Office. These conditions 
ordinarily include documentary evidence of a baccalaureate degree 
and may include consultation with the department in which the 
student intends to study. 

If the student should later decide to apply for admission as a 
degree-seeking student, he must submit a written request to the 
Graduate Office and must meet all of the requirements set forth for 
degree-seeking status. No more than ten (10) hours earned while 
enrolled as a Special Admissions Student may be applied toward a 
degree. 



Transient Student 






Transient students must have written permission from their 
advisers or other personnel at the graduate school in which they are 
enrolled in order to enroll in the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 
They must also submit the application-for-admission form and the 
$10 fee as described below. 



22 



ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

The Graduate Office at Armstrong State College is the graduate 
admissions office. All admissions documents should be sent to this 
office for processing. 

The following materials and procedures are part of the require- 
ments for admission to the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

1. The application-for-admission form, available in the Graduate 
Office at either College, must be completed and submitted. 

2. Three (3) official transcripts showing all college credits earned 
should be sent directly from the student's previous college to 
the Graduate Office at Armstrong State College. 

3. Test scores and completed recommendation forms (these forms 
available in the two Graduate Offices) must be submitted. 

4. A ten dollar ($10) application fee is required of all students, 
except graduates of Savannah State College and Armstrong 
State College. 

All materials and documents should be submitted as soon as 
possible but at least twenty (20) days prior to the registration date of 
the quarter a student enrolls. Action can be taken on applications for 
admission only after all of the required materials have been received. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY DOES NOT IMPLY 
AUTOMATIC ACCEPTANCE OF THE STUDENT AS A CANDI- 
DATE FOR ANY MASTER'S DEGREE. SEE SECTION ON 
CANDIDACY FOR DEGREE. 




23 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The student is charged with the responsibility for taking the 
initiative in meeting all academic requirements and in maintaining a 
careful check on his or her progress toward earning a degree. The 
student is responsible for discharging his or her obligations to the 
business offices and the libraries and for adhering to the rules and 
regulations appertaining to graduate students in particular and to all 
students enrolled in a unit of the University System of Georgia. 
Graduate student academic regulations are set forth in this bulletin; 
for information regarding general regulations of students using the 
property and facilities of Savannah State College or Armstrong State 
College, refer to the general bulletins and student publications of the 
two Colleges. 



ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, the student will be 
referred to a Departmental or a Program Coordinator for adviser 
assignment. Consultation with the assigned adviser is required prior 
to registration each quarter that the student enrolls. 



TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDITS 

A maximum of thirty (30) hours of credit may be transferred 
from another institution, provided: 

1. that each course equates with a course in the curriculum of th< 
Joint Graduate Program or is an acceptable elective. 

2. that the credit was earned in an accredited graduate program 

3. that a grade of B or better was earned in each course. 

4. that the credit was earned within the past five years. 

5. that no more than fifty percent of the required credits be 
transferred for use towards a master's degree (i.e., no moi 
than 50% of either the required professional education credil 
or other required credits). 



24 






For additional information on the amount of credit transferable 
for a particular degree program, refer to the appropriate depart- 
mental entry. 

The student who wishes to receive transfer graduate credit must 
make a written request for approval of the transfer of credit. This 
request is ordinarily a part of the application for Degree Candidacy, 
which is made upon the completion of 25 hours of graduate work. A 
request by letter may be submitted to the Departmental Coordinator 
prior to the application for Degree Candidacy to obtain advisement 
on transfer of credit. 



GRADUATE COURSES 

Courses numbered 500 to 599 are open to both undergraduate and 
graduate students. In such courses, the quantity and quality of work 
required of the graduate students will be on the same level as that 
required in those courses offered exclusively for graduates. Courses 
numbered 600 to 699 will be open only to graduate students. 
Candidates for master's degrees must take at least fifty percent of 
their courses at the 600 level. 



GRADUATE CLASS REGULATIONS AND GRADES 

Graduate classes are conducted in conformity with the general 
academic policies of the Joint Graduate Studies Program and the 
regulations of the Campus on which a given class is taught. Specific 
class requirements, including attendance requirements and require- 
ments for grades, are set by the instructor for each class. 

Grades assigned in graduate courses are: A, B, C, D, F (failing), I 
(incomplete), W (withdrew with no grade), WF or WP (withdrew 
failing or passing) and NC (no credit). 

Although grades of A, B, C and D are passing grades, graduate 
students are expected to excell and not to fall into the marginal 
levels of passing indicated by grades of C and D. Degree-seeking 
students must maintain an average of B (3.0) or better or be placed 
on academic probation. Academic averages are computed on the 
traditional four-point system which assigns points of through 4, per 
credit hour, to grades F through A. 

The grade of I must be removed during the quarter following its 
assignment by the student's completing the requirements of the 
course. Otherwise, the instructor will assign an appropriate grade. 

25 



The grade of W will be assigned if a student withdraws from (i.e., 
drops) a course no later than midquarter. Students withdrawing after 
midquarter will receive either the grade of WP or WF. Instructors are 
required to notify students of their standing at the time of 
withdrawal, if the withdrawal grade is to be WF. Grades of W and WP 
result in no credit for the course involved but have no effect on the 
student's academic average. The grade of WF has the same effect as 
an F on a student's average. 

The grade NC has the same effect on the student's academic 
record as W and WP (i.e., no credit and no penalty). The NC grade is 
assigned only upon petition by the student to the instructor in 
accordance with graduate policies (for information, inquire at the 
Graduate Offices). 



ACADEMIC STANDING AND PROBATION 

Any student who completes fifteen (15) quarter hours of graduate 
level courses without achieving a B average (i.e., 3.0 on a 4.0 system) 
shall be considered on probation. 

A student who is admitted as a degree-seeking student may 
continue to enroll for courses until he has accumulated at least 25 
quarter hours. If the student is on Conditional Admission status, and, 
upon completing 25 hours, does not achieve a B average or better, he 
or she will be dropped as a degree-seeking student. Any degree- 
seeking student who completes 30 hours and does not achieve a B 
average or better will be dropped as a degree-seeking student. 



COURSE LOAD LIMITATION 

A full-time graduate student is expected to carry no more than 
fifteen (15) hours per quarter. The course load for employed 
students should be appropriately reduced in consultation with their 
advisers. Students on academic probation or on Conditional Ad- 
missions status should carefully plan their course loads in consulta- 
tion with their advisers. 



WITHDRAWAL, DROPPING COURSES, AND ADDING COURSES 

Withdrawal is, in the technical sense, dropping all courses and 
processing a formal withdrawal through the Office of Graduate 
Studies which issues a withdrawal form. A student may withdraw 
from school (or drop a single course) at any time during the quarter. 

26 



Only by formally withdrawing, however, can a student become 
eligible for the refund of fees as explained in the section on fees. The 
student bears the responsibility of contacting the graduate office to 
effect a withdrawal and of contacting his professor(s) to determine 
what grade(s) he will receive (W, WF or WP). In order to expedite 
any refund due, the student must initiate his withdrawal on the same 
campus where he paid fees. 

Dropping a course should also be formalized through the Graduate 
Office which will process a drop/add slip. If a student is taking only 
one course, the drop becomes, technically, a withdrawal, and a 
refund may be due. The student is responsible for contacting his 
instructor concerning the grade he will receive (W, WF or WP). 

Adding a course is also formalized through the Graduate Office 
which will process a drop/add slip. Courses may be added only 
during the late registration days at the beginning of the quarter and 
not at any other time during the quarter. The student must pay the 
appropriate fee for the additional course, unless a course comparable 
in credit hours is being dropped simultaneously. 

The Graduate Council reserves the right to request the withdrawal 
of any student at any time during his course of studies if he does not 
meet the required standards of scholarship, or if he cannot remain in 
the program without endangering his own health or the health of 
others, or if he fails in any way to meet the standards of the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program. 



CATES COURSES 

Savannah State College and Armstrong State College participate in 
the Coastal Area Teacher Education Service, a consortium of area 
public school systems and institutions of the University System of 
Georgia offering graduate and undergraduate courses in teacher 
education. The Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at Savannah 
State College approves the acceptance of CATES courses for credit 
toward a degree program in the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

A student who wishes to apply CATES course credit to his degree 
program must obtain approval from his advisor to take a course for 
degree credit prior to taking the course. Without this prior approval, 
the course is subject to being treated as a transfer course, in which 
case, the Transfer of Graduate Credits policies and procedures 
described in this Bulletin will be followed. 



27 



DEGREES AND GENERAL 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



DEGREES OFFERED 

The following degrees are offered in the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program: 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Education in Business Education 

Master of Education in Biology 

Master of Education in Chemistry 

Master of Education in Elementary Education 

Master of Education in Special Education — Behavior Disorders 

Master of Education in English 

Master of Education in Mathematics 

Master of Education in History 

Master of Education in Political Science 

The Graduate Council has approved the addition to the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program of Master of Education degree programs in 
Industrial Arts Education, Spanish, Science Education, and Early 
Childhood Education and of Master of Science degree programs in 
Chemistry and Criminal Justice. Approval for the offering of these 
degree programs is pending action by the Board of Regents of the 
University System of Georgia. Any student who might be interested 
in one of these programs should request further information on the 
status of the program from the Office of the Associate Dean for 
Graduate Studies at either Savannah State College or Armstrong 
State College. 



TIME LIMITATION 

Students working toward a master's degree must complete all 
requirements for the degree within a period of not more than six 
years from the date of admission to the degree program. Extension 
of time may be granted by the Graduate Council, upon recommenda- 
tion of the student's major department, but only in cases of unusual 
circumstances. 



28 



COURSE AND RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of sixty (60) quarter hours of graduate credits must 
be earned for the Master of Education degree. Credit for a minimum 
of thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in residence. Courses to 
be counted for residence may be accumulated on a full-time or 
part-time basis. 

Satisfactory completion of fifty -five (55) quarter hours of 
approved graduate credits is required for the Master of Business 
Administration degree. 



BALANCE OF COURSES 

Two forms of balance in accumulating courses must be adhered to 
by degree-seeking students. First, at least fifty percent (50%) of the 
courses earned for a degree must be at the 600 level. 

Second, fifty percent (50%) of the courses applied to a degree 
must be earned at each of the two Colleges (Savannah State and 
Armstrong State). This balance of courses between the two Colleges 
includes a 50-50 balancing of the required courses and a 50-50 
balancing of the elective courses in each degree program. Minor 
deviations from this strict 50-50 balancing of courses may be allowed 
where an odd number of courses in either the required or the elective 
category or in both categories requires the deviation. The degree 
program descriptions identify the 600 level courses and provide 
additional guidance on balancing courses. 



DEGREE CANDIDACY 

Upon successful completion of twenty-five quarter hours of 
graduate work, the student is required to file an application for 
admission to candidacy. The student will submit four copies of the 
completed application to his major department. Application forms 
are available in the Graduate Offices on both campuses. 

Approval of the application will be based upon certification by the 
student's adviser that: 

1. he has been admitted to full graduate status (i.e., Regular 
Admission). 

2. he has maintained a minimum of a "B" average in all work 
attempted. 



29 



APPLICATION FOR THE DEGREE 

At the time specified on the academic calendar, the student must 
file an application for the appropriate master's degree with the 
Graduate Studies Office. 



SUMMARY OF GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

General regulations for obtaining a master's degree from the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program are summarized as follows: 

1. Admission to full graduate status. 

2. Admission to candidacy for the degree. 

3. Satisfactory completion of sixty (60) quarter hours of ap- 
proved graduate level course work for the Master of Education 
degree and fifty-five (55) quarter hours of approved graduate 
course work for the Master of Business Administration degree. 

4. Meeting T-5 certification requirement (M.Ed, program only). 

5. Maintenance of "B" average. 

6. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination. 

7. Filing an application for the degree at the time specified. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The Master of Education degree is designed to comply with the 
requirements for teacher certification at the fifth level in the various 
areas of specialization. This degree will be granted only to students 
who qualify for T-5 certification (or equivalent certification for 
other states). This requirement ordinarily entails meeting T-4 
certification requirements (Georgia). 

Detailed information concerning programs and procedures relating 
to graduate teacher certification may be obtained from the Office of 
Graduate Studies or from the Department of Education at either 
College. 



30 



DEPARTMENTS. PROGRAMS 
AND COURSES 



Departmental requirements covering admissions, prerequisite 
courses, and other aspects of the programs of study are described in 
this section of the Bulletin. 



PROGRAMS 

For each program of study, the department head on one campus 
serves as the Coordinator. For some programs, a faculty member 
other than the department head provides some coordinating services. 
The Coordinators alternate on a yearly basis between Armstrong 
State College and Savannah State College. The Coordinators termi- 
nate their roles in September of each year, and, therefore, the 1975 
Coordinators begin their service in September, 1974. 



The Departmental Coordinators for 1974 and 1975 are: 

Business Administration: Dr. Orange Hall (ASC), 1974 — Dr. Mary 

Torian (SSC), 1975. 
Business Education: Dr. Mary Torian (SSC), 1974 — Dr. Mary Torian 

(SSC), 1975. 
Biology: Dr. Margaret Robinson (SSC), 1974 —Dr. Leslie Davenport 

(ASC), 1975. 
Chemistry: Dr. Willie Tucker (SSC), 1974 - Dr. Henry Harris (ASC), 

1975. 
Elementary Education: Dr. Thelma Harmond (SSC), 1974 — Dr. 

William Stokes (ASC), 1975. 
Special Education (Under auspices of Education Department): Dr. 

Joseph Sumner (SSC), Faculty Coordinator, 1974 — Dr. Richard 

Simensen (ASC), Faculty Coordinator, 1975. 
English: Dr. Hugh Pendexter (ASC), 1974 - Dr. Luetta Milledge 

(SSC), 1975. 
History and Political Science: Dr. Elmer Dean (SSC), 1974 — Dr. 

Roger Warlick (ASC), 1975. 
Mathematics: Mr. J. B. Clemmons (SSC), 1974 — Dr. Richard 

Summerville (ASC), 1975. 



31 



COURSES 

Graduate courses are listed and described in each departmental 
section. The following course numbering system is used: courses 
numbered 500-599 may be taken by undergraduate or graduate 
students and, in some cases, are courses that are cross-listed as both 
400 and 500 courses. Courses numbered 600-699 or higher are for 
graduate students only. 

Each course listed shows the departmental identification, the 
course number, the course name, a code number and the campus 
location. The code number indicates: with the first number, the 
hours of lecture per week; with the second number, the hours of lab 
per week; and with the third number, the quarter hours of credit for 
the course. Example: Chemistry 522. Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Statements on prerequisites, campus location and descriptions 
follow the course numbers. 






BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Orange Hall, Department Head, (ASC), Dr. Mary Torian, 
Department Head, (SSC), Dr. Anderson (SSC), Dr. Bhatia (ASC), Dr. 
Byrd (SSC), Dr. Eason (ASC), Dr. Johns (SSC), Dr. Pearce (ASC), 
Dr. Richards (ASC), Dr. Singh (SSC), and Dr. Zepp (ASC). 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Business Administration 

OBJECTIVE 

The Master of Business Administration degree program is designed 
to give candidates a broad background of advanced professional 
training in organizational management. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general admission requirements and procedures 
for all graduate programs stated earlier in this bulletin, more specific 
requirements for admission to the MBA program are given below: 



32 



All applicants for admission to the MBA program are required to 
take the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business. This test is 
administered at Savannah State College and at other testing centers 
once each quarter. The test is designed to measure aptitude for 
graduate study in business and is not a measure of knowledge in 
specific subjects. Therefore, applicants should not delay taking this 
examination simply because they have not had specific course work 
in business. 



Regular Admission 

To qualify for admission on full graduate status to the MBA 
program, applicants must show competence in the common business 
core of knowledge, which requires a basic understanding of account- 
ing, economics, finance, management, marketing and statistics. 
Students who have received a bachelor's degree in business generally 
have fulfilled this requirement, but students with degrees in other 
disciplines will need preparatory work in these areas before beginning 
MBA course work. The preparatory requirements may be met by the 
satisfactory completion of courses equivalent in content to the 
following: 

Principles of Accounting (a two or three-course sequence) 

Principles of Economics (a two-course sequence) 

Principles of Management 

Principles of Marketing or Business Finance 

Statistics 

Normally, thirty-five hours of preparatory work will be the 
maximum required, although it would be desirable to have both 
^Principles of Marketing and Business Finance as well as at least one 
i course in Business Law. 

In addition to appropriate preparatory work, regular admission 
status requires that one of the following admission standards be met: 

a. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 and a score of not 
less than 450 on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in 
Business (ATGSB), or 

b. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 and a score of not 
less than 400 on the ATGSB, or 

c. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 and a score of 
not less than 425 on the ATGSB, or other combinations of 
grade point averages between 2.5 and 3.0 in conjunction with 
ATGSB scores between 450 and 400 on an inverse scale. 

33 



Conditional Admission 

Conditional admission will be accorded those applicants who meet 
all the requirements for regular admission with the exception of 
preparatory course work. Upon satisfactory completion of the 
prerequisite courses, the conditional status will be removed and 
regular admission status will be accorded. 

Conditional admission may also be given to a limited number of 
applicants who fail to meet the admission standards for regular 
admission but, nevertheless, present evidence of a reasonable 
prospect of success in the program. 

For this latter category of conditional admission, which will be 
limited to twenty percent of the total student body in the MBA 
program, applicants must meet one of the following requirements: 

a. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.2 and a score of not 
less than 425 on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in 
Business (ATGSB), or 

b. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 and a score of not 
less than 375 on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in 
Business, or 

c. Other combinations of grade point averages between 2.2 and 
2.7 in conjunction with ATGSB scores between 425 and 375 
on an inverse scale. 

Upon completion of twenty-five hours of graduate course work 
with a "B" average, the conditional admission status will be changed 
to regular admission, providing all other requirements for regular 
admission have been satisfied. 



Temporary Status 

Applicants who have not had an opportunity to take the 
Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business may be admitted for 
one quarter as Special Graduate students. They will be expected to 
take the ATGSB during that quarter. In no case will the Special 
Graduate status be continued for more than two quarters for 
degree-seeking applicants. Applicants will be denied permission to 
register as degree-seeking candidates if they have made no effort to 
take the ATGSB entrance examination while enrolled as special 
students for two quarters. 



34 



ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, each student will be 
assigned a faculty adviser. The faculty adviser will approve the 
scheduling of course work, recommend the student for candidacy, 
and serve as chairman of the student's final examination committee. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Business Administration program requires forty 
quarter-hours of core course requirements and an additional fifteen 
quarter-hours of electives from graduate course offerings. 

I. Core requirements 40 quarter hours 

BAD 601 BAD 611 BAD 662 BAD 610 

BAD 602 BAD 630 BAD 665 BAD 660 

II. Electives 15 quarter hours 

BAD 604 BAD 613 BAD 635 BAD 650 

BAD 605 BAD 620 BAD 640 BAD 663 

BAD 612 BAD 621 BAD 661 

[II. Balance of Courses. 

Students are required to take, as nearly as possible, one half 
of their course work on each campus. Responsibility for the 
MBA courses is divided between the two sponsoring colleges as 
indicated below: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Required Courses 

BAD 601 BAD 630 BAD 602 BAD 660 

BAD 610 BAD 662 BAD 611 BAD 665 

Elective Courses 



BAD 612 


BAD 650 


BAD 604 


BAD 620 


BAD 635 


BAD 661 


BAD 605 


BAD 621 


BAD 640 




BAD 613 





BAD 663 offered at SSC or ASC. 



35 



All courses are scheduled to be offered in early and late evening 
periods. The classes scheduled on the Savannah State campus meet 
on Monday and Wednesday evenings. The classes scheduled on the 
Armstrong State campus meet on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. 
Thus, there are four non-conflicting evening periods, and, normally, 
one class is scheduled at each period, that is, two on each campus 
each quarter. Each required course is offered every third quarter. A 
full-time student, having all undergraduate prerequisite courses, may 
complete the MBA program in four consecutive quarters. 



ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

It will be the responsibility of the student to make application for 
admission to candidacy after the completion of all prerequisite 
courses and twenty-five hours of graduate course work. This 
application will be in four copies to the faculty adviser. Admission to 
candidacy is contingent upon the faculty adviser's certification that 
the student has attained a "B" average in twenty-five hours of course 
work and has met all regular admission requirements including: 

(1) an acceptable score on the Admission Test for Graduate Study 
in Business. 

(2) completion of all undergraduate prerequisite courses. 

(3) removal of conditional admission status, when applicable. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A final comprehensive examination, to be scheduled in a student's 
final quarter and at least two weeks prior to graduation, is required 
of all candidates for the Degree of Master of Business Adminis- 
tration. The final examination will be conducted by a committee 
consisting of the student's faculty adviser as chairman and other 
members of the graduate faculty appointed by the MBA Coordi- 
nator. The date of the examination, the time and place, will be set by 
the Coordinator after consultation with the faculty adviser. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for 
Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the examination and the 
composition of the committee. 

The candidate is expected to demonstrate an adequate understand- 
ing of the common core of knowledge in business, economics, and 

36 



statistics, and competency to discuss advanced material in those areas 
in which he has had graduate course work. 

The examining committee's decision on the candidate's per- 
formance on the comprehensive examination shall be reported as 
"pass" or "fail" to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three days 
after the examination. Should the decision be reported as "fail," the 
committee will outline a program of corrective action to be taken by 
the candidate prior to his being re-examined. 



Graduate Courses in Business Administration 

It should be understood that prerequisite to all MBA courses, the 
student should satisfy requirements in the common body of 
knowledge of business and administration as stated above. 

BAD 601. Macro Economic Analysis. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
Principles of Economics competency. 

National income accounting. Determinants of national income, 
employment, price level and growth rates. 

BAD 602. Managerial Micro Economics. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: Principles of Economics competency. 

Price, output, and distribution theory. Economic behavior of 
households and firms. 

BAD 604. Business Relations with Government and Society. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

The business environment with consideration of the economic, 
legal and social implications for policy making. 

BAD 605. Special Economic Problems. (5-0-6). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: 15 quarter hours of graduate or undergraduate economics 
courses. 

Analysis of current economic issues. 

BAD 610. Managerial Statistics. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Ele- 
mentary Statistics. 

Applications in economic and business statistics. 

BAD 611. Quantitative Methods in Business. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: Elementary Statistics. 

The application of models and mathematical techniques to 
modern decision-making. 

BAD 612. Seminar in Business Research. (5-0-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisites: 20 quarter hours of graduate course work. 

The application of research methods in both the internal and 
external domains of business. Guided research in a substantive field 
'of the student's choice, i.e., finance, marketing, accounting, manage- 

37 



ment, forecasting, or any other area in which the objectives of the 
research project is the acquisition of information useful to business 
enterprise. 

BAD 613. Administrative Communications. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The role of communication in effective management; a study of 
foundation theory and principles for practical applications; com- 
munication problems within, between, and among organizations, 
industry, and other groups; forms, media and channels available for 
conducting effective communications in business and industry. 

BAD 620. Corporate Financial Policies. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: Principles of Business Finance and Elementary Statistics. 
Analysis of financial problems and policies of corporations. 

BAD 621. Investment Management. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate or graduate business finance or equivalent. 

The theory and tools of analysis required in the management of 
financial assets from the viewpoint of the investor and the 
investment adviser. Investment media, markets, problems, practices, 
and philosophies will be studied. 

BAD 630. Managerial Costing and Control. (5-0-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: Principles of Accounting competency. 

The study of physical and monetary input-output relationships 
and use of such cost studies for managerial strategy, planning, and 
control. 

BAD 635. Accounting for Not-for-Profit Organizations. (5-0-5). 
SSC. Prerequisite: Principles of Accounting competency. 

Basic concepts and techniques of fund accounting for govern- 
mental, educational, religious, and charitable organizations, inclusive 
of management reporting problems. 

BAD 640. Information Systems. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Princi- 
ples of Accounting competency. 

Total Information Systems for managerial strategy, planning and 
control. 

BAD 650. Marketing Problems Seminar. (5-0-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: Principles of Marketing. 

An examination of new developments in the dynamic field of 
marketing from the viewpoint of the marketing decision-maker. 

BAD 660. Advanced Management Seminar. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: Principles of Management. 

The historical foundations and development of management 
concepts. Emphasis is upon developing concepts in dealing with 
emerging problems of management. 



38 



BAD 661. Theory of Organization. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Principles of Management. 

A universally applicable study of organizations and their struc- 
tures. Organizational factors and associated concepts are examined 
and analyzed. 

BAD 662. Human Behavior in Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: Principles of Management. 

Contributions and limitations of the behavioral sciences in the 
development of modern organization theory. 

BAD 663. Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). Either ASC or SSC. 
Prerequisite: Principles of Economics competency. 

Modern industrial relations and its background. Current problems 
in labor relations. 

BAD 665. Business Policy. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisites: BAD 610, 
611 and 30 additional quarter hours of graduate credit; should be 
taken near the end of the MBA program. 

Policy making and administration from the top management point 
of view, encompassing the entire field of business administration. 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Business Education 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate program leading to the Master of 
Education Degree in Business Education are to prepare master 
teachers of business and vocational business education and to prepare 
individuals for administrative and supervisory positions in these 
specialties for the secondary and junior college levels. 

In keeping with the objectives of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program, the M.Ed, in business education is designed for furthering 
professional growth and competency, expanding professional and 
cultural backgrounds, and extending knowledge and understanding in 
business education. 

This program supplements undergraduate studies for the T-4 
Certificate to teach in Georgia and provides opportunities for 
candidates to obtain the T-5 Certificate upon completion of the 
prescribed curriculum in business education. 



39 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Formal admission to the degree program should be sought through 
the Admissions Office of the Joint Graduate Program as described in 
the General Admissions section of this Bulletin. 

In accordance with general admissions policies, regular admission 
with full graduate status requires the minimum 2.5 cumulative 
undergraduate average with a score of at least 500 on the N.T.E. 
Common (or 800 on the G.R.E. Aptitude), or the minimum 3.0 
cumulative undergraduate average with a score of at least 450 on the 
N.T.E. Common (or 750 on the G.R.E. Aptitude). Intermediate 
points on a scale with an inverse relation between G.P.A. and test 
scores are acceptable. 

Conditional admission may be granted to those students who show 
potential for successful pursuit of graduate studies. In accordance 
with general admission policies, conditional admission requires the 
minimum 2.2 G.P.A. with a score of at least 475 on the N.T.E. 
Common (or 775 on the G.R.E. Aptitude) or the minimum 2.7 
G.P.A. with a score of at least 425 on the N.T.E. Common (or 725 
on the G.R.E. Aptitude). Intermediate points on a scale as described 
above are acceptable. Specific requirements based on individual 
needs and aspirations will be stipulated by the Departmental 
Admissions Committee for meeting the requirements of regular 
admission status. 



ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in Business Education will 
be assigned an adviser. As soon as the student is notified of this 
assignment, he should arrange for a conference with his or her 
adviser. 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Initially, in order not to penalize Savannah area graduate students 
who have begun work in other institutions, especially those of the 
University System of Georgia, transfer of credits will be evaluated for 
full credit up to 50% of the required hours for graduation, but these 
credits must meet the general graduate policies on transfer of credit. 



40 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A minimum of 55 quarter hours of graduate course work with 
a B average (3.00) is required for graduation with an M.Ed, 
degree in Business Education (Note: this requirement is five (5) 
quarter hours less than generally required for M.Ed, degrees). 

2. After admission to regular status in the graduate program, and 
upon completion of 25 quarter hours of satisfactory graduate 
work, the student should file application for candidacy in 
quadruplicate to the major department. 

3. During the quarter preceding the final intended quarter of 
matriculation for the M.Ed, degree in Business Education (and 
at the time specified on the academic calendar), the candidate 
must file an application for the degree with the Graduate 
Studies Office. 

4. During the final quarter of residence, a candidate must pass a 
final comprehensive examination in the field. The Business 
Education Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans 
for Graduate Studies ten (10) days prior to the examination 
concerning the proposed place, date, and time of the examina- 
tion and the composition of the committee. The examining 
committee's decision on the candidate's performance on the 
comprehensive examination will be reported as "pass" or "fail" 
to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three (3) days after 
the examination. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
The basic plan of the curriculum is summarized as follows: 

Professional Education Courses 15 quarter hours 

Business Education Content Courses 30 quarter hours 

(Includes 10 hours of Business Administration 
cognate courses.) 
Electives 10 quarter hours 

Total hours 55 

The curriculum is designed with several options to meet the needs 
of varying specialists in the field of business teacher education. The 
course content of these options comes from appropriate selection of 
courses in the 30 hour business education content area, including the 
10 hours of cognate courses. These options are: 

Option 1. Administration and Supervision 
Option 2. Stenographic-Clerical 
Option 3. General Business and Accounting 
Option 4. Data Processing 

41 



I. Professional Education Course Requirements: 15 hours. 

A. Foundations: 5 hours. 

EDN 631 - Social Foundations of Education 

or 
EDN 611 — Philosophy and History of Education 

B. Human Growth and Development: 5 hours. 
EDN 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth 

and Development 
or 
EDN 622 — The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning 

C. Curriculum and Instruction: 5 hours. 
EDN 641 — Curriculum Planning 

or 
EDN 671 — Educational Research 

II. Content Course Requirements: 30 hours. 

Content courses, including cognate courses, and electives will be 
selected by the student based on his interests, aptitudes, and 
professional goals. A thesis option is available through registra- 
tion in BED 690. 

BED 601 BED 612 BED 631 

BED 602 BED 621 BED 632 

BED 603 BED 622 BED 690 

BED 611 BED 623 BED 700 

All of the above courses carry 5 hours credit each except 690 
and 700 which carry 10 hours credit each. 



Special Summer Workshop Courses Available 

BED 620 - 10 hours; combines BED 621 and 622. 
BED 630 - 10 hours; combines BED 631 and 632. 
BED 640 - 10 hours; combines BED 623 and computer skills. 



Business Administration Cognate Courses 

As a part of the content area, a minimum of 10 hours of 
Business Administration courses is required. These courses, 
selected in conference with the student's adviser, should 
complement the selected option of concentration. 



42 



III. Elective Course Requirements: 10 hours. 

The 10 hours of electives may be selected from Business 
Administration courses and should complement the selected 
option of concentration. 

IV. Balance of Courses 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking 
one half of their required courses and one half of their elective 
courses at each College. For the campus location of the 
Education courses, see the Education Department section of this 
Bulletin. For the campus location of the Business Adminis- 
tration courses, see the Master of Business Administration degree 
program in this section of this Bulletin. A guide to the campus 
location of the Business Education courses is given below. 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BED 611 BED 623 BED 601 BED 621 

BED 612 BED 632 BED 602 BED 631 

BED 622 BED 603 

BED 690 and 700 offered at both Colleges. 

BED 620, 630, and 640 - For information, contact the 

Coordinator. 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The student who does not hold the Georgia T-4 teaching 
certificate or its equivalent and who wishes to be certified must 
satisfy the regulations of the State Department of Education and 
Certification through additional courses in the content area in which 
certification is sought. 

The professional education requirements may be met, depending 
on the evaluation of the undergraduate transcript, through the ten 
hours of electives and an additional ten hours of graduate credit as 
follows: 

EDN 551 or 651 or equivalent 5 hours 

EDN 621 or 622 or equivalent 5 hours 

EDN 700 (Teaching Internship) 10 hours 



43 



Graduate Courses In Business Education 

BED 601. Principles, Problems, and Curriculum Development in 
Business Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive review of the basic principles and criteria for 
developing effective programs in business education on all levels, 
with special attention to problems of identification, growth, and 
contributions. 

BED 602. Current Problems and Issues in Vocational Business 
Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the principles of vocational education; federal and state 
legislation as it pertains to programs of vocational education; the 
organization and operation of vobe programs; and related research. 

BED 603. Evaluation of Research and Empirical Literature in 
Business Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Critical analysis of research studies in business education; study 
and development of reports, research studies, investigations, and 
methods of recording and retaining data, with special emphasis on 
administrative data. 

BED 611. Administration and Supervision in Business Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Principles, policies, and procedures in developing appreciation and 
understanding of and knowledge and skill in the art of effective 
administration and supervision in business education. 

BED 612. Guidance in Business Education. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The role of the business education teacher and administrator in 
developing an effective guidance program: inclusive of selection, 
recruitment, and grade or curriculum placement; keeping personnel 
records; a testing and evaluation program; counseling; placement; and 
follow-up. 

BED 621. Vocational Development in Shorthand and Type- 
writing. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Problems in development of occupational proficiency in shorthand 
and typewriting; new media and evaluation of aptitudes, interests, 
and achievement for vocational competency. 

BED 622. Vocational Development in Office Practice and Office 
Machines. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Enrichment of selected modules for developing vocational com- 
petency in the capstone course in Office Practice and in Office 
Machines. 



44 



BED 623. Vocational Development in the Teaching of Data 
Processing. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Mathematics 306 or equivalent 
computer programming skill. 

Systems, program languages, computer and keypunch operation, 
other input devices for developing modules and techniques of 
teaching modern methods of data processing. 

BED 631. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching General 
Business. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive concentration on objectives, instructional materials, 
media, teaching techniques, and evaluation procedures for general 
business and social business subjects. 

BED 632. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching Book- 
keeping and Accounting. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The development of enrichment materials and techniques for 
effective teaching and learning in bookkeeping and accounting. 

BED 690. Research and Thesis. (10 quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 

An in-depth study and concentration in the development of the 
thesis research problem. Seminar sessions for progress reporting and 
critical analysis. 

BED 700. Internship in Teaching and/or Administrative Office 
Practice. (10 quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 

Internship teaching in vocational or secondary schools for those 
with needs in this area; full time work experience in structured 
offices for experienced teachers. 

BED 620. Workshop for Vocational Development in Stenographic 
Skills. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques 
and skills incorporated in BED 621 and BED 622 as described above. 

BED 630. Workshop for Vocational Development in General 
Business and Accounting. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques 
and skills incorporated in BED 631-632 as described above. 

BED 640. Workshop for Vocational Development in Data Process- 
ing. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of program- 
ming skills and BED 623 as described above. 



BIOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Leslie Davenport, Department Head, (ASC), Dr. Margaret 
Robinson, Department Head, (SSC), Dr. Bacon (SSC), Dr. Beltz 



45 



(ASC), Dr. Benson (SSC), Dr. Hunter (SSC), Dr. Krishnamurti (SSC), 
Dr. Nambiar (SSC), Dr. Pingel (ASC), Dr. Rennie (SSC), Dr. Thome 
(ASC), and Dr. Woodhouse (SSC). 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Biology 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to graduate courses in biology requires that a student 
meet the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program and be formally admitted as a graduate student. 



ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Biology Faculty and a professional adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each of his 
advisers and plan his program under their guidance, and should have 
at least one conference per quarter with his academic adviser. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

I. Professional Education Courses 10 quarter hours 

These courses specified by the Education Department. 

II. Academic Courses — Biology 25 quarter hours 

In order to receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in 
Biology, the student will be expected to have acquired at least 
the following credits in either his upper division undergraduate 
or graduate work: 



15 quarter hours in botany 
15 quarter hours in zoology 
5 quarter hours in cell biology 



If the entering student has had no courses in any of these 
areas, his graduate program in biology must include courses to 
assure this diversification. Each student must include 5 quarter 
hours credit for the course, Biological Sciences in the Secondary 
School, which may be credited as either Biology or Education. 



46 



The student entering the program with previous credits in 
biology will be required to take courses as needed in any of the 
indicated areas (botany, zoology, cell biology) to assure the 
prescribed minimum diversification. In addition to meeting the 
minimum requirement for diversification, he will elect courses 
with the advice of his graduate advisers to meet the total 
requirement of 25 hours in biology plus electives to comply with 
item three (III) below. 

III. Electives — Biology and Education 25 quarter hours 

No more than 20 quarter hours of graduate credit may be 
taken in either field (Biology or Education) but this should not 
be interpreted to restrict any course work which exceeds the 
minimum requirements for the degree. 

IV. Balance of Courses 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by 
taking one half of their required courses and one half of their 
elective courses at each of the two Colleges. A guide to the 
location of the biology courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 



BIO 500 


BIO 520 


BIO 609 


BIO 550 


BIO 540 


ZOO 510 


BIO 501 


BIO 525 


BIO 612 


BIO 580 


BIO 510 


ZOO 525 


BIO 502 


BIO 526 


BIO 630 


BIO 605 


BOT 525 


ZOO 529 


BIO 506 


BIO 527 


BOT 607 


BIO 635 


BOT 620 


ZOO 535 


BIO 515 


BIO 601 
BOT 625 


BOT 615 


BIO 640 


ZOO 605 
ZOO 646 


ZOO 645 



BIO 630 offered at either college. 

For location of Education Courses, see the Education 
Department section of this bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in biology, each 
student is required to pass a comprehensive examination covering the 
areas in which he has had course work in biology. The examination 
may be oral or written at the student's option. Oral examinations 
will last no more than one and one-half hours; written examinations 
will last no more than three hours. This examination will be 
completed no later than mid-term of the quarter preceding that in 
which graduation is anticipated. If the student should fail the 
examination, he may be re-examined orally or in writing, at the 



47 



discretion of the departments, in areas of specific weakness only. The 
Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed 
place, date, and time of the examination and the composition of the 
committee. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 

Graduate Courses in Biology 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Savannah State College: 

BIOLOGY 500. Physiological Ecology. (3-4-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisites: Principles of Ecology and Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological 
adaptations of plants and animals to specific environments. Emphasis 
will be placed on the physiological problems faced by organisms 
common to the local salt marsh and marine environments. 

BIOLOGY 501. General Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Twenty hours of Biological Sciences, Organic Chemistry, and General 
Physics. 

A study of the physics and chemistry of mechanisms underlying 
functional occurrences in living organisms, particularly those in- 
volved in homeostasis. 

BIOLOGY 502. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: General Physiology. 

A systematic study of the functions of the organs in the animal 
kingdom and the physiological principles involved. 

BIOLOGY 506. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
General and Field Botany and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to cellular and organismal functions important in 
the life of green plants with emphasis on the physical and chemical 
basis of the observed properties and processes. 

BIOLOGY 515. Marine Biology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
General Botany and Invertebrate Zoology. 

An introduction to the physiological and ecological biology of 
microorganisms, plants, and animals of the sea and its shores. 

BIOLOGY 520. Molecular Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Genetics and Organic Chemistry. 

The nature and function of genetic material, genetic code and 
physical basis of inheritance. The study also includes genetic control 
of cellular metabolism; mechanism of gene action; genetic capacity 
for biosynthesis; gene enzyme relationship; and chemical nature of 
agents of heredity. 



48 






BIOLOGY 525. Bacterial Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Microbiology and General Physiology. 

A review of current knowledge of bacterial growth and repro- 
duction considered at the molecular level. Study of cellular structure 
growth-kinetics, the synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein, the 
regulation of metabolism and general cellular physiology; the 
patterns of energy generation and biosynthesis and their regulation. 

BIOLOGY 526. Virology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Micro- 
biology. 

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of 
the viruses with emphasis on the techniques of isolation and 
cultivation. 

BIOLOGY 527. Mycology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Micro- 
biology. 

A study of the ecology, physiology, and systematics of micro- 
fungi with emphasis on those forms of industrial or general economic 
importance. 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Armstrong State College: 

BOTANY 510. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Botany 203 and Organic Chemistry. 

A survey of physiological processes occuring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect these processes. 

BOTANY 525. Plant Morphology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Botany 203. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, 
structure, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 

BIOLOGY 540. Cytology. (2-6-5). ASC. Prerequisite: Two senior 
division courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differentia- 
tion, and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 550. Evolution. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: major in 
biology (at least 15 quarter hours credit in upper division courses). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 580. General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Two upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology). 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations and 
communities in the field. 

ZOOLOGY 510. General Vertebrate Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the 
vertebrates. 



49 



ZOOLOGY 525. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. (2-6-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and department 
head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine 
invertebrates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern 
coastal region. 

ZOOLOGY 529. Endocrinology. (4-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Zoology 390 and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism 
and reproductive cycles. 

ZOOLOGY 535. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 204, and Organic Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ 
systems involved in the maintenance of homestasis under varying 
conditions within normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues 
and systems under laboratory conditions. 

The following courses are open to graduate students only: 

BIOLOGY 601. Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology. (3-4-5). 
SSC. Prerequisites: Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and 
Principles of Genetics (5 hrs.). Recommended: Biochemistry and/or 
Microbiology. 

Concepts of biochemistry and biophysics of cells, nutrition, 
metabolism and energy transfer, molecular genetics, cellular anatomy 
and physiology, cytology, and ultrastructure. 

ZOOLOGY 605. Advanced Animal Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. 
Prerequisites: One course in General Physiology (5 hrs.) and 
complete sequence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study concerning functional activities of living organisms 
including humans in terms of both cellular and systemic functions. 
These topics include biological energetics, electrolyte distribution, 
transport through membranes, and colloidal state in biological 
systems. 

BOTANY 607. Advanced Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisites: One course in Plant Physiology (5 hrs.) and complete 
sequence in Organic Chemistry. 

Comparative study of nutritional requirements, metabolism, 
growth and development, respiration, photosynthesis, and other 
processes in selected vascular and non-vascular plants. 

BIOLOGY 609. Advanced Microbiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisites: Introductory Microbiology or Bacteriology (5 hrs.) and 
complete sequence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study of important pathogenic microorganisms producii 
human disease, including characteristics of microorganisms, princi 



50 



pies of host-parasite relationships, epidemiology, and immunity. 
Consideration will be given to microorganisms in their natural and 
unnatural environments with emphasis on techniques used in 
evaluation of their presences and effects in food, water, and soil. 

BIOLOGY 612. Advanced Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Genetics (5 hrs.) and complete sequence of Organic 
Chemistry. 

Study of gene structure and gene action from a molecular 
viewpoint. Recent concepts and experimental approaches for recom- 
binational analysis, mutagenesis, and metabolism of DNA, RNA and 
protein will be discussed. 

BOTANY 615. Comparative Morphology of Non- Vascular Plants. 
(3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hrs.). Recom- 
mended: Plant Anatomy (5 hrs.). 

Comparative morphology of vascular plants emphasizing identifi- 
cation, life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 

BOTANY 625. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisites: General Botany (10 hrs.) and Plant Systematics (5 hrs.) 

A two course sequence designed primarily for teachers, emphasiz- 
ing the identification of local flora (vascular and non-vascular) 
phylogeny, environmental relationships, techniques for collecting 
and preservation, and the selection and use of materials for 
correlating the study of plants with other subjects. 

BIOLOGY 630. The Biological Sciences in the Secondary 
Schools. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: Fifteen hours of biological 
sciences. 

A course designed especially for high school biology teachers. A 
comprehensive study of national programs for high school biology 
with special emphasis on the BSCS approaches. Laboratory ex- 
periences will include utilization of actual BSCS materials and 
apparati. 

BIOLOGY 635. Advanced General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: General Ecology or Plant Ecology or Animal Ecology (5 
hrs.). Recommended: Statistics. 

Studies of the processes and functional aspects of population and 
community ecology emphasizing interaction between structure and 
the environment. Consideration will be given to problems of 
environmental pollution. 

BIOLOGY 640. Cellular Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and 5 hours of Physiology. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between micro- 
scopic anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, 
metabolism, and growth. 

ZOOLOGY 645. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. 



51 



ZOOLOGY 646. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. 
Prerequisites: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A two course sequence designed primarily for teachers, emphasiz- 
ing the identification of local fauna (vertebrate and invertebrate) 
phylogeny, environmental relationships, techniques for collection 
and preservation, and the selection and use of materials for 
correlating the study of animals with other subjects. 



CHEMISTRY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Henry Harris, Department Head, (ASC), Dr. Willie Tucker, 
Department Head, (SSC), Dr. Brewer (ASC), Dr. James (SSC), Dr. 
Menon (SSC), Dr. Raut (SSC), Dr. Robbins (ASC), Dr. Stratton 
(ASC). 



Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Chemistry 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in Chemistry must meet the 
general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program and must take the chemistry area examination of the 
National Teacher Examinations (NTE) in order to qualify for 
degree-seeking status. 



ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Chemistry Faculty and a professional adviser from the 
Joint Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each 
of his advisers and plan his program under their guidance, and should 
have at least one conference per quarter with each adviser. 



52 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
I. Professional Education Courses 10 quarter hours 

These courses are selected in consultation with the Education 
Adviser. A Professional Education Core group of courses from 
which the student ordinarily selects courses is shown below: 

EDN 621 Advanced Studies in Human Growth and 
Development or EDN 622 The Nature and Conditions 
of Human Learning 
EDN 631 Social Foundations of Eduction 
EDN 641 Curriculum Planning 
EDN 671 Educational Research 

I. Chemistry Courses 25 quarter hours 

These courses are selected, in consultation with the student's 
chemistry adviser, from the graduate courses in chemistry. 

I. Electives 25 quarter hours 

Electives are to be chosen through advisement and according 
to individual needs and may include courses in chemistry, 
education or a suitable third field with the prior approval of the 
student's advisers. 

V. Transfer of Credits. 

Students who have earned graduate credits at an accredited 
institution may transfer a limited number of credits to be 
applied toward the M.Ed, degree in chemistry. Transfer of credit 
is handled on an individual basis. 

V. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirements by 
taking one half of their required courses and one half of their 
elective courses at the two Colleges. A guide to the location of 
the courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

CHEM 500, CHEM 600, CHEM 641 CHEM 522, CHEM 600, CHEM 683 

CHEM 541, CHEM 610, CHEM 682 CHEM 551, CHEM 642, CHEM 691 

CHEM 581, CHEM 621, CHEM 692 CHEM 561, CHEM 662, CHEM 693 

CHEM 592, CHEM 631, CHEM 694 CHEM 591, CHEM 681, CHEM 698 
CHEM 699 

A guide to the campus location of the education courses is in 
the Education Department section of this bulletin. 

53 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in chemistry, 
each student is required to pass a comprehensive examination 
covering the areas in which he has had course work. The examination 
may be oral or written at the student's option. Oral examinations 
will last no more than one and one-half hours; written examinations 
will last no more than three hours. This examination will be 
completed no later than mid-term of the quarter preceding that in 
which graduation is anticipated. If the student should fail the 
examination, he may be reexamined orally or in writing, at the 
discretion of the departments, in areas of specific weakness only. The 
Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed 
place, date, and time of the examination and the composition of the 
committee. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 

Graduate Courses in Chemistry 
CHEMISTRY 500. Introduction to Chemical Research. (2-0-2). 

ssc. 

This course outlines systematic methods of literature research and 
preparation research outlines from reference to original articles. 

CHEMISTRY 522. Inorganic Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

Modern theory of structures and bonding, acid-base theories, and 
properties of some rare elements and unusual compounds will be 
detailed. The latter includes nonstoichiometric compounds, rare gas 
compounds, and coordination complexes. 

CHEMISTRY 541. Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 
Basic organic chemistry to include structures, reactions, and 
reaction mechanisms. 

CHEMISTRY 551. History of Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the 
present. Emphasis is placed on the development of ideas, men who 
made significant contributions, evolution of chemical theories and 
the modern social implications of science. 

CHEMISTRY 561. Biochemistry. (4-3-5). ASC. 
Study of buffers, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids, 
proteins, enzymes, Kreb's cycle and other metabolism routes. 

CHEMISTRY 581. Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 

The basic principles, theories, and application of fundamental 
analytical chemistry are examined. The concepts of dynamic 
equilibrium, gravimetric and volumetric analysis are stressed. 



54 



CHEMISTRY 591. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 

This course is designed to cover the basic principles of thermo- 
dynamics and molecular structure and their applications to chemical 
systems. 

CHEMISTRY 592. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 591. 

Topics to be discussed will vary and will include subjects such as 
surface chemistry, photochemistry, irreversible processes and crystal 
structure. 

CHEMISTRY 600. Chemical Research. (0-15-5). SSC. 
Research under the supervision of a member of the Joint Graduate 
Chemistry Faculty. 

CHEMISTRY 610. Radiochemistry. (2-3-3). SSC. 

A general course dealing with nuclear structure, radioactive 
properties and decay characteristics of radioisotopes, their produc- 
tion and purification. Different types of detection of radiation, 
identification of radioisotopes and their practical applications will 
also be discussed. 

CHEMISTRY 621. Chemistry for High School Teachers. (4-3-5). 
SSC. 

This course covers CHEM Study material and also Chemical 
Bonding Approach material for high school teachers. 

CHEMISTRY 631. Development of Chemical Theories. (3-0-3). 
SSC. 

A study of the basic principles upon which well known chemical 
theories are founded. Topics such as the kinetic molecular theory, 
chemical equilibria, and spectroscopy will be discussed. 

CHEMISTRY 641. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 
Prerequisite: 541. 

Discussion of significant principles of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 642. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2-0-2). ASC. 

Discussion of significant principles of chemical bonding, stereo- 
chemistry and conformation analysis, spectroscopy and similar topics 
which are applicable to an understanding of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 662. Biochemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 561. 

A consideration of the chemical and physical principles employed 
in the study of macromolecules of biological importance. 

CHEMISTRY 681. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 581. 

Advanced theories and methods of analytical chemistry. 



55 



CHEMISTRY 682. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (2-0-2). SSC. 

The current problems facing analytical chemistry are used to 
coordinate and to examine contemporary thought in this field. 
Problems such as trace environmental analysis, analysis of unique 
materials and non-destructive analysis will be treated. 

CHEMISTRY 683. Instrumental Analysis. (2-3-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 581. 

A study of the fundamental principles, construction and opera 
tional characteristics of modern instrumentation as related tc 
physiochemical analytical techniques. Optical, electrometric am 
chromatographic separation procedures are discussed and practiced 

CHEMISTRY 691. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC 
An advanced study of molecular structure, the physical properties 
of matter, and the nature of chemical bonding. 

CHEMISTRY 692. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3-0-3). SSC. 
A primary study of classical thermodynamics and energetics with 
applications to chemical systems. 

CHEMISTRY 693. Quantum Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

A review of classical mechanics and the rise of wave mechanics 
Applications of wave mechanics to simple molecules and approxi- 
mation methods will be considered. A conceptual formulation of th< 
quantum theory and discussion of the one-dimensional Schroedingei 
equation. 

CHEMISTRY 694. Chemical Kinetics. (3-0-3). SSC. 

A study of rate processes and reaction mechanisms. Topics such 
theories of reaction rates, activation energies, reactions in solution 
homogenous and heterogenous catalysis, and experimental methods 
will be covered. 

CHEMISTRY 698. Seminar (2-0-2) and Chemistry 699, Seminar 
(2-0-2). ASC and SSC. 

Discussion of selected topics. 



EDUCATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Thelma Harmond, Department Head, (SSC), Dr. William 
Stokes, Department Head, (ASC), Dr. Adams (SSC), Dr. Agyekum 
(SSC), Dr. Barber (ASC), Dr. Burgis (SSC), Dr. Cochran (SSC), Dr. 
Eaton (SSC), Dr. Gadsden (SSC), Dr. Lane (ASC), Dr. Lawson (SSC), 
Dr. Lentini (ASC), Dr. Newberry (ASC), Dr. Robinson (SSC), Dr. 
Sartor (SSC), Dr. Simensen (ASC), Dr. Stephens (SSC), Dr. Sumner 
(SSC) and Dr. Ward (ASC). 



56 



Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 

Master of Education in Elementary Education and in 

Special Education-Behavior Disorders 

OBJECTIVES 

By offering advanced preparation to those who professionally 
serve in schools, the Colleges hope to aid in the development of 
teachers who possess the highest qualities of character, commitment, 
and professional competence. This aim will be facilitated by 

(1) encouraging the student to do scholarly study in advanced 
professional, specialized and general education subject matter; 

(2) helping the student become acquainted with the most recent 
research developments in child growth and development and the 
latest trends in curriculum; (3) deepening his appreciation for 
performance in scientific investigation and research; and (4) pro- 
moting personal and professional maturity of the student that will be 
reflected in his relationships as he goes about his work in the 
community and in the field of education. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the elementary education and the special 
education programs must satisfy all general admission requirements 
of the Joint Graduate Studies Program. These students must submit 
scores on both the "Commons" and the "Education in the 
Elementary School Examination" parts of the National Teacher 
Examinations (NTE) for admission as degree-seeking students. 

The general requirements for admission, for advisement, for the 
Comprehensive Examination, and for the twenty quarter hours of 
required courses in the Professional Sequence are the same for both 
programs. However, since the details given below are primarily those 
for the M.Ed, in Elementary Education, it is imperative that students 
wishing to work toward the M.Ed, in Special Education contact the 
Coordinator for advisement before beginning the program. 



ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after admission to the program, .each student will be 
assigned an adviser in the Department of Education. As soon as he is 
notified of this assignment, the student should schedule an appoint- 
ment with his adviser to determine any conditions and specific 
requirements the student must meet in order to complete both his 
degree and certification objectives. 



57 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Graduate students majoring in elementary education must com- 
plete a minimum of sixty quarter hours of approved courses. These 
hours are divided as follows: Professional Sequence — 20 hours; 
Specialized Content Courses — 25 hours; Approved Electives — 15 
hours. 

The specialized content courses may be chosen from the following 
areas: art and music; foreign languages; health and physical educa- 
tion; language arts including reading, literature, speech, linguistics; 
mathematics and science; and the social studies. Educational back- 
ground, types of teaching experience, specific needs, interests and 
the goals of students will be the determinants for staff advisement in 
student selection of content areas. Upon the basis of the foregoing 
factors, students may choose specialized courses from two or from 
several of the content areas. 

I. Required Courses: total of 45 quarter hours 

A. Professional sequence 20 hours 

EDN 621 Advanced Studies in Human Growth and 

Development or EDN 622 Nature and Conditions 
of Human Learning 
EDN 631 Social Foundations of Education 
EDN 641 Curriculum Planning 
EDN 671 Educational Research or EDN 672 Field Project 

B. Specialized Content Courses 25 hours 

With advisement, students will select five of the following: 

EDN 540 EDN 591 EDN 642 EDN 692 EDN 695 

EDN 541 EDN 592 EDN 643 EDN 693 EDN 696 

EDN 542 EDN 601 EDN 691 EDN 694 EDN 697 

II. Elective Courses: total of 15 quarter hours 

With advisement, students will select three of the following: 

EXC522 EDN 521 EDN 611 EDN 632 EDN 661 

EXC 525 EDN 551 EDN 625 EDN 651 EDN 662 

Supervising Teacher Service Courses 
EDN 681 EDN 682 EDN 683 



58 



These supervision courses may be used to satisfy the 15 hours of 
elective credit requirement. However, these courses are open only to 
students who have received special permission to enroll in them. See 
the Coordinator for additional information. 

III. Balance of Courses 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by 
taking one-half of their required courses and one-half of their 
elective courses at each College. A guide to the location of the 
courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Professional Sequence Courses 

EDN 641 EDN 631 

EDN622* EDN 621* 

EDN 672** EDN 671** 

*Offered concurrently on each campus. 
** Offered concurrently on each campus. 

Content Courses for Elementary Education 

EDN 542 EDN 643 EDN 540 EDN 692 

EDN 592 EDN 693 EDN 541 EDN 695 

EDN 601 EDN 694 EDN 591 EDN 697 

EDN 642 EDN 696 EDN 691 

Elective Courses for Elementary Education 

EXC 525 EDN 661 EXC 522 EDN 625 

EDN 611 EDN 662 EDN 521 EDN 651 

EDN 632 *EDN 682 EDN 551 *EDN 681 
*EDN 683 



'Since these courses deal with the preparation of teachers for the supervision of student 
teaching, an undergraduate activity on each campus, the departments on each campus 
will arrange for team teaching with a representative from each College. 



EDN 673— may be taken at either College. 

Special Education Courses 

EXC 525 EXC 680 EXC 522 EXC 681 

EXC 526 EXC 686 EXC 623 EXC 685 

EXC 673 and EXC 687 may be taken at either College. 



59 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

I. Professional Sequence 20 quarter hours 

Same as Elementary Education Professional Sequence 



EDN621 orEDN 622 
EDN 631 



EDN 641 

EDN 671 or EDN 672 



II. Specialization Courses 30 quarter hours 



EXC 522 
EXC 680 
EXC 681 



EXC 685 
EXC 686 
EXC 687 



III. Electives 10 quarter hours 

EXC 525 EXC 623 EXC 673 

IV. Balance of Courses 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by 
taking one-half of their required courses and one-half of their 
elective courses at each College. A guide to the location of the 
course is in the Elementary Education section of this Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

The Faculty of the Joint Graduate Education Program will 
administer a locally developed objective-type examination to all 
students who wish to become candidates for the Master's degree. 
Taken when the student has completed approximately one-half of his 
program, the examination, known as the Comprehensive Diagnostic 
Qualifying Examination, will sample the student's knowledge in the 
Professional Sequence Courses, the Specialized Content Courses, and 
the Elective courses. 

The results of the examination will be used by the student and his 
adviser in planning the remainder of the student's program. A 
student must satisfactorily complete the examination in order to 
become a candidate for the Master's degree. However, a student may 
repeat the examination upon the recommendation of his adviser. 

Students are responsible for notifying the Coordinator of their 
intention to take the Comprehensive Examination at least 90 days 
prior to the time the student wishes to take the examination. The 
Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies, ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed 
place, date and time of the examination and the composition of the 
committee. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 



60 



Graduate Courses In Education 

EDUCATION 521. Tests and Measurements. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Principles and procedures in evaluating pupil growth. 

EDUCATION 540. Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 
School. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Exploration in the four broad areas of the language arts. 
Investigation of pertinent research of the past decade; opportunities 
for enriching experiences with media and through demonstration. 

EDUCATION 541. Methods of Teaching Reading. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Basic principles and methods underlying the elementary school 
reading program. 

EDUCATION 542. Reading and Literature for Children. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

This course is designed to acquaint elementary teachers with the 
stimulating language environment of the wide world of literature for 
children. The literature approach to language learning seeks to assist 
the teacher in guiding children to become active, sensitive learners 
who seek to explore, inquire, and discover. 

EDUCATION 551. Newer Teaching Media I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The first course in a two-course sequence. Multisensory learning 
and the utilization of audiovisual materials, newer teaching hardware, 
and programmed materials. 

EDUCATION 591. Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Opportunities for acquiring basic knowledge in science appropriate 
for the elementary grades. 

EDUCATION 592. Modern Mathematics for Elementary 
Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Content concentration emphasizing the rigor, mathematical lang- 
uage, and subject matter to be taught in the elementary school. 

EDUCATION 601. The Language Arts in the Educative Process. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Provisions for an examination of language developments. Current 
issues and recent research in the language arts curriculum. Theoretic- 
ally and practically, students will be aided in finding adequate 
solutions to language problems which confront them in the daily 
teaching experience. 

EDUCATION 611. Philosophy and History of Education. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

Modern philosophical systems and their impact on educational 
theory and practice. 



61 






EDUCATION 621. Advanced Studies in Human Growth and 
Development. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A comprehensive view of human growth and development with 
emphasis upon the recent literature in these fields. 

EDUCATION 622. The Nature and Conditions of Human Learn- 
ing. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An advanced study of the various theories of learning with 
emphasis upon the latest ideas in this field. 

EDUCATION 625. Contemporary Problems in Educational 
Psychology. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Two or more courses in 
psychology or sociology or a combination of the two. 

A seminar to explore contemporary problems of a psycho-social 
nature affecting education. 

EDUCATION 631. Social Foundations of Education. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Basic graduate course in the contributions of the social sciences to 
education, focused on the significant issues and problems of 
education. 

EDUCATION 632. Education and Minority Group Problems. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of intergroup education related to the problems of 
American ethnic, racial, and religious minorities. 

EDUCATION 641. Curriculum Planning. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Trends, issues, and understandings needed for curriculum develop- 
ment and teaching. 

EDUCATION 642. Seminar in Elementary Education. (Credit 
Varies.) SSC. 

Opportunities to analyze issues, theories, and practices in elemen- 
tary education. Credit, one to five quarter hours. 

EDUCATION 643. Problems in Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Investigation of problems met in the teaching of reading. 

EDUCATION 651. Newer Teaching Media II. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: EDN 551. 

An advanced course continuing in-depth study of newer teaching 
media. 

EDUCATION 661. Principles and Practices of Guidance. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

An introduction to the philosophy and procedures of guidance in 
both the elementary and secondary school. 

EDUCATION 662. Guidance in Elementary Schools. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 



62 



EDUCATION 662. Guidance in Elementary Schools. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

Application of the guidance point of view and guidance techniques 
to the elementary school classroom. Emphasis is upon the teacher's 
role in cooperating with professional guidance workers. 

EDUCATION 671. Educational Research. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Methodology of educational research and its application to 
instruction and guidance. 

EDUCATION 672. Field Project. (Credit Varies.) SSC. 
An "on-the-job" research project dealing with improvement in the 
student's specific situation. 

EDUCATION 673. Individual Research. (5 hours credit). ASC or 
SSC. 

EDUCATION 681. Directing and Evaluating Student Teaching. (5 
quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 

Information, skills and understandings required for effective 
supervision of student teachers. Selected teachers. 

EDUCATION 682. Internship for Supervising Teachers. (5 
quarter hours). SSC and ASC. 

Cooperative field experience involving public school teachers, 
student teachers, college personnel. 

EDUCATION 683. Seminar in Supervision. (5 quarter hours). 
SSC and ASC. 

An opportunity for experienced supervising teachers to evaluate 
criteria and to develop plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 

EDUCATION 691. Environmental Science. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Exploration of science principles through problem-solving. De- 
signed to make environmental science situations meaningful. 

EDUCATION 692. Zoology for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Modern approaches to teaching the biological sciences. Emphasis 
on understanding of life processes in the animal kingdom. 

EDUCATION 693. Botany for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

Lecture — laboratory course dealing with principles involved in 
classifying and identifying plant life. 

EDUCATION 694. Chemistry for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A study of the more important metallic and non-metallic elements 
with emphasis on practical application at the elementary school level. 



63 



EDUCATION 695. Earth Science for Elementary Teachers. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Composition of earth, classification and identification of rocks 
and minerals. 

EDUCATION 696. Geography for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A critical examination of instructional procedures and techniques 
in teaching geography in elementary grades. Selection, organization 
and presentation of structured facets of human environment, both 
cultural and physical. Emphasis given to the conceptional approach 
in the analysis of space and regional interaction. 

EDUCATION 697. Social Studies for Elementary Teachers. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Investigation of newer approaches to social studies teaching. 
Emphasis on related skills as map and graph reading. Analysis of 
behavioral objectives for social studies teaching. 



EPDA Reading Institute Courses 

The following courses have been approved for graduate credit by 
the Graduate Council, each carrying five quarter hours of credit, and 
offered by the Education Professions Development Act Institute in 
R eading at Savannah State College. 

EDUCATION 942. Trends and Practices in the Teaching of 
Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis of trends and practices in the teaching of reading 
involving intensive critical review of literature used for the dis- 
advantaged in selected areas. 

EDUCATION 943. New Approaches to Teaching Reading. (Credit 
Varies.) SSC. 

A study of new successful approaches to teaching reading. 
(Practicum.) 

EDUCATION 944. The Psychology of Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Concerned with assessment of the psychological bases of reading 
and reading instruction. 

EDUCATION 945. Linguistics and Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A component of applied linguistics with special emphasis on the 
problems of the disadvantaged. 

EDUCATION 946. Motivational Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Concerned with contingency management system and audiovisual 
aids as means of motivating the disadvantaged pupil to read. 



64 



EDUCATION 947. The Teaching of Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The course attempts to cover systematically the reading program 
in the school from grades one through seven. Major emphasis will be 
placed on the developmental reading program for the disadvantaged. 



Graduate Courses In Education — Exceptional Children 

EXC 522. Introduction to Exceptional Children. (5-0-5). ASC. 
An introductory study of the identification, diagnosis, and 
education of the atypical child. 

EXC 525. Mental Hygiene in Teaching. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A consideration of the forces and influences on what constitutes 
normal behavior in personal and social relationships within the 
school setting. Student behavior, teacher behavior, and student- 
teacher interaction dynamics will receive major attention. Open to 
qualified undergraduate students, graduate students, and teachers 
seeking renewal of certificates. 

EXC 526. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. (5-0-5). SSC. 

EXC 623. Assessment and Measurement of the Exceptional Child. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

This course will emphasize the meanings and interpretations of 
psychological, psychiatric, educational, and other evaluations. It will 
attempt to help the teacher understand and make relevant the test 
specialists' report. 

EXC 6 . Behavioral Intervention Procedures for Children. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

To acquaint students with historical background, developments, 
concepts, definitions, terminology, and techniques of behavioral 
intervention, as well as application of such procedures. 

EXC 653. Remedial Reading. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. 

A study of various methods and media for teaching reading to 
exceptional children. A practicum experience of the student working 
with an exceptional child will be part of the course. 

EXC 673. Independent Research. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. 

EXC 680. Behavior Pathology in Children. (5-0-5). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: EXC 522. 

A study of the epidemeology, etiology, prognosis, and treatment 
of behavior disorders in children. An extensive examination of the 
social milieu will characterize the course. 

EXC 681. Education of the Emotionally Disturbed. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: EXC 680. 

The student will survey the various types of programs and 



65 



approaches historically and currently in operation for the 
emotionally disturbed child. Emphasis will be placed on those 
programs within the public school setting. 

EXC 685-686-687. Practicum in Special Education. (5 hours 
credit each course). 

EXC 685. Five hours to be taken among the first twenty -five 
hours of the student's program. During this time the student will be 
required to interact with behavior disordered and /or multiple 
handicapped children a minimum of eight clock hours per week in 
programs designed to ameliorate the disability. It is recommended 
that the student participate in two or more programs. 

EXC 686. Prerequisite: EXC 685. Five quarter hours of individual 
studies under the direction of the student's adviser, or the adviser's 
designate, to be taken prior to the five final hours of practicum. The 
individual studies program will be designed so that the student 
develops proficiency in a minimum of one mode of treatment for 
behavior disordered children. The student will be required not only 
to develop expertise in a theoretical approach but be afforded the 
opportunity to interact with a student, or students, in tutorial 
situations for practical application of the theoretical model selected 
for study. 

EXC 687. Prerequisite: EXC 686. Five hours taken during the 
terminal stages of the student's program. The student will be 
required to serve a minimum of ten clock hours per week in facilities 
designed for behavior disordered and/or multiple handicapped 
children. The student will be expected to have direct involvement in 
teaching exceptional children. A portion of this five quarter hours 
must be served in a residential facility. 



ENGLISH 



FACULTY 

Dr. Luetta Milledge, Department Head, (SSC), Dr. Hugh 
Pendexter, Department Head, (ASC), Dr. Daub (SSC), Dr. Johns 
(SSC), Dr. Jones (ASC), Dr. Killorin (ASC), Dr. Lunz (SSC), Dr. 
Maher (SSC), Dr. O'Neill (SSC), Dr. Seale (ASC), and Dr. Strozier 
(ASC). 



66 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in English 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of English, in cooperation with the Department 
of Education, offers a program of study leading to the Master of 
Education degree with a concentration in English. The objectives of 
this program of study are : 

1. To upgrade the teaching of secondary school English by 
increasing the competencies of English teachers in the areas of 
linguistics, composition, and literature. 

2. To enable teachers of English in secondary schools to pursue 
study that will enrich their skills, knowledge, and understand- 
ing in the teaching of language, composition, and literature; 

3. To provide opportunities for professional growth and cultural 
enrichment for individuals holding the bachelor's degree but 
having no further degree or certification objectives; 

4. To enable teachers of English in secondary schools to qualify 
for the T-5 certificate. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

All students entering the M.Ed, program in English must present 
the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test in Literature and 
English. A student scoring 560 or above will be admitted directly 
into graduate English courses; a student scoring below 560 will be 
required to take supporting work. 



ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in English will be assigned 
an academic adviser from the English Department and a professional 
adviser from the Education Department. As soon as the student is 
notified of this assignment, he should arrange for a conference with 
his advisers. 



67 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Summary of Requirements 

1. Professional Education Courses 10 quarter hours 

2. English Courses (required, plus 

electives) 35 quarter hours 

3. Free Elective Courses 15 quarter hours 

4. Balance of Courses 

I. Professional Education Courses 10 quarter hours 

EDN 621— Advanced Studies in Human Growth 

or 
EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education 

or 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning 

II. English Courses 35 quarter hours 

A. A student may count no more than 15 hours of 500 level 
work toward the degree. 

B. English 600 and 601 are required of all students. 

C. English 602 is required of all students who have not taken an 
undergraduate course in Liguistics and Transformational 
Grammar. Others shall substitute English 603. 

D. English courses numbered 607 through 616 may be taken 
twice if the course is offered a second time with a different 
topic. 

III. Free Elective Courses 15 quarter hours 

No more than 10 hours of free elective courses are allowed in 
any one department. 

Some suggested Education courses are: 

EDN 600— Teaching of the Reading of Literature 
EDN 601— Teaching of Composition 
EDN 671-Educational Research 

Other graduate level Education courses are also acceptable. 

IV. Balance of Courses 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by 
taking one-half of their required courses and one-half of their 
elective courses at each College. A guide to the location of the 
courses follows: 



68 



Savannah State College Armstrong State College 



ENG 502 


ENG 603 


ENG 607 


ENG 500 


ENG 605 


ENG 613 


ENG 503 


ENG 604 


ENG 608 


ENG 501 


ENG 609 


ENG 614 


ENG 602 


ENG 606 


ENG 610 


ENG 600 


ENG 611 


ENG 616 




ENG 612 


ENG 615 


ENG 601 







A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in 
the Education Department section of this bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Each candidate for the Master of Education degree with a 
concentration in English must pass a written comprehensive 
examination. The comprehensive examination will be based on 
the reading list in language and literature which must be secured 
by the student at the time of his matriculation. The student may 
choose to be examined under any reading list in force during the 
time of his enrollment. Copies of the reading list are available in 
the office of the Coordinator. For more specific information 
concerning the comprehensive examination, contact the 
Coordinator. 

The comprehensive examination covers three areas: 1) litera- 
ture before 1660; 2) literature after 1660; and 3) language. The 
separate examinations are to be taken in the course of the 
student's program, preferably before the last quarter. At least 
one of the tests in literature will include a question concerning 
bibliographical and research procedures. The student must pass 
all three examinations in order to receive his degree. After two 
unsuccessful attempts at any one part of the examination, a 
student may not apply to repeat that section for at least two 
quarters during which he may do guided study or take 
recommended courses in order to make up his deficiencies. In 
light of the comprehensive requirements, the student is strongly 
urged to take an additional course in linguistics. Except for the 
stipulation that he must wait at least two quarters if he fails any 
examination twice, there is no limit on the number of times that 
a student may take an examination. Examination results are 
designated Honors, Pass or Fail. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for 
Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning 
the proposed place, date and time of the examination and the 
composition of the committee. The result of the examination 
will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three 
days after the examination. 



69 



Graduate Courses in English 
ENGLISH 500. Special Topics ( (l-5)-0-(l-5) ). ASC. 

ENGLISH 501. Graduate Review. ASC. 

The graduate student will attend lectures and discussions in an 
undergraduate period course needed to fill a gap in his background. 
Graduate students will be required to do graduate level work beyond 
that required of undergraduates in the same course. 

ENGLISH 502. Graduate Review. SSC. 

The graduate student will attend lectures and discussions in ai 
undergraduate period course needed to fill a gap in his background. 
Graduate students will be required to do graduate level work beyon< 
that required of undergraduates in the same course. 

ENGLISH 503. Special Topics. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). SSC. 

ENGLISH 600. Literary Theory and Criticism. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The study and application of the three chief schools of mode] 
literary theory and criticism — formalistic, psychological, archetypj 
(Northrop Frye), with particular attention to the third — an< 
consideration of their origins in Aristotle, Dante, and Coleridge. 

ENGLISH 601. Literature: Its Intellectual Backgrounds. (5-0- 
ASC. 

A study of the climates of opinion and feeling in major liter* 
periods, particularly as these have been influenced by philosophies 
and religious ideas. 

ENGLISH 602. Descriptive Linguistics and Transformation; 
Grammar. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the English sound system, the system of won 
composition and transformational syntax. 

ENGLISH 603. Studies in Historical Linguistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A brief survey of the Indo-European background and the princip* 
developments in Old, Middle, and Modern English periods. 

ENGLISH 604. Studies in Chaucer. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 605. Studies in Shakespeare. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 606. Studies in Milton. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 607. Studies in American Ethnic Literature. (5-0- 
SSC. 

ENGLISH 608. Studies in American Literature. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 609. Studies in British Literature before 1660. (5-0- 
ASC. 

ENGLISH 610. Studies in British Literature After 1660. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 



70 



ENGLISH 611. Studies in Comparative Literature. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 612. Studies in the English Language. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 613. Studies in Genre. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 614. Special Studies; Independent or Seminar. 
((l-5)-0-(l-5)). ASC. 

ENGLISH 615. Special Studies: Independent or Seminar. 
((l-5)-0-(l-5)). SSC. 

ENGLISH 616. Studies in Literature After World War II. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FACULTY 

Dr. Elmer Dean, Department Head (SSC); Dr. Roger Warlick, 
Department Head (ASC). 

History: 

Dr. Black (SSC), Dr. Duncan (ASC), Dr. Gross (ASC), Dr. Lanier 
(ASC), Dr. Mclver (SSC), Dr. Simpson (SSC), and Dr. Williams 

(SSC). 

Political Science: 

Dr. Byers (SSC), Dr. Clark (ASC), Dr. Coyle (ASC), Dr. Harris 
(SSC), Dr. McCarthy (ASC), Dr. Newman (ASC), and Dr. Walton 

(SSC). 



Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in History and in Political Science 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate programs in history and in political 
science are: 

1. To increase the academic and professional skills, the com- 
petence and the enthusiasm of secondary teachers in history 
and political science and in social studies generally. 

2. To increase the teacher's knowledge and understanding of the 
nature and conditions of learning and the learner, at the same 



71 



time making the teacher aware of the major features and 
problems of secondary education in the American social order. 

3. To accomplish these objectives by working jointly in a 
situation reflective of the racial and social make-up of 
American society and, in so doing, to provide a context in 
which teachers themselves may develop personally as well as 
academically. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in history and in political 
science must satisfy all general admission requirements of the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program, including the requirement that the NTE 
Common and appropriate subject area examination or the GRE 
Aptitude and appropriate advanced area test be completed prior to 
full admission. The results of these examinations will then serve as a 
basis for academic advisement. 

Students must also satisfy a prerequisite of 15 quarter hours of 
undergraduate work in the major discipline before any course can be 
taken for graduate credit. 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Students who have earned graduate credits at one or more 
accredited institutions may, under certain circumstances, transfer a 
limited number of quarter hours of such credits to be applied toward 
the M.Ed, degree programs in history and political science. Such 
transfer of credits is handled on an individual basis and requires the 
written approval of the student's adviser and the Coordinator. 



ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the program in either history or 
political science, each student should contact the Coordinator to 
secure both an academic adviser and a professional education adviser. 
The former will be a member of the history or political science 
faculty, and the latter will be a member of the education faculty. As 
soon as he is notified of this assignment, the student should arrange 
for a joint conference with both of his advisers and begin planning 
his degree program under their guidance. Failure by the student to 
consult regularly with his advisers may greatly lengthen the time 



72 



necessary to complete the program. Each student should feel free to 
consult his advisers as often as is necessary and should plan to have at 
least one conference per quarter. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

A. Concentration in History. 

The typical history program for those students already holding 
a T-4 certificate in an appropriate field is outlined below: 

I. History Courses 25 quarter hours minimum 

II. Professional Education Courses . .10 quarter hours minimum 

EDN 621— Advanced Studies in Human Growth and 
Development or EDN 622— Nature and Conditions 
of Human Learning 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education 

III. Research Methods 5 quarter hours 

HIS 500-Historical Method 

or 
EDN 671— Educational Research 

IV. Approved Electives 20 quarter hours 

Total 60 hours minimum 

B. Concentration in Political Science. 

The typical political science program for those students 
already holding a T-4 certificate in an appropriate field is 
outlined below: 

Political science students must demonstrate competency in 
statistics or must take Math 220 (ASC) or Math 217 (SSC). These 
courses do not receive graduate credit. 

I. Political Science Courses 25 quarter hours minimum 

These courses must include 5 hours in each of the 
following areas : 

a. American government and public policy. 

b. Comparative politics. 

c. International relations and foreign policy. 

d. Political theory. 



73 



II. Professional Education Courses ■ ■ 10 Q uarter hours minimum 
Same as Professional Education Courses for History 

EDN 621 or EDN 622 and EDN 631 

III. Research Methods 5 quarter hours 

POS 600— Research Methods 

or 
EDN 671— Educational Research 

IV. Approved Electives 20 quarter hours 

Total 60 hours minimum 

C. Special program (for students without T-4 who wish to move 
directly to T-5 certification). Students without prior certification 
may need a total of 65-80 quarter hours to complete the M.Ed, 
program in either History or Political Science. 

I. Professional Education 40 quarter hours 

a. Foundations Courses 10 hours 

Examples: EDN 611, EDN 621 or 622, EDN 631. 

b. Methods and Curriculum 10 hours 

Example: EDN 641 and others 

c. Student teaching or equivalent on-the-job experience, 
workshops, etc 10 hours or more 

d. Electives 10 hours 

II. History or Political Science Courses 25 quarter hours 

See section below on "Use of Electives" for further 
information on hours in the major field. 

D. General Requirements. 

Use of Electives 

The flexibility provided by the 20 hours of "Approved 
Electives" normally makes it possible to meet the other program 
guidelines within a 60 hour total. But, students should be aware, 
for example, that counting both graduate and undergraduate 
class work, they are required to have a total of at least 30 hours in 
their major teaching area (i.e., American or European History, or 
American Government). There may also be areas where under- 
graduate preparation was weak or unavailable, such as pro- 
fessional education, non-western traditions, etc. Such problems 
can best be solved on an individual basis with the help of the 
appropriate faculty advisers. 

74 



Students should be aware that regardless of major, state 
certification criteria recommend that social studies teachers 
include in their programs preparation in the following: American 
history and government, conflicting ideologies, the modern world 
(social and physical setting), Western heritage, and non-Western 
traditions. 

In addition, students are reminded that combined graduate and 
undergraduate work in the area of American government and 
history should total at least 30 hours. 



E. Balance of Courses 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by 
taking one half of their required courses and one half of their 
elective courses at each of the two colleges. A guide to the 
location of the history and the political science courses follows. 
While the following list of courses is not equally divided between 
the two colleges, the student is reminded that he must take one 
half of his required courses and one half of his elective courses 
from each of the two colleges, choosing such courses from the 
offerings available at the two colleges. 



Savannah State College 



Armstrong State College 





History Courses 




HIS 501 


HIS 611 


HIS 500 


HIS 531 


HIS 505 


HIS 613 


HIS 502 


HIS 619 


HIS 517 


HIS 617 


HIS 514 


HIS 641 


HIS 534 


HIS 621 


HIS 515 


HIS 645 


HIS 547 


HIS 636 


HIS 516 




HIS 602 


HIS 640 






HIS 603 


HIS 650 






HIS 606 


HIS 680 






HIS 607 


HIS 681 


History 690/691 are offered at 


HIS 609 


HIS 695 


both Savannah State College and 


HIS 610 


HIS 696 


Armstrong State College. 




Political Science Courses 




POS 600 


POS 625 


POS 530 


POS 614 


POS 603 


POS 627 


POS 535 


POS 620 


POS 604 


POS 628 


POS 545 


POS 626 


POS 608 


POS 629 


POS 605 


POS 630 


POS 610 


POS 635 


POS 6Q6 


POS 640 


POS 615 


POS 642 


POS 611 




POS 616 


POS 649 






POS 619 


POS 680 


Political Science 690/691 are 


POS 621 


POS 681 


offered at be 


th Savannah State 


POS 623 


POS 683 


College and 


Armstrong State 


POS 624 


POS 684 


College. 





75 



A guide to the location of the Education courses is in the 
Education Section of this Bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

An integral part of the graduate experience is the achievement of a 
comprehensive understanding of the analytical skills and of the 
current state of knowledge and scholarship basic to one's field. It is 
the purpose of the Comprehensive Examination both to demonstrate 
this understanding and to aid in further synthesizing its many 
aspects. Thus, the examination itself should be in part a new 
experience, producing new insights and not merely a rehearsal of 
previous ones. 

Satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations, written 
and/or oral, will thus be required of all degree candidates. Candidates 
should notify their major professor and the Coordinator of the 
program of their readiness to be examined at the time they apply for 
the degree — i.e., no later than mid-term of their next to final 
quarter. At this time the specific fields and reading list to be covered 
will be defined, the make-up of the examining committee deter- 
mined, and the date of the exam set. The examination normally 
occurs before mid-term of the student's final quarter. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for 
Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the examination and the 
composition of the committee. The result of the examination will be 
reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after 
the examination. 

The Coordinator will notify the student regarding the result of 
the examinations. The examination papers and/or comments of the 
examining committee will become part of the student's permanent 
file in the Department, and the student may request a conference 
with his major professor and advisers for the purpose of reviewing 
the examination papers. 

A student may repeat the Comprehensive Examinations as many 
times as necessary to demonstrate the required level of competence. 

Graduate Courses in History 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is 
the general prerequisite that a student must have completed the 
equivalent of 15 hours of undergraduate work in History to become 



76 



eligible to take graduate work for credit toward the Master of 
Education degree in History. 

HISTORY 500. Historical Method. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research; 
treats problems of investigation, organization, and writing through 
discussion and actual research experience in local history. 

HISTORY 501. Seminar in Georgia History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A research seminar dealing with various aspects of Georgia's past 
with emphasis on original research and writing. 

HISTORY 502. United States: Colonial and Revolutionary. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement 
and growth of the English colonies of North America, the American 
triumph over France in the New World, the drastic change in British 
colonial policy and the rise of American opposition to it, the 
achievement of independence and the establishment of the United 
States under the Constitution. 

HISTORY 505. United States: 1914 to Present. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Covering the most recent period in U.S. History, the course 
emphasizes political, economic, and social issues. 

HISTORY 514. United States: Diplomatic History I. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from 
colonial times through the Civil War. 

HISTORY 515. United States: Diplomatic History II. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A continuation of History 514 to the present. 

HISTORY 516. United States: Constitutional History. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution 
of the United States. 

HISTORY 517. Reform Movements in American History. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A research and readings course designed to acquaint the student 
with the dynamics of American reformism. 

HISTORY 531. History of Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A survey of the social, cultural, economic, political, religious, and 
intellectual history of Latin America from colonial times to present. 

HISTORY 534. Contemporary Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Twentieth century influences that are producing socio-economic 
unrest in much of Latin America. 



77 



HISTORY 547. The French Revolution. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
France, with emphasis on the impact of the French Revolution and 
the career of Napoleon upon the major European nations. 

HISTORY 602. United States: Tyler to Lincoln. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An intensive investigation of the social, economic, political, and 
intellectual conditions in the United States between 1840 and 1860. 

HISTORY 603. United States: Nineteenth Century Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

A research seminar in the course and development of political 
movements in the United States during the Middle Period. 

HISTORY 606. United States: Afro-American History I. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A Seminar on the history of ideas, culture ideologies, and 
institutions that influenced Afro-Americans from the colonial period 
to 1860. 

HISTORY 607. United States: Afro-American History II. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar in Afro-American thought and institutions — a 
continuation of History 606. The course critically evaluates Afro- 
American culture during and following the civil war. 

HISTORY 609. History of Afro- American Higher Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The History of Afro-American Higher education from the 19th 
century to the present with emphasis on method and philosophy. 

HISTORY 610. United States: Economic History I. (5-0-5). SSC. 
The history, economic ideas, ideologies, practices, and institutions 
that have influenced Americans from the colonial period to 1860. 

HISTORY 611. United States: Economic History II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Post-1860 American economic history and institutions that have 
influenced Americans from the Civil War to the present. A 
continuation of History 610. 

HISTORY 613. Seminar in the Puritan Ethic. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the evolution and secularization of the Puritan ethic in 
American society. Special emphasis will be given to the theorists who 
created the ethic and to those thinkers who have attempted to 
humanize it. 

HISTORY 617. Seminar in Pre-1860 Euro-American Reform 
Movements. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Problems in Euro-American cultural, religious, intellectual, and 
institutional development with special emphasis on cultural 
nationalism, naturalism, Darwinism, romanticism, and humani- 
tarianism. 



78 



HISTORY 619. Studies in American Thought. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A reading and research course devoted to the examination of 
topics in the history of American thought. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. 

HISTORY 621. Far East in Modern Times. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The strategic economic, political, and ideological factors that 
shape the destinies of Far Eastern countries will be critically 
examined. The political actions of the dominant powers of the East, 
Japan, Communist China, and India, will be studied as well as those 
of the lesser nations, such as, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, 
Thailand, Burma, Afghanistan, Cambodia, Laos, and the Vietnams. 
The interplay of the United States and Europe with respect to the 
economic and political issues affecting the Far East will be 
high -lighted. 

HISTORY 636. European Diplomatic History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An intensive study into the origins and development of European 
diplomacy, the instruments of power, the interrelationship of 
diplomacy and military forces, the limits of national power, 
economic objectives, and the fundamentals of national objectives. 
Europe's special political and military role will be examined, as it 
applies to Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Austria, and 
Spain. The special impingements of American diplomacy on Euro- 
pean national interests will be studied, in complement with such 
international institutions as the League of Nations, United Nations, 
Common Market, and NATO. 

HISTORY 640. England: Tudor-Stuart Topics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional, 
and religious issues of English history, 1485-1660. Class concentra- 
tion will be directed to selected topics or periods which will be 
augmented by independent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 641. England: Restoration-Hanoverian Topics. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional, 
and religious issues of English history, 1660-1815. Class concentra- 
tion will be directed to selected topics or periods which will be 
augmented by independent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 645. Studies in Early Modern Europe. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Selected topics in XVI and XVII century European life will be 
studied, e.g. the religious controversies, geographical expansion and 
the scientific revolution. Heavy emphasis will be given independent 
research and presentations by the student. 

HISTORY 650. Topics in Modern European History. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World 
Wars. 

79 



HISTORY 680. Readings in American History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

HISTORY 681. Readings in European History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

HISTORY 690/691. Independent Study. (Credit Varies.) ASC and 
SSC. 

Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 695. American Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An extensive survey of the historiographical trends evident in the 
writing of American History with emphasis on major interpretations 
and the influence of major historians. 

HISTORY 696. European Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lectures and readings to illustrate the major developments in the 
study of the European past. 



Graduate Courses in Political Science 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is 
the general requirement that a student must have completed the 
equivalent of 15 hours of undergraduate work in Political Science to 
become eligible to take graduate work for credit toward the Master 
of Education degree in Political Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 530. Seminar in Empirical Political 
Thought. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A course primarily of readings centered on the analysis of the 
epistemological and methodological foundations of contemporary 
political and social science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 535. Origins of Totalitarianism. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

An analysis of the socio-psychological bases of modern totalitarian 
movements. Major emphasis will be placed on pre-World War II Nazi 
Germany. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 545. African Politics. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Designed to introduce students to African politics, the course is 
divided into three parts covering the colonial period — examining 
British, French, Belgian, and Portuguese rule; African governments 
immediately after independence; and the transition to military rule 
in some countries. Problems common to the key independent 
countries (e.g. Nigeria, Ghana, Tanzania, Zaire) are examined and 
also the National Liberation movements in Southern Rhodesia, 
South Africa, and the Portuguese colonies. 



80 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 600. Research Methods in Political 
Science. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course covers the different methodological approaches to 
political data, data gathering, and data analysis. It also gives an 
overview of the philosophy of science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 603. Public Policy. (5-0-5). 

Here an analysis is made of the way Public Policy is made, who 
influences it, and the varied techniques Political Scientist have 
developed to study it. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 604. Principles of Public Administration. 
(5-0-5). 

This course is to acquaint the student with the chief concepts, 
theories, ideas and models in Public Administration. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 605. Comparative State Government. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

A comparative study of the structure, function and political 
processes of state, county and other special government units in the 
United States. Special emphasis will be given to the states of Georgia, 
Florida, and South Carolina. Field studies will be utilized to gain 
first-hand knowledge whenever possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 606. Local Government. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the structure, function, and political processes of city 
and other local governments in the United States. Special attention 
will be given to the workings of city government in the state of 
Georgia in general and to the cities in the Savannah area in particular. 
Field studies will be utilized to gain first-hand knowledge whenever 
possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 608. Urban Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course surveys the theories, the approaches, models, and the 
techniques of political activity in the urban metro areas. In addition, 
it also reviews the proposals and solutions for urban reform. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 640. American Political Parties. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar which will consider the structural-functional nomencla- 
ture of American political parties as well as make analytical inquiry 
into their growth, development, aims, and primary concerns. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 611. American Presidency. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the Presidency, with the 
principal emphasis on the relations of the executive branch with the 
Congress and the Court system. Some attention will be given to the 
evolution of the Presidency to its present dominant position in the 
American political process. (Completion of a survey course in 
American History is desirable.) 



81 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 614. American Congress. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A detailed study of the legislative process in the national 
government with particular emphasis on executive-legislative rela- 
tions. Some comparisons will be made with the law-making processes 
of other nations. (Some background in American political and social 
history is desirable.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 615. American Supreme Court. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

A Seminar analyzing the key problems and issues in the judicial 
process: judicial behavior, judicial policy making, judicial biography, 
and the court in the political process. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 616. Black Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis is made in this course of the areas of specialization in 
Black Politics as well as the numerous political activities of the Black 
community. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 619. American Foreign Policy. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

This course will span the period from the American Revolution to 
the Vietnamese War. Areas of major interest will be America's early 
isolation, its emergence as an International power, participation in 
major wars, and as a primary force in the United Nations. The course 
will examine the relationship of the United States with the USSR, 
United Kingdom, Mainland China, and other world powers. This 
study will show the supporting roles of the U.S. Military, the CIA, 
AID, USIA, Peace Corps, and other agencies. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 620. Topics in International Relations. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Prerequisite: undergraduate work in the field or permission of the 
instructor. A seminar course ' with specific titles announced as 
offered. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 621. International Relations: Far East. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The politics, people, movements and ideologies are surveyed for 
the impact on Asia and the world. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 623. International Relations: Africa. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The diplomacy, alliances and internal politics of the Black African 
countries are analyzed and studied for trends and continuities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 624. USSR and Red China in Conflict. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course will consider and evaluate Chinese and Russian 
relations before and after the 1917 Communist Revolution. The 
causes of Sino-Soviet conflicts will be traced to their economic, 
political, strategic, as well as ideologue, will be compared with the 



82 



political, strategic, as well as ideological sources. The history of the 
break between the Soviet Union and the Peoples Republic of China 
and the implication of this hiatus for the security of the modern 
world will be critically examined. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 625. Communist China in World Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course stresses the international role of the Peoples Republic 
of China. The growth of China's Communist element is traced first 
through its tenuous relationship with Nationalist China and then as 
the successor to Nanking. Particular emphasis is given to the changing 
relations of Red China to the USSR, the United States, Japan, and 
the developing nations of Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. 
Communist China's interest in world revolution, cultural programs, 
and insurgencies are examined against its break with and distrust of 
the Soviet Union. Reasons are explored for the detente of China with 
the United States. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 626. Seminar in International Law. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

A detailed study of selected topics within the field of Interna- 
tional Law. Emphasis will be on wide reading, written reports and 
classroom discussion and analysis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 627. International Organizations. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

This course will analyze the roles and internal structures of the 
United Nations, the Common Market, NATO, the International 
Court, the Organization of American States, the World Bank, and 
other international organizations. Of special interest will be the 
particular influence of the United States in these organizations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 628. Communism, Capitalism, and Chris- 
tianity. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is a study of the origins of Communism, Capitalism, 
and Christianity and their interrelationship in the modern world. 
Students will explore the similarities and differences of the three 
factors in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. The effects of these 
forces will be studied as they impinged on various countries and on 
such dominant personalities as Joseph Stalin, Woodrow Wilson, Sun 
Yat Sen, De Gaulle, Francisco Franco, and John D. Rockefeller. Of 
special interest in this study will be such periods of intense 
Communist-Capitalistic relationship as the Post-World War I period, 
the epoch of Nazism, the "Cold War," and the Russo- American 
Detente. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 629. Contemporary Problems in Interna- 
tional Relations. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis of the major areas of conflict — or cooperation — in 
the international arena is made to highlight trends, patterns and 
continuities. 

83 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 630. World Ideological Movements. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

An analysis of the major ideological movements conditioning the 
mind of contemporary man. The course will focus primarily on 
democratic capitalism, fascism, socialism, and communism. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 635. Black Political Thought. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A study of the major thinkers in the Black community and the 
effects of their ideas on the concepts of freedom, liberalism, 
conservatism, state, obligation, consent, etc., for the purpose of its 
intellectual value and comparative possibilities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 640. Comparative Political Analysis. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

This course is mainly theoretical. It deals with the various 
approaches, concepts, and methodologies that are being used in the 
analysis of comparative politics, viz: the traditional approach 
(formal-legal), group theory of politics, systems analysis, structural- 
functional analysis, communications theory, decision-making theory, 
game theory, etc. At the same time, each approach is examined as it 
is used in comparing the politics of various countries. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 642. Latin American Politics. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 

A survey of the key Latin American countries and their politics is 
made for insight, comparison, and prospects. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 649. Revolutions and Revolutionaries. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course addresses itself to the causes and characteristics of 
revolutions, from the American Revolution to the recent socia 
revolution of Blacks, women, and minorities. Each major revolution 
selected will be examined concerning the basic reasons for the 
upheaval, the leadership, and the benefits and losses incurred by the 
revolt. The course will specifically treat the French Revolution, the 
revolutions of 1848, the Risorgimento, the Meiji Restoration, 
overthrow of the Ching Dynasty, Jose Rizal and the Philippines, the 
Irish problem, Kenyatta and the Mau Mau and other revolutions. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 680. Readings in American Government. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 681. Readings in American Politica 
Thought. (5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 683. Readings in Political Theory. (5-0-5) 
SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 684. Readings in Comparative Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 



84 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 690/691. Independent Study. (Credit 
Varies.) ASC and SSC. 

Admission by approval of the instructor and the Departmental 
Coordinator. 



MATHEMATICS 



FACULTY 

Mr. J. B. Clemmons, Department Head, (SSC), Dr. Richard M. 
Summerville, Department Head, (ASC), Dr. Black (SSC), Dr. 
Engelhardt (SSC), Dr. Hansen (ASC), Dr. Hinkel (ASC), Dr. A. 
Hudson (ASC), Dr. S. Hudson (SSC), Dr. Kilhefner (ASC), Dr. Lahr 
(SSC), Dr. Munson (ASC), Dr. Netherton (ASC), and Dr. Shipley 
(ASC). 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Mathematics 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Mathematics of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program, in cooperation with the Department of Education, offers a 
program of study leading to the degree of Master of Education. The 
objectives of this program are: 

1. To enhance the academic and professional competence of 
mathematics teachers in secondary schools — at both the junior 
and senior high school levels; 

2. To develop the skills, confidence, and understanding that such 
teachers need in order to meet the present scientific and 
technological challenges of modern society; 

3. To acquaint secondary mathematics teachers with the various 
major branches of mathematics which are active in contemp- 
orary research and relevant to the various modern secondary 
mathematics curricula; and 

4. To familiarize teachers of mathematics with those persons who 
have contributed significantly to the field, as well as with 
prominent mathematicians and educators currently working in 
the area of improving the teaching and understanding of the 
subject. 

85 



In addition to its own degree program, the department also offers 
coursework designed to support the other graduate degree programs 
of the Joint Graduate Studies Program and to meet the needs of all 
graduate students in the areas of mathematics, mathematical physics, 
mathematics education, statistics, and computer science. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PLACEMENT 

Students entering the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics must 
satisfy the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program, including the requirements related to either the 
"common" part of the National Teachers Examination (NTE) or the 
"aptitude" part of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). In 
addition, either the mathematics "area" part of the NTE or the 
mathematics "advanced" part of the GRE must be taken prior to 
admission as a degree-seeking student. Students should consult with 
the Mathematics Coordinator or the Graduate Office for further 
information. 

Subsequent to his admission, but prior to enrolling in his first 
mathematics course (which, ordinarily, is Mathematics 501), each 
student must take the Graduate Mathematics Diagnostic Test 
(GMDT). The GMDT has the purpose of allowing some students to 
exempt Mathematics 501 upon scoring at a very high level. However, 
if a sufficiently low score is made on the GMDT, the student is not 
allowed to take Mathematics 501 until he meets requirements set for 
him by the Examinations Committee of the Joint Graduate 
Mathematics Faculty. These requirements normally consist of satis- 
factory performance in appropriate undergraduate course(s) and/or 
on subsequent re-examination. 

Each entering student should contact the Mathematics Coordi- 
nator of the Joint Graduate Studies Program as early as possible for 
details concerning the GMDT and should arrange with the Coordi- 
nator to take the GMDT at its first administration after his admission 
to the program. Failure to do so can result in severely retarding the 
student's academic progress. 



ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the M.Ed, degree program in 
mathematics, each student will be assigned both an academic adviser 
and a professional adviser. The former will be a member of the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics Faculty, and the latter a member of the Joint 



86 



Graduate Education Faculty. As soon as he is notified of this 
assignment, the student should arrange for a conference with each of 
his advisers and begin planning his degree program under their 
guidance. The student will find that his advisers can provide him with 
the kind of counsel and information which will make possible 
realistic planning, informed and personalized judgments, and, hence, 
a maximally valuable graduate education. Each student should feel 
free to consult with his advisers as often as is necessary and should 
plan to have at least one conference per quarter with each. 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

All student requests for transfer of graduate mathematics credit 
will be evaluated by the Transfer Credit Committee of the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics Faculty. A formal student request should 
include a list of the courses to be considered, a list of the texts used 
for each course, and a catalogue containing a description of each 
course. 

In reaching a decision the committee will adhere to the philosophy 
that the transfer of graduate credit is a privilege to be granted only 
when there is no doubt that the course under consideration is 
comparable in quality and content to one in the Joint Mathematics 
Graduate Program. To properly determine these factors, the commit- 
tee may at its option (a) request a personal interview with the 
student to discuss course content and/or (b) require a written 
examination to test this content. 

Transfer credit is also subject to the following regulations: 

1. Each course must have been taken in an accredited graduate 
program. 

2. Each course grade must be B or better. 

3. Each credit must have been earned within the past five years. 

4. A maximum of ten (10) quarter hours of transfer credit in 
mathematics may be applied to a degree. 



87 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete a sequence of courses which conforms to 
the following requirements: 

I. Education Courses (20 quarter hours): To include Education 
631, either Education 621 or 622, and 10 quarter hours of 
approved electives in Education. 

II. Mathematics Courses (35 quarter hours): To include Mathe- 
matics 501, 502, 505, 510, 530, and 10 quarter hours of 
approved electives chosen from the following courses: Mathe- 
matics 605, 610, 615, 620, 630, 635, 640, 655, 660, 670, 691, 
and 692. It is strongly recommended that 501, 502, 505, 510 
and 530 be completed before taking other courses. 

III. Elective Courses (5 quarter hours): To be taken in Mathematics, 
Education or a suitable third field with the prior approval of the 
student's advisers. 

IV. Balance of Courses: Students will fulfill the balance of courses 
requirement by taking one-half of their required courses and 
one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows: 



Savannah State College 

MATH 501, MATH 605, MATH 655 
MATH 505, MATH 635, MATH 670 
MATH 594, MATH 640, MATH 691 



Armstrong State College 

MATH 502, MATH 610, MATH 631 
MATH 510, MATH 615, MATH 66( 
MATH 530, MATH 620, MATH 69! 
MATH 592 



A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the 
Education Department section of this Bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Certain courses in the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics are 
designated as "core" courses because they contain many of the 
concepts most basic and useful to a teacher in junior or senior high 
school. The core courses are Mathematics 501, 502, 505, 510, and 
530. 

An integral part of the graduate program is the attainment of the 
kind of comprehensive understanding of these concepts which can be 
achieved by their re-examination in the light of experience and 
insight obtained from the completion of the courses in the program. 



88 



The mathematics graduate faculty also considers that the 
crystallization of knowledge to be gained from remastering funda- 
mental topics with the benefit of a broadened viewpoint is of great 
value. 

Accordingly, each recipient of the Master of Education degree in 
Mathematics is required to have successfully demonstrated the 
attainment of such knowledge and such understanding on a written 
comprehensive examination. The following regulations govern the 
administration of the comprehensive examination in mathematics. 

1. Comprehensive Examinations will be held during the Fall and 
Spring Quarters, on the third Monday of November and April, 
respectively. The Coordinator shall notify the student and the 
Deans for Graduate Studies, at least ten days prior to the 
examination, concerning the place and time of day of the 
examination. 

2. Students must register with the Mathematics Coordinator 
stating their intention to take the Comprehensive Examination. 
The deadline for registering for the Comprehensive Examina- 
tion is two months before the date of the Examination. The 
registering students will receive within one week of this 
deadline the list of topics for which they will be responsible on 
the examination. 

3. The Examinations Committee of the Joint Graduate Mathe- 
matics Faculty will be responsible for constructing exams, 
administering them, grading them, and making recommenda- 
tions to the Joint Graduate Mathematics Faculty concerning 
success or failure on the examinations. The Joint Graduate 
Mathematics faculty shall make the final decision on success or 
failure. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the 
examination. 

4. The Mathematics Coordinator will notify the examined stu- 
dents on the results of the Comprehensive Exams. The 
examined students may request a conference with their faculty 
advisers for the purpose of discussing and reviewing the 
examination papers. The examination papers will remain in the 
advisement files of the student's advisers until the end of the 
subsequent quarter. 

5. A student may repeat the Comprehensive Examination as many 
times as he finds necessary to demonstrate the required level of 
competence. 

89 



Graduate Courses in Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS 501. Calculus for Graduate Students. (5-0-5). 
SSC. Prerequisite: Students must pass the Graduate Mathematics 
Diagnostic Test prior to enrolling. 

A review of the fundamental concepts and applications of analytic 
geometry and the differential and integral calculus of one and several 
variables. (May be exempted by examination.) 

MATHEMATICS 502. Foundations of Mathematics. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 501. 

An intensive examination of the fundamental ideas of modern 
axiomatic mathematics. Special attention is given to elementary 
logic, sets, relations, functions, and a systematic construction of the 
real number system. 

MATHEMATICS 505. Analysis I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. SSC. 

A careful re-examination of the elements of differential and 
integral calculus; limits, continuity, the derivative, implicit functions, 
inverse functions, the indefinite and definite integral, the funda- 
mental theorem of calculus; applications in science and technology. 

MATHEMATICS 510. Algebra I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. ASC. 

A brief survey of abstract and linear algebra, including topics from 
group theory, vector spaces and matrices. 

MATHEMATICS 530. Geometry I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. ASC. 

A transformation approach to the study of Euclidean, hyperbolic 
and elliptic geometry; together with its application in secondary 
school curriculum. 

MATHEMATICS 592. Modern Mathematics for Elementary 
Teachers. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. ASC. 

Content concentration emphasizing the rigor, mathematical lang- 
uage, and subject matter to be taught in the elementary school. 

MATHEMATICS 594. Statistics for Education and the Social 
Sciences. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. 

Graphic representation and data reduction; measures of central 
tendency and variability; distributions; correlation; regression; hypo- 
thesis testing. Primary emphasis is upon the development of 
statistical skills necessary for the conduct and interpretation of 
statistical research. 

MATHEMATICS 605. Analysis II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 505. SSC. 

A continuation of Analysis I; Taylor's theorem, infinite series, 
powet series, improper integrals, multiple integrals; applications in 
science and technology. 

90 



MATHEMATICS 610. Algebra II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 510. ASC. 

A continuation of Algebra I with topics from groups, rings, and 
fields. 

MATHEMATICS 615. Number Theory. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 502. ASC. 

Topics from number theory including divisibility, congruences, 
Diophantine problems, number-theoretic functions, classical con- 
struction problems. 

MATHEMATICS 620. Probability and Mathematical Statistics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 505. ASC. 

The basic concepts of probability and statistics. Random experi- 
ment, event space, probability, random variable, conditional proba- 
bility, independence, basic distributions, limit theorems, sampling, 
estimation, tests of hypotheses. 

MATHEMATICS 630. Geometry II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 530. ASC. 

A continuation of Geometry I including a study of similarities 
leading to some classical theorems of geometry. 

MATHEMATICS 635. Topology. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. SSC. 

The basic concepts of topology; topological spaces, continuous 
functions, homeomorphisms, quotients, products, connectedness, 
compactness, separation axioms, metrizability. 

MATHEMATICS 640. Applied Analysis and Mathematical Physics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 505. SSC. 

Formulation of equations from scientific and technological princi- 
ples and the solution of these equations. Problems will be chosen 
from the physical and biological sciences, from engineering and from 
business and economics. 

MATHEMATICS 655. Computer Science and Numerical Methods. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

Topics in computer science and numerical methods, to include 
various applications of computing in mathematics and data process- 
ing. 

MATHEMATICS 660. Mathematical Logic. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 502. ASC. 

Topics include symbolization of sentences, and the propositional 
and first order predicate calculi (including the completeness 
theorems). If time permits, cardinal and ordinal numbers will be 
discussed. 

MATHEMATICS 670. History and Philosophy of Mathematics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

A survey of the development of mathematics and a study of 
formalism, intuitionism, and logicism. 

91 



MATHEMATICS 691. Topics in Mathematics for the Junior High 
School I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

A detailed examination of the content of various modern 
programs in mathematics for the junior high school. Special attention 
is given to a development of the theoretical foundations underlying 
such content and to the relevance of the content in other areas of a 
student's education. 

MATHEMATICS 692. Topics in Mathematics for the Junior High 
School II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 691. ASC. 

A survey of topics from finite mathematics including combina- 
tions, permutations, probability and statistics. The computer will be 
used as a tool for solving problems in these areas. 





92 



INDEX 

Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Standing 26 

Adding Courses 26 

Administrative Officers 7 

Admissions, General Requirements 20 

Procedures 23 

Types of 21 

Advisement 24 

Balance of Courses 29 

Biology, Graduate Courses in 48 

M.Ed. Degree in 46 

Board of Regents, Members of 6 

Staff of 6 

Business Administration, Graduate Courses in 37 

Master's Degree in 32 

Business Education, Graduate Courses in 44 

M.Ed. Degree in 39 

Candidacy for Degree 29 

CATES Courses 27 

Chemistry, Graduate Courses in 54 

M.Ed. Degree in 52 

Class Regulations 25 

Course Load 26 

Degree Requirements, Summary , 30 

Degrees Offered 28 

Dropping Courses 26 

Education, Graduate Courses in 61 

Programs in 57 

Elementary Education, M.Ed. Degree in 57 

English, Graduate Courses in 70 

M.Ed. Degree in 67 

EPDA Reading Institute Courses 64 

Exceptional Children, Degree Program in 60 

Graduate Courses in 65 

Faculty 9 

Fees 17 

Financial Assistance 19 

Grades 25 

Graduate Council 8 

Graduate Courses, Identification of 25 

Graduate Departments, Heads of 7 

Graduate Program Coordinators 31 

Graduation, Application for 30 

History, Graduate Courses in 77 

M.Ed. Degree in 71 

93 



History of Joint Graduate Studies Program 15 

Housing 19 

Joint Graduate Studies Program, 

Administration of 16 

History of 15 

Organization of 16 

Purpose of 15 

Mathematics, Graduate Courses in 90 

M.Ed. Degree in 85 

Political Science, Graduate Courses in 80 

M.Ed. Degree in 71 

Probation 26 

Refunds of Fees 18 

Requirements for Master's Degree, General 28 

Residence Requirements for Degree 29 

Residency Requirements, Georgia 17 

Special Education, Graduate Courses in 65 

M.Ed. Degree in 60 

Student Responsibilities 24 

Teacher Certification 30 

Time Limitation, Degree Programs 28 

Transfer of Credit 24 

Veterans Benefits 19 

Withdrawal from Classes 26 



94 



A 

ssc 
c 




Catalogue and General Bulletin 
Joint Graduate Studies Program 
VANNAH STATE COLLEGE and ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 
1976-1977 



BULLETIN 

of 

THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

OF 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE-ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Units of the University System of Georgia 

1976-1977 



The statements set forth in this Catalogue are for informational 
purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract 
between a student and this institution. 

While the provisions of this Catalogue will ordinarily be applied as 
stated, Savannah State College and Armstrong State College reserve 
the right to change any provision listed in this Catalogue, including 
but not limited to academic requirements for graduation, without 
actual notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to 
keep students advised of any such changes. Information on changes 
will be available in the Graduate Office at .Savannah State College 
and the Graduate Office at Armstrong State College. It is especially 
important that each student note that it is his/her responsibility to 
keep himself/herself apprised of current graduation requirements for 
his/her particular degree program. 

Armstrong State College and Savannah State College are in 
compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and do not 
discriminate on the basis of sex, race, creed, or national origin. 



CONTENTS 



Academic Calendar — 1976-77 4 

Governing Board and Staff of the 

University System of Georgia 6 

Administrative Officers of the 

Joint Graduate Studies Program 8 

Heads of the Graduate Departments 8 

The Graduate Council 9 

The Graduate Faculty 10 

History, Purpose, and Organization 15 

Fees, Refunds, and Financial Assistance 17 

Admission to Graduate Study 20 

Academic Regulations 25 

Degrees and General Degree Requirements 31 

Departments: Programs and Courses 35 



Business Administration 36 

M.B.A. Program 

M.Ed., Business Education 

Biology 49 

M.Ed., Biology 

Chemistry 56 

M.Ed., Chemistry 

Education 60 

M.Ed., Elementary Education 

M.Ed., Early Childhood Education 

M.Ed., Special Education — Behavior Disorders 

English 74 

M.Ed., English 

History and Political Science 78 

M.Ed., History 

M.Ed., Political Science 

Mathematics 92 

M.Ed., Mathematics 

Index 100 



1976 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 1112 13 14 


7 8 9 10 1112 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 192021 


141516171819 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 192021 22 2324 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18192021 22 2324 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 1112 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 1112 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 T 5 16 17 


15 16 17 18 192021 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 192021 22 2324 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


30 31 








SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 1112 13 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


141516171819 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


192021 22 232425 


17 18 192021 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


192021 22 232425 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

31 


28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 



1977 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


i 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 1112 


6 7 8 9 101112 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


9 10 1112 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16W18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


1011 1213 14 1516 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


1718192021 22 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 








MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 1112 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 1112 13 


1516171819 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


141516171819 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


192021 22 232425 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 2 3 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 1112 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 101112 1314 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 192021 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 192021 22 2324 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1976-1977 



APRIL 



30 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1976 

Last day to file applications for graduation at end of 
Summer Quarter. 



JUNE 



15 Registration — Tuesday. 

16 Classes begin — Wednesday. 
18 Last day to register for credit 



Friday. 



JULY 5 Holiday -Monday. 

8 Mid-term — Thursday. 

8 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

19-23 Preregistration for Fall Quarter. 

AUGUST 13 Last day of classes — Friday. 

16-18 Examinations — Monday-Wednesday. 

18 Graduation — Wednesday. 



FALL QUARTER, 1976 

SEPTEMBER 21 Registration — Tuesday. 
23 Classes begin — Thursday. 
27 Last day to register for credit — 



Monday. 



NOVEMBER 1 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

1 Mid-term — Monday. 

15-19 Preregistration for Winter Quarter. 

24-26 Thanksgiving Holidays (begin at 12:30 P.M. 
November 24.) 

DECEMBER 3 Last day of classes — Friday. 

6-8 Examinations — Monday-Wednesday. 

9 Christmas vacation begins — Thursday. 



WINTER QUARTER, 1977 

JANUARY 3 Registration — Monday. 

4 Classes being — Tuesday. 
6 Last day to register for credit — Thursday. 
31 Last day to file application for graduation at end of 
Spring Quarter — Monday. 



FEBRUARY 7 Mid-term — Monday. 

7 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
21-25 Preregistration for Spring Quarter. 



MARCH 14 Last day of classes — Monday. 

16-18 Examinations — Friday. 
21-24 Spring recess — Monday-Thursday. 



SPRING QUARTER, 1977 

MARCH 25 Registration — Friday. 

28 Classes begin — Monday. 

30 Last day to register for credit — Wednesday. 



APRIL 



29 Last day to file application for graduation at end of 
Summer Quarter — Friday. 



MAY 



2 Mid-term — Monday. 

2 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
16-20 Preregistration for Summer Quarter. 



JUNE 



3 Last day of classes — Friday. 
6-8 Examinations — Monday-Wednesday. 
8 Graduation. 



JUNE 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1977 

14 Registration — Tuesday. 

15 Classes begin — Wednesday. 

17 Last day to register for credit — Friday. 



JULY 



18-22 



Holiday — Monday. 

Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

Mid-term — Friday. 

Preregistration for the Fall Quarter. 



AUGUST 12 Last day of classes — Friday. 

15-17 Examinations — Monday-Wednesday. 
17 Graduation. 



SEPTEMBER 


21 




26 




27 


OCTORER 


31 




31 


NOVEMBER 


24 




25 


DECEMBER 


5 




7-9 




12 



FALL QUARTER, 1977 

Registration — Wednesday. 

Classes begin — Monday. 

Last day to register for credit — Tuesday. 

Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
Mid-term — Monday. 



24- Thanksgiving Holidays (begin at 12:30 P.M. on 
November 23). 



Last day of classes — Monday. 
Examinations — Wednesday-Friday. 
Christmas Vacation begins — Monday. 



GOVERNING BOARD, 
ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY 



MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES A. HARRIS, Chairman Ocilla 

JOHN A. BELL, JR., Vice Chairman Dublin 

RUFUS B. COODY, Vienna 

ERWIN A. FRIEDMAN Savannah 

JESSE HILL, JR Atlanta 

MILTON JONES Columbus 

JAMES D. MADDOX Rome 

ELRIDGE W. MCMILLAN Atlanta 

CHARLES T. OXFORD Albany 

LAMAR R. PLUNKETT Bowdon 

JOHN R. RICHARDSON Conyers 

JOHN H. ROBINSON, III Americus 

P. R. SMITH Winder 

DAVID H. TISINGER Carrollton 

SAM A. WAY, III Hawkinsville 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 



STAFF OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR Chancellor 

JOHN O. EIDSON Vice Chancellor 

JOHN W. HOOPER Associate Vice Chancellor 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretary 

SHEALY E. McCOY Vice Chancellor— Fiscal 

Affairs and Treasurer 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Vice Chancellor— Construction 

and Physical Plant 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor— Research 

JOSEPH C. HAMMOCK Vice Chancellor 

Academic Development 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR Vice Chancellor— Services 

HARRY B. O'REAR Vice Chancellor— Health Affairs 

JAMES L. CARMON Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Computing Systems 

HASKIN R. POUNDS Assistant Vice Chancellor 

MARY ANN HICKMAN Assistant Vice Chancellor— Per onnel 

ROBERT M. JOINER Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Communications 



M. COY WILLIAMS Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Academic Development 

HARRY H. MURPHY, JR Director of Public Information 

L. HARLAN DAVIS Director, Interinstitutional Programs 

in International Affairs 




ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF 
THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

President 
Prince A. Jackson, Jr. Henry L. Ashmore 

Dean of the College 
Thomas H. Byers H. Dean Propst 

Associate Dean for Graduate Studies 
James A. Eaton Joseph V. Adams 

Comptroller 
Prince Mitchell Jule R. Stanfield 

Registrar 
John B. Clemmons George Hunnicutt 

Librarian 
Andrew J. McLemore George Sloan 



HEADS OF THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENTS 

Biology 
Margaret C. Robinson Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. 

Business Administration 
Mary C. Torian Emory H. Richards 

Chemistry 
Willie G. Tucker Henry E. Harris 

Education 
Thelma M. Harmond William W. Stokes 

English 
Luetta C. Milledge Hugh Pendexter, III 

Mathematics 
John B. Clemmons Richard M. Summerville 

History and Political Science 
Elmer J. Dean Roger K. Warlick 



THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

The members of the Graduate Council include, in addition to the 
Presidents, Deans, Librarians and Heads of Graduate Departments 
named above, the graduate faculty members and graduate students 
listed below: 



1975-1976 

Herbert O'Keefe, representing the Business Administration 

faculty. 
Laurent J. Guillou, representing the Biology faculty. 
Kamalakar Raut, representing the Chemistry faculty. 
Paul E. Ward, representing the Education faculty. 
George O. O'Neill, representing the English faculty. 
Osmos Lanier, representing the History and Political Science 

faculty. 
Sigmund Hudson, representing the Mathematics faculty. 
Charles Holmes — Student. 
Jane Perlmutter — Student. 

1976-1977 

Orange Hall, representing the Business Administration faculty. 
K. G. Nambiar, representing the Biology faculty. 
Paul Robbins, representing the Chemistry faculty. 
Frankie Ellis, representing the Education faculty. 
Robert I. Strozier, representing the English faculty. 

, representing the History and Political Science 

faculty. 
Richard Munson, representing the Mathematics faculty. 

, Student. 

, Student. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 
JOHN C. ADAMS, Ed.D., Florida State University, Education (SSC) 

JOSEPH V. ADAMS, Ph.D., University of Alabama, Psychology 
(ASC) 

STEPHEN AGYEKUM, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 
(SSC) 

HAYWARD ANDERSON, D.B.A., Harvard University, Business 
Administration (SSC) 

ADELINE Z. BARBER, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 
(ASC) 

JIMMY B. BENSON, Ph.D., Cornell University, Biology (SSC) 

RONALD J. BEUMER, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Biology 
(ASC) 

SARVAN K. BHATIA, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

NANCY V. BLAND, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

BL ANTON BLACK, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Political Science 
(SSC) 

JOHN BREWER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Chemistry (ASC) 

KENT BROOKS, Ph.D., George Washington University, English 
(ASC) 

CLIFFORD BURGESS, Ed.D., Auburn University, Education (SSC) 

THOMAS H. BYERS, Ph.D., Ball State University, Political Science 

(SSC) 

O. CARVER BYRD, Ph.D., Georgia State University, Business 
Administration (SSC) 

C. P. G. CHI, Ph.D., Wayne State University, Mathematics (ASC) 

ROSS L. CLARK, Ph.D., Tulane University, Political Science (ASC) 

JOHN COCHRAN, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (SSC) 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, Ph.D., Florida State University, Political 
Science (ASC) 

OSCAR C. Di*UB, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Biology 

(ASC) 

ELMER J. DEAN, Ed.D., Columbia University, History and Political 
Science (SSC) 

JOHN DUNCAN, Ph.D., Emory University, History (ASC) 



10 



THOMAS R. EASON, Ph.D., University of Mississippi, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

JAMES A. EATON, Ed.D., Columbia University, Education (SSC) 

FRANKIE ELLIS, Ed.D., University of Texas, Education (SSC) 

JACOB ENGELHARDT, Ph.D., New York University Mathematics 
(SSC) 

STANLEY ETERSQUE, Ed.D., West Virginia University, 
Mathematics (ASC) 

IDA J. GADSDEN, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Education 

(SSC) 

JIMMIE F. GROSS, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (ASC) 

LAURENT J. GUILLOU, JR., Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 
Biology (ASC) 

ORANGE HALL, Ph.D., University of Florida, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

THELMA M. HARMOND, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Education 
(SSC) 

JOHN R. HANSEN, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Mathematics 
(ASC) 

HENRY E. HARRIS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, 
Chemistry (ASC) 

LAWRENCE HARRIS, Ph.D., University Santo Tomas, Manila, 
History and Political Science (SSC) 

JERALINE HARVEN, Ed.D., Indiana University, Business 
Education (SSC) 

JOHN S. HINKEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Mathematics 
(ASC) 

JOHN HOUSTON, Ph.D., Purdue University, Mathematics (SSC) 

ANNE L. HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University, Mathematics (ASC) 

SIGMUND HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University, Mathematics (SSC) 

FRISSELL R. HUNTER, Ph.D., State University of Iowa, Biology 
(SSC) 

JEFFREY JAMES, Ph.D., Howard University, Chemistry (SSC) 

JAMES LAND JONES, Ph.D., Tulane University, English (ASC) 

DALE Z. KILHEFNER, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 
Mathematics (ASC) 



11 



JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, Ph.D., Columbia University, English (ASC) 

PULLABHOTIA V. KRISHNAMURTI, Ph.D., Texas A. and M. 
University, Biology (SSC) 

MICHAEL A. LABURTIS, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

MILDRED W. LANDRUM, Ph.D., Georgia State University, 
Business Education (ASC) 

JOSEPH LANE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Psychology (ASC) 

CORNELIA V. LAWSON, Ed.D., University of Arkansas, Educa tion 

(SSC) 

MARGARET LAWSON, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, English 
(ASC) 

CHARKS LASKA, Ph.D., Syracuse University, Mathematics (ASC) 

GERARD F. LENTINI, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 
(ASC) 

ELIZABETH LUNZ, Ph.D., Tulane University, English (SSC) 

ISIAH McIVER, Ph.D., Loyola University, History (SSC) 

MICHAEL K. MAHER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

JOHN C. MCCARTHY, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Political 
Science (ASC) 

MANCHERY P. MENON, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Chemistry 
(SSC) 

LUETTA C. MILLEDGE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English 

(SSC) 

RICHARD E. MUNSON, Ph.D., Rutgers University, Mathematics 
(ASC) 

K. G. NAMBIAR, Ph.D., Texas A. & M. University, Biology (SSC) 

JAMES S. NETHERTON, Ph.D., University of Virginia, Mathematics 
(ASC) 

S. LLOYD NEWBERRY, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 
(ASC) 

JOHN F. NEWMAN, Ph.D., University of Florida, Political Science 
(ASC) 

HERBERT O'KEEFE, Ph.D., Georgia State University, Accounting 
(SSC) 



12 



GEORGE O. O'NEILL, Ph.D., University of Southern California, 
English (SSC) 

ROBERT M. PATTERSON, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, History 
(ASC) 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, English 
(ASC) 

ALLEN L. PINGEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Biology 
(ASC) 

H. DEAN PROPST, Ph.D., Peabody College, English (ASC) 

KAMALAKAR RAUT, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Chemistry 
(SSC) 

STEVE YOUNG RHEE, Ph.D., University of Missouri, History 
(ASC) 

EMORY H. RICHARDS, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

PAUL E. ROBBINS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, 
Chemistry (ASC) 

A. DORIS ROBINSON, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Education 
(SSC) 

MARGARET C. ROBINSON, Ph.D., Washington University, Biology 

(SSC) 

HERMAN SARTOR, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Education 
(SSC) 

CHARLES T. SHIPLEY, Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Ma thematics 
(ASC) 

RICHARD SIMENSEN, Ph.D., University of Maryland, Education 
(ASC) 

JOHN E. SIMPSON, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (SSC) 

HARPAL SINGH, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Biology (SSC) 

R. B. SINGH, Ph.D., Patna University, Business Administration 
(SSC) 

STEVEN SMITH, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, History (SSC) 

JACQUELYN STEPHENS, Ed.D., Oklahoma University, Education 
(SSC) 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, Ed.D., University of Florida, Education 
(ASC) 



13 



CEDRIC STRATTON, Ph.D., Birbeck College, London, England, 
Chemistry (ASC) 

ROBERT I. STROZIER, Ph.D., Florida State University, English 
(ASC) 

RICHARD SUMMERVILLE, Ph.D., Syracuse University, 
Mathematics (ASC) 

JOSEPH W. SUMNER, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 
Education (SSC) 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Biology (ASC) 

MARY C. TORI AN, Ed.D., New York University, Business 
Administration (SSC) 

WILLIE G. TUCKER, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Chemistry 
(SSC) 

HANES WALTON, Ph.D., Howard University, History (SSC) 

PAUL E. WARD, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

ROGER K. WARLICK, Ph.D., Boston University, History (ASC) 

E. K. WILLIAMS, Ph.D., New York University, History (SSC) 

BERNARD L. WOODHOUSE, Ph.D., Howard University, Biology 

(SSC) 



14 



HISTORY PURPOSE 
AND ORGANIZATION 



HISTORY 

Graduate Studies in Savannah were initiated at the beginning of 
the summer quarter 1968, when Savannah State College, with the 
approval of the Board of Regents, began offering courses leading to 
the degree of Master of Science in Elementary Education. The 
program operated as an independent program for thirteen quarters, 
enrolling well over two hundred students. It was approved by both 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Georgia 
State Board of Education. Seventy-five persons received master's 
degrees under this program. 

Beginning with the fall quarter of 1971, Savannah State College 
joined with Armstrong State College to offer a joint program of 
graduate work. The combined faculties, library holdings, and 
facilities of the two colleges made possible the expansion of the 
graduate program to include a master's degree in business 
administration as well as the program in elementary education. In the 
spring of 1972, the Board of Regents approved the addition of 
secondary options in the Master of Education program. The Joint 
Graduate Studies Program has been fully accredited by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools, with its degree programs in 
Education approved by the Georgia State Department of Education. 



PURPOSE 

The philosophical base of the Joint Graduate Studies Program is 
an affirmation of the dignity and worth of the individual. Implicit in 
this philosophy is a realization that modern man must be productive, 
articulate, and proactive. The Program is dedicated to service 
through: educational programs, community involvement, and faculty 
and student research, scholarship and creativity. By offering 
advanced preparation to those who professionally serve in the public 
schools, the Joint Graduate Studies Program contributes to the 
development of teachers who possess the qualities of character, 
commitment, and professional promise, and through these teachers, 
to the children they serve. By offering advanced professional training 
in management and administration, the Program serves individuals 
for positions of responsibility in business, industry, government, and 
education. 



15 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Joint Graduate Studies Program is designed to insure the 
equal involvement of the two Colleges in the administration of the 
program and the instruction offered within the program. Students 
are required to take one-half of the courses in their degree programs 
at Savannah State College and one-half of the courses at Armstrong 
State College. The graduate degrees, bearing the signatures of both 
Presidents, are awarded jointly by the two Colleges. The location of 
the graduation ceremonies alternates between the two Colleges. 

The policy-making body for the Joint Graduate Studies Program is 
the Graduate Council. The Graduate Council consists of: the Deans 
of Graduate Studies of the two Colleges; the Department (or 
Division) Heads of those departments (or divisions) of the two 
Colleges which offer graduate programs; one graduate faculty 
member for each combined department (or division) of the two 
colleges offering a graduate program, this member being elected by 
the combined graduate faculty of the departments (divisions) 
concerned; and two graduate students selected by the Graduate 
Deans. The Deans of the Colleges and the Presidents of the two 
colleges hold ex officio memberships on the Council. 

Programs are developed by the joint departmental faculties and 
approved by the Graduate Council for recommendation to the 
Presidents. The curriculum, the appointment of graduate faculty, the 
various academic policies (including policies on admissions, course 
credits, degree requirements, etc.) are acted on by the Graduate 
Council for recommendation to the Presidents. The combined 
resources of the academic departments and libraries and the campus 
facilities of the two Colleges are utilized in support of the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program. 

Administrative operations of the program are the responsibility of 
the two Graduate Deans and of the Department or Division Heads on 
the two campuses. Each of the Graduate Deans serve a two-year 
term, on an alternating basis, as the Coordinating Dean for Graduate 
Studies. The Heads of Departments or Divisions alternate on a yearly 
basis as Departmental Coordinators. The various administrative 
officers of the two Colleges give further support to the program. 



16 



FEES, REFUNDS, & 
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



ALL FEES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE END OF ANY 
QUARTER. 

APPLICATION FEE 

An application fee of $10.00 is paid by each graduate student at 
the time of initial application for admission. This fee is not required 
of graduates from either Armstrong State College or Savannah State 
College. The acceptance of the application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student into the graduate program. This fee, which 
is paid at Armstrong State College, is not refundable. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

The matriculation fee for part-time students is $12.00 per quarter 
hour; thus, the matriculation fee for one five (5) hour course is 
$60.00. Students carrying 12 credit hours or more will pay $145.00. 

. OUT-OF-STATE TUITION 

Non-residents of Georgia carrying 12 credit hours or more must 
pay a fee of $238.00 per quarter in addition to all regular fees. 
Students carrying less than 12 credit hours in a quarter who are not 
legal residents of the State of Georgia will pay at the rate of $20.00 
per quarter hour for out-of-state tuition, in addition to matriculation 
fees. For residency requirements as established by the Board of 
Regents, see the Bulletin and General Catalogue of either Savannah 
State College or Armstrong State College. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE 

All students enrolled for six quarter hours or more must pay an 
Activity Fee of $15.00 per quarter. 

ATHLETIC FEE 
All students must pay an Athletic Fee of $8.00 per quarter. 



17 



LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students 
registering on the date listed in the catalogue as the date on which 
classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations 
completed on the date listed in the catalogue as the "last day to 
register for credit." 



CHANGE OF SCHEDULE FEE 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for a change of schedule after the 
registration cards have been processed. No charge is made if the 
change is initiated by the College. 

GRADUATION FEE 

Each candidate for graduation must pay a graduation fee of 
$25.00 prior to his or her graduation. This fee must be paid at 
Savannah State College. For further information, inquire at the 
Graduate Offices. 



REFUNDS 

Refunds of the matriculation fee and of non-resident tuition will 
be made only upon written application for withdrawal from school. 
No refunds are made for simply dropping a course. Refunds must be 
processed by the College at which fees were paid. Privilege fees are 
not refundable. Both Colleges follow the refund policy of the Board 
of Regents as stated below: 

Students who formally withdraw on the date of scheduled 
registration or during one week following the scheduled 
registration date are entitled to a refund of 80% of the fees paid 
for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw during the 
period between one and two weeks after the scheduled registration 
date are entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a 
period of four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration 
date will be entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for 
that quarter. 



18 



DORMITORY FEES AT SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Students who occupy dormitory facilities at Savannah State 
College should refer to the Savannah State general Bulletin for 
information on fees and should contact the Office of Student Affairs 
at Savannah State for assistance. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to 
qualified students; these assistantships are awarded and administered 
by the individual graduate departments of the two Colleges. Students 
may seek information from the individual departments about 
assistantships but are advised to make a formal request for an 
assistantship only after their admission to the Graduate Program with 
Regular Admission status. 

Students are invited to contact the Offices of Financial Aids at the 
two Colleges for information on federal and state programs of 
financial assistance to college students. 

VETERANS BENEFITS 

Both campuses provide graduate students with veteran's services 
through Offices of Veterans Affairs. Information of interest to 
veterans can be obtained by writing or calling the Office of Veteran 
Affairs at either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. 

Once accepted into the graduate program, the veteran should 
contact one of the offices for processing instructions. Since 
processing time varies, a first quarter student should expect a four to 
six week delay in receiving the first benefit check. First quarter 
student veterans should consider this delay when making financial 
arrangements to attend school. 

For purposes of G.I. Bill benefits, ten (10) quarter hours is 
considered to be a full load; a load of five (5) graduate quarter hours 
entitles the graduate student to half-time benefits. 



19 



ADMISSONTO GRADUATE STUDIES 

Graduate course work provides an opportunity for continuing 
professional growth and competency, for expanding professional and 
cultural backgrounds, and for extending knowledge and 
understanding in an area of specialty. Qualified students may take 
advantage of these educational opportunities without necessarily 
seeking a degree. Admission to one of the degree programs of the 
Joint Graduate Studies Program is a serious academic venture; 
therefore, prospective students are expected to show evidence of 
high academic achievement and potential. Students who enroll as 
degree-seeking students must meet more rigorous admission stan- 
dards than those students who do not seek a master's degree. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants desiring admission on a degree-seeking status must 
present satisfactory undergraduate academic records and satisfactory 
scores on appropriate admissions examinations. Some of the graduate 
degree programs have specialized test requirements and 
undergraduate course requirements for degree-seeking students. 
Refer to the departmental programs for specific information on these 
requirements. 

General requirements for degree seeking students include the 
following: business administration applicants must provide 
satisfactory scores on the Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT); applicants in all M.Ed, programs must provide satisfactory 
scores on either the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) or the Common Examination of the National 
Teacher Examination (NTE). Satisfactory undergraduate grades must 
be presented by degree seeking students. 

Applicants for admission to M.Ed, programs must present satis- 
factory scores on either the appropriate area examination of the NTE 
or the appropriate advanced test of the GRE. For details of this 
requirement, consult the appropriate departmental entry in the 
catalogue. These applicants must also present a recommendation 
from the school in which they have interned or have been employed 
before they may be given degree seeking status. (See following 
section on Admission Procedures, item 3.) 

Applications for the above examinations are usually available at 
the two Colleges and will be given to students who come to the 
Colleges to obtain them. Students who wish to write for an 
application form or to submit an application for these examinations 
should contact: Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 

20 






08540. Students should request that their test scores be sent to the 
Graduate Studies Office, Armstrong State College, Savannah, Georgia 
31406. 



TYPES OF ADMISSION 



Regular Admission (a degree-seeking classification) 

Regular Admission means that a student is admitted to the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program with full graduate status. 

A student who has earned a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college, who has completed all of the prerequisites for his 
proposed major area, and who meets the other requirements of the 
Graduate Program may be admitted on Regular Admission status. 
These requirements include minimum undergraduate grade-point 
averages in combination with certain minimum test scores. These 
grade-point averages range from a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 to a 
minimum of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and must be combined with 
minimum test scores on the GMAT or the GRE or the NTE 
depending on the degree program (see above). The combinations of 
G.P.A. and test score constitute a numerical standard of admission 
and include intermediate points on a scale with an inverse relation 
between GPA and test scores. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the 
appropriate departmental entry. 



Conditional Admission (a degree-seeking classification) 

Conditional Admission means that a student is admitted to the 
Joint Graduate Studies Program pending his meeting certain 
conditions before achieving full graduate status (i.e., Regular 
Admission). 

For Conditional Admission, a student must hold a baccalaureate 
degree and meet the other admission requirements of the Graduate 
Program. These requirements include minimum undergraduate 
grade-point averages in combination with certain minimum test 
scores. These grade-point averages range from a minimum G.P.A. of 
2.2 to a minimum of 2.7 (on a 4.0 scale) and must be combined with 
minimum test scores on the GMAT or the GRE or the NTE 
depending on the degree program (see above). The combinations of 
GPA and test score constitute a numerical standard of admission and 
include intermediate points on a scale with an inverse relation 
between GPA and test scores. 



21 



For area test scores required by any department, see 
appropriate departmental entry. 



A student admitted under the Conditional category must consul 
with the appropriate departmental coordinator for an appraisal of his 
academic readiness for graduate work in the program within that 
department. The student may be required to remove any specific 
deficiencies that are ascertained by taking undergraduate supporting 
courses before he is allowed to attempt graduate courses within that 
program. 

Any conditionally admitted student who has completed fifteen 
(15) quarter hours of approved, consecutive graduate course work — 
ten (10) hours of which must be in the academic major — with no 
grade less than B may apply for and subsequently will receive 
Regular Admission status. Upon the completion of twenty-five (25) 
quarter hours of approved course work — fifteen (15) hours of which 
must be in the academic major — with a B average or better, the 
student achieves Regular Admission status. 

If, upon completing twenty-five (25) quarter hours of course 
work, the student does not have a B average or better (i.e., 3.0 on a 
4.0 system), he or she will be dropped as a degree-seeking student. 



Special Admission 

The special admission classification is designed for those students 
who may not wish to pursue a graduate degree, including teachers 
whose main purpose is to obtain credits necessary for teacher 
certification. Such students may be admitted to graduate courses 
under conditions specified by the Graduate Office. These conditions 
ordinarily include documentary evidence of a baccalaureate degree 
and may include consultation with the department in which the 
student intends to study. 

If the student should later decide to apply for admission as a 
degree-seeking student, he must submit a written request to the 
Graduate Office and must meet all of the requirements set forth for 
degree-seeking status. No more than ten (10) hours earned while 
enrolled as a Special Admissions Student may be applied toward a 
degree. 

Transient Student 

Transient students must have written permission from their 
advisers or other personnel at the graduate school in which they are 



22 






enrolled in order to enroll in the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 
They must also submit the application-for-admission form and the 
$10 fee as described below. 

READMISSIONS 

Any student in the Joint Graduate Studies Program who did not 
matriculate (i.e., register) during the quarter immediately preceding 
the quarter in which he next intends to matriculate must process a 
readmission form with the Registrar's Office. The only students 
exempted from this requirement are those students who are admitted 
to the Program in the quarter immediately preceding the quarter of 
intended matriculation. For further information, inquire at the 
Graduate Offices or Registrar's Office. (Note: through Summer 
Quarter of 1978, the Registrar at Savannah State College will handle 
matriculations and readmissions for the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program.) 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

The Graduate Office at Armstrong State College is the graduate 
admissions office. All admissions documents should be sent to this 
office for processing. 

The following materials and procedures are part of the 
requirements for admission to the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

1. The application-for-admission form, available in the Graduate 
Office at either College, must be completed and submitted. 
Required of all applicants. 

2. Three (3) official transcripts showing all college credits earned 
for the undergraduate degree should be sent directly from the 
college which awarded the degree to the Graduate Office at 
Armstrong State College. Required of all applicants except 
transient students who may submit letter of authorization from 
their graduate school. 

3. Test scores and completed recommendation forms (these forms 
available in the two Graduate Offices) must be submitted. 
Required of degree-seening students only; Special Admissions 
students may be exempted. 

4. A ten dollar ($10) application fee is required of all students, 
except graduates of Savannah State College and Armstrong 
State College. 



23 ' 



All materials and documents should be submitted as soon as 
possible but at least twenty (20) days prior to the registration date of 
the quarter a student enrolls. Action can be taken on applications for 
admission only after all of the required materials have been received. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY DOES NOT IMPLY 
AUTOMATIC ACCEPTANCE OF THE STUDENT AS A 
CANDIDATE FOR ANY MASTER'S DEGREE. SEE SECTION ON 
CANDIDACY FOR DEGREE. 





24 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The student is charged with the responsibility for taking the 
initiative in meeting all academic requirements and in maintaining a 
careful check on his or her progress toward earning a degree. The 
student is responsible for discharging his or her obligations to the 
business offices and the libraries and for adhering to the rules and 
regulations appertaining to graduate students in particular and to all 
students enrolled in a unit of the University System of Georgia. 
Graduate student academic regulations are set forth in this bulletin; 
for information regarding general regulations of students using the 
property and facilities of Savannah State College or Armstrong State 
College, refer to the general bulletins and student publications of the 
two Colleges. It is the student's responsibility to abide by catalogue 
requirements. A student's claim that he or she has been granted an 
exception to these requirements must be documented before the 
merits of the claim can be evaluated. 



ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, the student will be 
referred to a Departmental or Program Coordinator for adviser 
assignment. Consultation with the assigned adviser is required prior 
to registration. Each student must process appropriate advisement 
papers which are available from his or her assigned adviser and which 
provide the adviser clearance required for registration. 

Transient students report to the Graduate Office for advisement 
and adviser clearance. 

Special Admissions students obtain adviser clearance by processing 
the Special Admissions advisement form with their assigned advisers. 
During the quarter in which a Special Admissions student achieves 
degree-seeking status, he or she must process the Program of Study 
form. 

Degree-seeking students, both Regular and Conditional Admissions 
students, must process the Program of Study form with their 
assigned advisers no later than the end of their first quarter of 
enrollment. A temporary adviser clearance statement may be 
provided by the adviser which will be valid only for the student's 
initial registration. This temporary clearance should be processed on 
a special advisement form, with appropriate notations made to 
indicate that it is temporary. 

25 



1 



The Program of Study shows the courses the student will take in 
his or her degree program, transfer courses that might apply to the 
degree, and prerequisite courses or other prerequisites. The Program 
of Study must be followed by the student as he works toward a 
degree. However, the student can take courses additional to those on 
his Program of Study, and he may enroll in the courses on his 
Program of Study during quarters other than those which might be 
shown on his Program of Study form. Moreover, the student may 
officially modify his Program of Study with the concurrence of his 
adviser and other appropriate personnel by processing the form for 
Modification of Program of Study. These forms are available from 
the advisers. 

Students should note that any departure from the catalogue 
requirements for a degree must be approved by the Graduate Dean. 

REGISTRATION 

Before a student may register for graduate courses in the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program he must be formally admitted as a 
graduate student, or if his circumstances require, be readmitted (see 
section on Admissions, paragraph on Readmissions). Through the 
Summer Quarter of 1978, registration will occur on the Savannah 
State campus. 

TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDITS 

A maximum of thirty (30) hours of credit may be transferred 
from another institution, provided: 

1. that each course equates with a course in the curriculum of the 
Joint Graduate Program or is an acceptable elective. 

2. that the credit was earned in an accredited graduate program. 

3. that a grade of B or better was earned in each course. 

4. that the credit was earned within the past five years. 

5. that no more than fifty percent of the required credits shall be 
transferred for use towards a master's degree (i.e., no more than 
50% of either the required professional education credits or 
other required credits). 

For additional information on the amount of credit transferable 
for a particular degree program, refer to the appropriate 
departmental entry. 

26 



PROCEDURES FOR PROCESSING TRANSFER CREDITS 

Requests by students to receive transfer graduate credit must be 
supported by three (3) copies of the graduate transcript showing the 
credits requested. The formal and final request for receiving transfer 
credit is part of the Application for Candidacy which the student 
must process upon the completion of 25 hours of graduate work. 
This application is obtained in the Graduate Offices. 

Advisement on transfer of credit is routinely provided on the 
Program of Study form which every degree-seeking student must 
complete with his adviser in his first quarter of enrollment. Final 
approval of transfer credits is established by the Graduate Dean's 
approval of the student's Application for Candidacy. 

Prospective students may write to the Department Coordinator in 
their area of study to obtain advisement on transfer of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Courses numbered 500 to 599 are open to both undergraduate and 
graduate students. In such courses, the quantity and quality of work 
required of the graduate students will be on the same level as that 
required in those courses offered exclusively for graduates. Courses 
numbered 600 to 699 will be open only to graduate students. 
Candidates for master's degrees must take at least fifty percent of 
their courses at the 600 level. 



GRADUATE CLASS REGULATIONS AND SCHEDULES 

Graduate classes are conducted in conformity with the general 
academic policies of the Board of Regents and of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program and the regulations of the Campus on which a given 
class is taught. Specific class requirements, including attendance 
requirements and requirements for grades are set by the instructor 
for each class. 

The two sponsoring Colleges reserve the right to cancel classes and 
to adjust class schedules. 



GRADES 

In accordance with the policies of the Board of Regents, the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program is on a 4.0 grade point system. The only 
grades approved by the Board of Regents for computing the grade 
point averages of students are: A— 4, B— 3, C— 2, D— 1, F— 0, and WF 
(withdrew failing) —0. The Board of Regents has also approved for 



21 



uses other than for computing grade point averages, the following 
symbols: I— incomplete; W— withdrew without penality; V— audit; 
K— credit for a course by examination; and S— satisfactory and 
U— unsatisfactory which are applicable only to theses, practicums, 
internships, and proficiency requirements. 

In the Joint Graduate Studies Program grades assigned are A, B, C, 
D, F (failure), I (incomplete), W (withdrew with no penalty), and WF 
(withdrew failing). The grade of W does not enter into computing a 
student's grade point average. 

Stipulations applicable to other symbols used in the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program include : 

I— incomplete. May be awarded by an instructor, who will also 
stipulate the conditions for its removal. Any grade of I which has not 
been removed by completing the course after three (3) quarters of 
matriculating in residence after the I was awarded shall become an 
automatic F; if the I has not been removed within one calendar year 
after the I was awarded, regardless of intervening matriculations, the 
I shall become an F. 

W— withdrawal without penalty. May be awarded by an instructor up 
to the mid-quarter period in a course. Regents' policy stipulates that 
"Withdrawals without penalty will not be permitted after the 
mid-point of the total grading period (including final examinations) 
except in cases of hardship as determined by the appropriate official 
of the respective institution." 

WF— withdrew failing. May be awarded by an instructor anytime that 
a student withdraws from a course after the drop/add period; 
mandatory after midquarter except for hardship cases as stipulated 
above for grades of W. 

V— audit. Use of this symbol is subject to the discretion of the 
individual joint graduate departments, and the departments may 
require that a student receive the permission of the instructor to 
audit a course prior to registering for the course. Moreover, an 
auditing student must pay the usual fees, must register for the 
course, and may not transfer from audit to credit status (or vice 
versa). 

S and U— satisfactory and unsatisfactory; see above. Specific courses 
receiving these grades are identified in departmental course listings. 
Comprehensive examinations given these grades also. 



28 



K— credit by examination. Use of this symbol is subject to the 
discretion of the individual joint graduate departments. 

NOTICE: Students expecting to receive grades of V or K must 
insure that they are enrolled in an appropriate course or activity for 
which V or K grades are awarded by the appropriate department. If 
this catalogue does not show in the departmental entries that the 
given departments have authorized the use of V or K, then a student 
expecting to receive V in a course should obtain written verification 
from the appropriate instructor prior to registering for the course 
that V will be awarded. 



ACADEMIC PROBATION AND STANDING 

Any student who falls below a 3.0 (B) average shall be on 
academic probation. 

Any student who is admitted to Conditional Admission status and 
who does not achieve a 3.0 average or better upon completing 25 
hours shall be dropped as a degree-seeking student and be placed on 
Special status. Any Regular Admission student who has less than a 
3.0 average after completing 25 or more hours shall be placed on 
"regular admission— probation status" and shall, thereafter, be 
required to achieve grades of B or better in all courses in order to 
maintain this status and must achieve a 3.0 average in order to return 
to Regular Admission status. Any student on "regular admission- 
probation status" who earns less than a B in any course or who 
accumulates 75 hours while still on this status shall be dropped as a 
degree-seeking student and shall be placed on Special status. 

COURSE LOAD LIMITATION 

A full-time graduate student is expected to carry no more than 
fifteen (15) hours per quarter. The course load for employed 
students should be appropriately reduced in consultation with their 
advisers. Students on academic probation or on Conditional 
Admissions status should carefully plan their course loads in 
consultation with their advisers. 



WITHDRAWAL, DROPPING COURSES, AND 
ADDING COURSES 

Withdrawal is, in the technical sense, dropping all courses and 
processing a formal withdrawal through the Office of Graduate 
Studies which issues a withdrawal form. A student may withdraw 
from school (or drop a single course) at any time during the quarter. 



29 



Only by formally withdrawing, however, can a student become 
eligible for the refund of fees as explained in the section on fees. The 
student bears the responsibility of contacting the graduate office to 
effect a withdrawal and of contacting his professor(s) to determine 
what grade(s) he will receive (W or WF). In order to expedite any 
refund due, the student must initiate his withdrawal on the same 
campus where he paid fees. 

Dropping a course should also be formalized through the Graduate 
Office which will process a drop /add slip. If a student is taking only 
one course, the drop becomes, technically, a withdrawal, and a 
refund may be due. The student is responsible for contacting his 
instructor concerning the grade he will receive (W, WF). 

Adding a course is also formalized through the Graduate Office 
which will process a drop/add slip. Courses may be added only 
during the late registration days at the beginning of the quarter and 
not at any other time during the quarter. The student must pay the 
appropriate fee for the additional course, unless a course comparable 
in credit hours is being dropped simultaneously. 

The Graduate Council reserves the right to request the withdrawal 
of any student at any time during his course of studies if he does not 
meet the required standards of scholarship, or if he cannot remain in 
the program without endangering his own health or the health of 
others, or if he fails in any way to meet the standards of the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program. 

CATES COURSES 

Savannah State College and Armstrong State College participate in 
the Coastal Area Teacher Education Service, a consortium of area 
public school systems and institutions of the University System of 
Georgia offering graduate and undergraduate courses in teacher 
education. The Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at Savannah 
State College approves the acceptance of CATES courses for credit 
toward a degree program in the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

A student who wishes to apply CATES course credit to his degree 
program must obtain approval from his adviser to take a course for 
degree credit prior to taking the course. Without this prior approval, 
the course is subject to being treated as a transfer course, in which 
case, the Transfer of Graduate Credits policies and procedures 
described in this Bulletin will be followed. 



30 



EGREESAND GENERAL 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

DEGREES OFFERED 

The following degrees are offered in the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program : 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Education in Business Education 

Master of Education in Biology 

Master of Education in Chemistry 

Master of Education in Elementary Education 

Master of Education in Early Childhood Education 

Master of education in Special Education— Behavior Disorders 

Master of Education in English 

Master of Education in Mathematics 

Master of Education in History 

Master of Education in Political Science 

The sponsoring colleges have approved the addition to the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program of Master of Education degree programs in 
Industrial Arts Education and Science Education, and of Master of 
Science degree programs in Chemistry and Criminal Justice. Approval 
for the offering of these degree programs is pending action by the 
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Any student 
who might be interested in one of these programs should request 
further information on the status of the program from the Office of 
the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at either Savannah State 
College or Armstrong State College. 

TIME LIMITATION 

Students working toward a master's degree must complete all 
requirements for the degree within a period of not more than six 
years from the date of admission to the degree program. Extension 
of time may be granted by the Graduate Council, upon 
recommendation of the student's major department, but only in 
cases of unusual circumstances. 



31 



COURSE AND RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of sixty (60) quarter hours of graduate credits must 
be earned for the Master of Education degree. Credit for a minimum 
of thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in residence. Courses to 
be counted for residence may be accumulated on a full-time or 
part-time basis. 

Satisfactory completion of sixty (60) quarter hours of approved 
graduate credits is required for the Master of Business Administration 
degree; thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in residence. 



BALANCE OF COURSES 

Two forms of balance in accumulating courses must be adhered to 
by degree-seeking students. First, at least fifty percent (50%) of the 
courses earned for a degree must be at the 600 level. 

Second, fifty percent (50%) of the courses applied to a degree 
must be earned at each of the two Colleges (Savannah State and 
Armstrong State). This balance of courses between the two Colleges 
includes a 50-50 balancing of the required courses and a 50-50 
balancing of the elective courses in each degree program. Minor 
deviations from this strict 50-50 balancing of courses may be allowed 
where an odd number of courses in either the required or the elective 
category or in both categories requires the deviation. The depart- 
mental degree program descriptions identify the 600 level courses 
and provide additional guidance on balancing courses. 

DEGREE CANDIDACY 

Upon successful completion of twenty-five quarter hours of 
graduate work, and at least one quarter prior to making application 
for the degree, the student is required to file an application for 
admission to candidacy. The student will submit four copies of the 
completed application to his major department. Application forms 
are available in the Graduate Offices on both campuses. 

Approval of the application will be based upon verification that 
the student: 

1. has been admitted to full graduate status (i.e., Regular 
Admission). 

2. has maintained a minimum of a "B" average in all work 
attempted. 



32 



APPLICATION FOR THE DEGREE 

At the time specified on the academic calendar, the student must 
file an application for the appropriate master's degree with his major 
department. Note that the application for the degree must be 
preceded by the application for candidacy by at least one quarter. 
Application forms are available in the Graduate Offices. 



SUMMARY OF GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

General regulations for obtaining a master's degree from the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program are summarized as follows: 

1. Admission to full graduate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

2. Admission to candidacy for the degree. 

3. Satisfactory completion of sixty (60) quarter hours of approved 
graduate level course work. 

4. Meeting T-5 certification requirement (M.Ed, program only). 

5. Maintenance of "B" average. 

6. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination. 

7. Filing an application for the degree at the time specified. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The Master of Education degree is designed to comply with the 
requirements for teacher certification at the fifth level in the various 
areas of specialization. This degree will be granted only to students 
who qualify for T-5 certification (or equivalent certification for 
other states). This requirement entails meeting T-4 certification 
requirements (Georgia). 

Students who use graduate credits to meet T-4 certification 
requirements may be required to take graduate courses beyond the 
60 hours required for the M.Ed, degree in order to meet T-5 
certification requirements. Although the M.Ed, degree programs in 
the Joint Graduate Studies Program are designed to meet the 
requirements for approved programs for T-5, the designs assume that 
the student has already met T-4 certification requirements. All 
students without T-4 certification who are entering an M.Ed. 
Program (these students are referred to as "late decision" students) 



33 



should obtain a written statement of requirements from the State 
Department of Education and should consult with the Education 
Department at either College concerning specific courses to meet 
those requirements. 

Since the M.Ed, programs in the Joint Graduate Studies Program 
require 60 hours, which is 15 more than the 45 minimum required 
for the T-5 by the State Education Department, 15 of the 60 
graduate hours may be used to fulfill T-4 certification requirements. 
However, none of the 15 hours so used can then be applied toward 
meeting the 45 hours specified for the T-5. These 45 required hours 
include 15 hours of professional education courses (specifically: 5 in 
educational research, 5 in foundations courses, and 5 in curriculum 
and methods), plus 25 hours of major field courses, plus any other 5 
hours to make the total of 45 hours. 

In order to comply with the State Department of Education 
Criteria for Advanced Study, "the late decision student's first 
encounter with professional study (must) include the essentials of 
the undergraduate criteria for professional study." These criteria 
cover four areas in professional education rather than just three. 
These four are: 1) social foundations, 2) learning and learners, 
3) teaching strategies, curriculum and media, and 4) professional 
laboratory experiences. In meeting these requirements, the late 
decision student will need to consult with the Education Depart- 
ments. 

Detailed information concerning programs and procedures relating 
to graduate teacher certification may be obtained from the Office of 
Graduate Studies or from the Department of Education at either 
College. 



34 



DEPARTMENTS: PROGRAMS 
AND COURSES 



Departmental requirements covering admissions, prerequisite 
courses, and other aspects of the programs of study are described in 
this section of the Bulletin. 

PROGRAM COORDINATORS 

For each program of study, the department head on one campus 
serves as the Coordinator. The Coordinators alternate on a yearly 
basis between Armstrong State College and Savannah State College. 
The Coordinators terminate their roles in September of each year 
and, therefore, the 1977 Coordinators begin their service in 
September, 1976. 

The Departmental Coordinators for 1976 and 1977 are: 

Business Administration: Dr. Emory H. Richards (ASC), 1976 — Dr. 

Mary Torian (SSC), 1977. 
Business Education: Dr. Mary Torian (SSC), 1976 — Dr. Emory H. 

Richards (ASC), 1977. 
Biology: Dr. Margaret Robinson (SSC), 1976 — Dr. Leslie Davenport 

(ASC), 1977. 
Chemistry: Dr. Willie Tucker (SSC), 1976 - Dr. Henry Harris (ASC), 

1977. 
Elementary Education: Dr. Thelma Harmond (SSC), 1976 - Dr. 

William Stokes (ASC), 1977. 
English: Dr. Hugh Pendexter (ASC), 1976 — Dr. Luetta Milledge 

(SSC), 1977. 
History and Political Science: Dr. Elmer Dean (SSC), 1976 — Dr. 

Roger Warlick (ASC), 1977. 
Mathematics: Mr. J. B. Clemmons (SSC), 1976 — Dr. Richard 

Summerville (ASC), 1977. 

COURSES 

Graduate courses are listed and described in each departmental 
section. The following course numbering system is used: courses 
numbered 500-599 may be taken by undergraduate or graduate 
students and, in some cases, are courses that are cross-listed as both 
400 and 500 courses. Courses numbered 600-699 or higher are for 
graduate students only. 



35 



Each course listed shows the departmental identification, the 
course number, the course name, a code number and the campus 
location. The code number indicates: with the first number, the 
hours of lecture per week; with the second number, the hours of lab 
per week; and with the third number, the quarter hours of credit for 
the course. Example: Chemistry 522. Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Statements on prerequisites, campus location and descriptions 
follow the course numbers. 






BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Emory H. Richards, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Mary 
Torian, Department Head, SSC); Dr. Anderson (SSC); Dr. Bhatia 
(ASC); Dr. Byrd (SSC); Dr. Eason (ASC); Dr. Hall (ASC); Dr. Johns 
(SSC); Dr. Laburtis (ASC); Dr. Landrum (ASC); Dr. O'Keefe (SSC); 
and Dr. Singh (SSC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Business Administration 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Mary Torian 

OBJECTIVE 

The Master of Business Administration degree program is designed 
to give candidates a broad background of advanced professional 
training in organizational management. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general admission requirements and procedures 
for all graduate programs stated earlier in this bulletin, more specific 
requirements for admission to the MBA program are given below: 

All applicants for admission to the MBA program are required to 
take the Graduate Management Admissions Test. This test is 
administered at Savannah State College and at other testing centers 
once each quarter. The test is designed to measure aptitude for 
graduate study in business and is not a measure of knowledge in 
specific subjects. Therefore, applicants should not delay taking this 
examination simply because they have not had specific course work 
in business. 



36 



REGULAR ADMISSION 

To qualify for admission to full graduate status in the MBA 
program, applicants must show competence in the common business 
core of knowledge, which requires a basic understanding of 
accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and 
statistics. Students who have received a bachelor's degree in business 
generally have fulfilled this requirement, but students with degrees in 
other disciplines will need preparatory work in these areas before 
beginning MBA course work. The preparatory requirements may be 
met by the satisfactory completion of not less than one course 
(equivalent to 5 quarter hours or 3 semester hours) in each of the 
following areas: 

Accounting (Principles, Managerial, or Cost) 

Economics (Micro and Macro Principles) 

Finance (Business, Corporate, or Managerial) 

Management (Principles) 

Marketing (Principles) 

Statistics (Elements of) 

Normally, thirty hours of preparatory work will be the maximum 
required, but students should recognize that one course in 
accounting and one course in economics will provide only a 
minimum level of preparation for graduate course work. A better 
preparation could easily improve the performance in related graduate 
courses by one letter grade or even two. 

These preparatory requirements may be satisfied by taking 
appropriate courses on campus, or by correspondence, or by scoring 
not less than the fiftieth percentile on the appropriate subject 
examination(s) of the CLEP (College Level Examination Program). 
The CLEP examinations are available through the testing services of 
either College. 

In addition to appropriate preparatory work, regular admission 
status requires that one of the following admission standards be met: 

1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 and a score of not 
less than 450 on the Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT) or 

2. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 and a score of not 
less than 400 on the GMAT, or 

3. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 and a score of 
not less than 425 on the GMAT, or other combinations of grade 



37 



point averages between 2.5 and 3.0 in conjunction with GMAT 
scores between 450 and 400 on an inverse scale. 



CONDITIONAL ADMISSION 

Conditional admission will be accorded those applicants who meet 
all the requirements for regular admission with the exception of 
preparatory course work. Upon satisfactory completion of the 
prerequisite courses, the conditional status will be removed and 
regular admission status will be accorded. 

Conditional admission may also be given to a limited number of 
applicants who fail to meet the admission standards for regular 
admission but, nevertheless, present evidence of a resonable prospect 
of success in the program. 

For this latter category of conditional admission, which will be 
limited to twenty percent of the total student body in the MBA 
program, applicants must meet one of the following requirements: 

1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.2 and a score of not 
less than 425 on the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT), or 

2. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 and a score of not 
less than 375 on the Graduate Management Admission Test, or 

3. Other combinations of grade point averages between 2.2 and 
2.7 in conjunction with GMAT scores between 425 and 375 on 
an inverse scale. 

Upon completion of twenty-five hours of graduate course work 
with a "B" average, the conditional admission status will be changed 
to regular admission, providing all other requirements for regular 
admission have been satisfied. 



ADMISSION STATUS AS A 
PREREQUISITE TO MBA COURSES 

Stipulations and problems related to the pursuit of graduate study 
in the business administration courses require that students meet 
those conditions identified above under either the Regular or the 
Conditional Admissions categories in order to enroll in any MBA 
courses. Therefore, the Special Admissions category offers little or 
no opportunity for graduate study in business administration and in 
practice is not granted to MBA students. 



38 



ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, each student will be 
assigned a faculty adviser. The faculty adviser will approve the 
scheduling of course work, recommend the student for candidacy, 
and serve as chairman of the student's comprehensive examination 
committee. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Business Administration program requires forty-five 
quarter hours of core course requirements and an additional fifteen 
quarter hours of electives from graduate course offerings. 



Quarter Hours 
I. Core requirements 45 

BAD 602 — Managerial Micro Economics (ASC) 

BAD 610 — Managerial Statistics (SSC) 

BAD 611 — Quantitative Methods in Business (ASC) 

BAD 620 — Managerial Finance (ASC) 

BAD 630 — Managerial Costing and Control (SSC) 

BAD 650 — Marketing Problems Seminar (SSC) 

BAD 660 — Advanced Management Seminar (ASC) 

BAD 662 — Human Behavior in Organization (SSC) 

BAD 665 - Administrative Policy (ASC or SSC) 

II. Electives 15 

BAD 601 BAD 612 BAD 640 BAD 661 
BAD 604 BAD 613 BAD 663 

BAD 605 BAD 621 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students are required to take one-half of their course work on each campus. 
Responsibility for the MBA courses is divided between the two sponsoring 
colleges as indicated below: 

Required Courses 
Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BAD 610 BAD 650 BAD 602 BAD 620 

BAD 630 BAD 662 BAD 611 BAD 660 

BAD 665 offered at SSC or ASC 



39 



All courses are scheduled to be offered in early and late evening periods. 
Courses are offered on one campus on Monday and Wednesday and the other 
on Tuesday and Thursday. Thus, there are four non-conflicting evening 
periods. Each required course is offered every other quarter. A full-time 
student, having all undergraduate prerequisite courses, may complete the 
MBA program in four consecutive quarters. 



ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

It will be the responsibility of the student to make application for 
admission to candidacy after the completion of all prerequisite 
courses and twenty-five hours of graduate course work. This 
application will be in four copies to the faculty adviser. Admission to 
candidacy is contingent upon verification that the student has 
attained a "B" average in twenty-five hours of course work and has 
met all regular admission requirements including: 

1. an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admissions 
Test. 

2. completion of all undergraduate prerequisite courses. 

3. removal of conditional admission status, when applicable. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A final comprehensive examination, to be scheduled in a student's 
final quarter and at least two weeks prior to graduation, is required 
of all candidates for the Degree of Master of Business 
Administration. The final examination will be conducted by a 
committee consisting of the student's faculty adviser as chairman and 
other members of the graduate faculty appointed by the MBA 
Coordinator. The date of the examination, the time and place, will 
be set by the Coordinator after consultation with the faculty adviser. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for 
Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the examination and the 
composition of the committee. 

The candidate is expected to demonstrate an adequate 
understanding of the common core of knowledge in business, 
economics, and statistics, and competency to discuss advanced 
material in those areas in which he has had graduate course work. 



40 



The examining committee's decision on the candidate's perfor- 
mance on the comprehensive examination shall be reported as "S" or 
"U" to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the 
examination. Should the decision be reported as "U," the committee 
will outline a program of corrective action to be taken by the 
candidate prior to his being re-examined. 

Graduate Courses in Business Administration 

It should be understood that prerequisite to all MBA courses, the 
student must satisfy requirements in the common body of 
knowledge of business and administration as stated above. Waivers 
may be granted for certain courses. 

BAD 601. Macro Economic Analysis. (5-0-5). SSC. 
National income accounting. Determinants of national income, 
employment, price level and growth rates. 

BAD 602. Managerial Economics. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Economic analysis applied to decision making at the level of the 
firm. Analysis of demand, pricing, and cost. National income and 
firm forecasting problems. Financial and long term planning. 

BAD 604. Business Relations with Government and Society. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

The business environment with consideration of the economic, 
legal and social implications for policy making. 

BAD 605. Special Economic Problems. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Analysis of current economic issues. 

BAD 610. Managerial Statistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Applications in economic and business statistics. 

BAD 611. Quantitative Methods in Business. (5-0-5). ASC. 
The application of models and mathematical techniques to 
modern decision-making. 

BAD 612. Seminar in Business Research. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The application of research methods in both the internal and 
external domains of business. Guided research in a substantive field 
of the student's choice, i.e., finance, marketing, accounting, 
management, forecasting, or any other area in which the objectives 
of the research project is the acquisition of information useful to 
business enterprise. 

BAD 613. Administrative Communications. (5-0-5). ASC. 
The role of communication in effective business management; 
theory and principles necessary for practical applications; study of 



41 



communication problems within, between and among organizations, 
industry and other groups. 

BAD 620. Managerial Finance. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Analysis of financial problems and policies. 

BAD 621. Investment Management. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The theory and tools of analysis required in the management of 
financial assets from the viewpoint of the investor and the 
investment adviser. Investment media, markets, problems, practices, 
and philosophies will be studied. 

BAD 630. Managerial Costing and Control. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The study of physical and monetary input-output relationships 
and use of such cost studies for managerial strategy, planning, and 
control. 

BAD 640. Information Systems. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Total Information Systems for managerial strategy, planning and 
control. 

BAD 650. Marketing Problems Seminar. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An examination of new developments in the dynamic field of 
marketing from the viewpoint of the marketing decision-maker. 

BAD 660. Advanced Management Seminar. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The historical foundations and development of management 
concepts. Emphasis is upon developing concepts in dealing with 
emerging problems of management. 

BAD 661. Theory of Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A universally applicable study of organizations and their 
structures. Organizational factors and associated concepts are 
examined and analyzed. 

BAD 662. Human Behavior in Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Contributions and limitations of the behavioral sciences in the 
development of modern organization theory. 

BAD 663. Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Modern industrial relations and its background. Current problems 
in labor relations. 

BAD 665. Administrative Policy. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. Prereq- 
uisites: BAD 610, 611 and 30 additional quarter hours of graduate 
credit; should be taken near the end of the MBA program. 

Policy-making and administration from the top management point 
of view, encompassing the entire field of organizations. 



42 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Business Education 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Emory H. Richards 



OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate program leading to the Master of 
Education Degree in Business Education are to prepare master 
teachers of business and vocational business education and to prepare 
individuals for administrative and supervisory positions in these 
specialties for the secondary and junior college levels. 

In keeping with the objectives of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program, the M.Ed, in business education is designed for furthering 
professional growth and competency, expanding professional and 
cultural backgrounds, and extending knowledge and understanding in 
business education. 

This program supplements undergraduate studies for the T-4 
Certificate to teach in Georgia and provides opportunities for 
candidates to obtain the T-5 Certificate upon completion of the 
prescribed curriculum in business education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Formal admission to the degree program should be sought 
through the Admissions Office of the Joint Graduate Program as 
described in the General Admissions section of this Bulletin. 

In accordance with general admissions policies, regular admission 
with full graduate status requires the minimum 2.5 cumulative 
undergraduate average with a score of at least 500 on the N.T.E. 
Common (or 800 on the G.R.E. Aptitude), or the minimum 3.0 
cumulative undergraduate average with a score of at least 450 on the 
N.T.E. Common (or 750 on the G.R.E. Aptitude). Intermediate 
points on a scale with an inverse relation between G.P.A. and test 
scores are acceptable. Regular admission also requires a score of not 
less than 560 on the business education area examination of the 
NTE. 

Conditional admission may be granted to those students who 
show potential for successful pursuit of graduate studies. In 
accordance with general admission policies, conditional admission 
requires the minimum 2.2 G.P.A. with a score of at least 475 on the 
N.T.E. Common (or 775 on the G.R.E. Aptitude) or the minimum 
2.7 G.P.A. with a score of at least 425 on the N.T.E. Common (or 



43 



725 on the G.R.E. Aptitude). Intermediate points on a scale as 
described above are acceptable. Specific requirements based on 
individual needs and aspirations will be stipulated by the 
Departmental Admissions Committee for meeting the requirements 
of regular admission status. Conditional admission also requires a 
score of not less than 540 on the business education area 
examination of the NTE. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in Business Education will 
be assigned an adviser. As soon as the student is notified of this 
assignment, he should arrange for a conference with his or her 
adviser. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Transfer of credits will be evaluated for full credit up to 50% of 
the required hours for graduation, but these credits must meet the 
general graduate policies on transfer of credit. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A minimum of 60 quarter hours of graduate course work with 
a B average (3.00) is required for graduation with an M.Ed, 
degree in Business Education. 

2. After admission to regular status in the graduate program, and 
upon completion of 25 quarter hours of satisfactory graduate 
work, the student should file application for candidacy in 
quadruplicate to the major department. 

3. During the quarter preceding the final intended quarter of 
matriculation for the M.Ed, degree in Business Education (and 
by the deadline specified on the academic calendar), the 
candidate must file an application for the degree with the 
Graduate Studies Office. 

4. During the final quarter of residence, a candidate must pass a 
final comprehensive examination in the field. The Business 
Education Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans 
for Graduate Studies ten (10) days prior to the examination 
concerning the proposed place, date, and time of the examina- 
tion and the composition of the committee. The examining 
committee's decision on the candidate's performance on the 



44 



comprehensive examination will be reported as "pass" or "fail" 
to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three (3) days after 
the examination. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
The basic plan of the curriculum is summarized as follows: 

Quarter Hours 

Professional Education Courses 15 

Business Education Content Courses 30 

(Includes BED 601 (5 hours), BED 611 (5 hours) and 10 hours of 
Business Administration cognate courses.) 

Electives 15 

Total 60 

The curriculum is designed with several options to meet the needs 
of varying specialists in the field of business teacher education. The 
course content of these options comes from appropriate selection of 
courses in the 30-hour business education content area, including the 
10 hours of cognate courses. These options and specific courses 
required under each are : 

Option 1. Administration and Supervision: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 603, 611 and 612 
Option 2. Stenographic-Clerical: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 621, and 622. 
Option 3. General Business and Accounting: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 631, and 632. 
Option 4. Data Processing: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 623, and 624. 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Education Course Requirements 15 

Foundations 5 

EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

or 
EDN 621— Advanced Studies in Human Growth and 
Development (SSC) 

or 
EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning 
(SSC) 

Quarter Hours 

Curriculum and Methods 5 

EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

Research 5 

EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 



45 



II. Content Course Requirements 30 

Content courses, including cognate courses, and electives will be selected by 
the student based on his interests, aptitudes, and professional goals. A thesis 
option is available through registration in BED 690. BED 601 and BED 611 
are required. 

BED 601 BED 611 BED 622 BED 632 
BED 602 BED 612 BED 623 BED 690 
BED 603 BED 621 BED 631 BED 700 

All of the above courses carry 5 hours credit except 690 and 700 which 
carry 10 hours of credit each. 

Special Summer Workshop Courses Available 

BED 620—10 hours; combines BED 621 and 622. 
BED 630—10 hours; combines BED 631 and 632. 
BED 640—10 hours; combines BED 623 and 624. 

Workshops are offered alternately on each campus. 

Business Administration Cognate Courses 

As a part of the content area, a minimum of 10 hours of Business 
Administration courses is required. These courses, selected in conference 
with the student's adviser, should complement the selected option of 
concentration. 

III. Elective Course Requirements 15 

The 15 hours of electives may be selected from Business Administration 
courses and should complement the selected option of concentration. An 
appropriate course in exceptional children (EXC 522) must be taken if not 
taken previously. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of 
their required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. 
For the campus location of the Education courses, see the Education 
Department section of this Bulletin. For the campus location of the 
Business Administration courses, see the Master of Business Administration 
degree program in this section of this Bulletin. A guide to the campus 
location of the Business Education courses is given below. 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BED 611 BED 624 BED 601 BED 621 

BED 612 BED 632 BED 602 BED 623 

BED 622 BED 700 BED 603 BED 631 

BED 690 offered at both Colleges. 

BED 620, 630, and 640 — For more information, contact the Coordinator. 



46 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The student who does not hold the Georgia T-4 teaching 
certificate or its equivalent must satisfy the regulations of the State 
Department of Education through additional courses as may be 
required. 

The professional education requirements may be met, depending 
on the evaluation of the undergraduate transcript, through the 
fifteen hours of electives and additional hours as may be required. 
See section on Teacher Certification under General Degree 
Requirements. 

Graduate Courses in Business Education 

BED 601. Principles, Problems, and Curriculum Development in 
Business Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive view of the basic principles and criteria for 
developing effective programs in business education on all levels, 
with special attention to problems of identification, growth, and 
contributions. 

BED 602. Current Problems and Issues in Vocational Business 
Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the principles of vocational education; federal and state 
legislation as it pertains to programs of vocational education; the 
organization and operation of vobe programs; and related research. 

BED 603. Evaluation of Research and Empirical Literature in 
Business Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Critical analysis of research studies in business education; study 
and development of reports, research studies, investigations, and 
methods of recording and retaining data, with special emphasis on 
administrative data. 

BED 611. Administration and Supervision in Business Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Principles, policies, and procedures in developing appreciation and 
understanding of and knowledge and skill in the art of effective 
administration and supervision in business education. 

BED 612. Guidance and Career Development in Business Educa- 
tion. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The role of the business education teacher and administrator in 
developing an effective career development program: inclusive of 
selection, recruitment, and grade or curriculum placement; keeping 
personnel records; a testing and evaluation program; counseling; 
placement; and followup. 



47 



BED 621. Vocational Development in Shorthand and Typewriting. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Problems in development of occupational proficiency in shorthand 
and typewriting; new media and evaluation of aptitudes, interests, 
and achievement for vocational competency. 

BED 622. Vocational Development in Office Practice and Office 
Machines. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Enrichment of selected modules for developing vocational compe- 
tency in the capstone course in Office Practice and in Office 
Machines. 

BED 623. Introduction to the Teaching of Data Processing. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Introduction to data processing; development of key punching and 
basic programming skills. 

BED 624. Vocational Development in the Teaching of Data 
Processing. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Mathematics 306 or equivalent 
computer programming skill. 

Systems, program languages, computer and keypunch operation, 
other input devices for developing modules and techniques of 
teaching modern methods of data processing. 

BED 631. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching General 
Business. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive concentration on objectives, instructional materials, 
media, teaching techniques, and evaluation procedures for general 
business and social business subjects. 

BED 632. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching Book- 
keeping and Accounting. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The development of enrichment materials and techniques for 
effective teaching and learning in bookkeeping and accounting. 

BED 690. Research and Thesis. (10 quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 
(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

An in-depth study and concentration in the development of the 
thesis research problem. Seminar sessions for progress reporting and 
critical analysis. 

BED 700. Internship in Teaching and /or Administrative Office 
Practice. (10 quarter hours). SSC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Internship teaching in vocational or secondary schools for those 
with needs in this area; full time work experience in structured 
offices for experienced teachers. 



48 



BED 620. Workshop for Vocational Development in Stenographic 
Skills. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques 
and skills incorporated in BED 621 and BED 622 as described above. 

BED 630. Workshop for Vocational Development in General 
Business and Accounting. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques 
and skills incorporated in BED 631-632 as described above. 

BED 640. Workshop for Vocational Development in Data Process- 
ing. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of program- 
ming skills and the teaching of data processing. Combines BED 623 
and 624. 

BIOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Leslie Davenport, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Margaret 
Robinson, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Beumer, ASC); Dr. Guillou, 
(ASC); Dr. Hunter, (SSC); Dr. Krishnamurti, (SSC); Dr. Nambiar, 
(SSC); Dr. Pingel, (ASC); Dr. Singh, (SSC); Dr. Thome, (ASC); and 
Dr. Woodhouse, (SSC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Biology 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Leslie Davenport 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to graduate courses in biology requires that a student 
meet the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program and be formally admitted as a graduate student. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Biology Faculty and a professional adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each of his 
advisers and plan his program under their guidance, and should have 
at least one conference per quarter with his academic adviser. 



49 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 15 

EDN 671— Educational Research — 5 hours 
Two courses (10 hours) from the following two areas: 
Foundations — 5 hours 
Curriculum and Methods — 5 hours 

II. Academic Courses — Biology 25 

In order to receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in Biology, the 
student will be expected to have acquired at least the following credits in 
either his upper division undergraduate work or in graduate work: 

15 quarter hours in botany 
15 quarter hours in zoology 
5 quarter hours in cell biology 

If the entering student has had no courses in any of these areas, his graduate 
program in biology must include courses to assure this diversification. Each 
student must include 5 quarter hours credit for the course, BIO 630, 
Biological Sciences in the Secondary School, which may be credited as 
either Biology or Education. 

The student entering the program with previous credits in biology will be 
required to take courses as needed in any of the indicated areas (botany, 
zoology, cell biology) to assure the prescribed minimum diversification. In 
addition to meeting the minimum requirement for diversification, he will 
elect courses with the advice of his graduate advisers to meet the total 
requirements of 25 hours of biology plus elective to comply with item three 
(III) below. 

III. Electives — Biology and Education 25 

No more than 20 quarter hours of graduate credit may be taken in either 
field (Biology or Education), but this should not be interpreted to restrict 
any course work which exceeds the minimum requirements for the degree. 
An appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) must be 
taken if not taken previously. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one half of 
their required courses and one half of their elective courses at each of the 
two Colleges. A guide to the location of the biology courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 



BIO 500 
BIO 501 
BIO 502 
BIO 506 
BIO 515 
BIO 520 



BIO 525 
BIO 526 
BIO 527 
BIO 601 
BIO 609 
BIO 612 



BIO 630 
BOT 607 
BOT615 
BOT 625 
BOT 626 



BIO 550 
BIO 580 
BIO 605 
BIO 635 
BIO 640 



BIO 540 
BIO 510 
BOT 525 
BOT 620 
ZOO 605 



ZOO 510 
ZOO 525 
ZOO 529 
ZOO 535 
ZOO 645 
ZOO 646 



BIO 630 offered at either college 

For location of Education Courses, see the Education Department section 
of this Bulletin. 



50 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in biology, 
each student is required to pass a comprehensive examination 
covering the areas in which he has had course work applicable to his 
degree. The examination may be oral or written. Oral examinations 
will last no more than one and one-half hours; written examinations 
will last no more than three hours. This examination will be 
completed no later than mid-term of the quarter preceding that in 
which graduation is anticipated. If the student should fail the 
examination, he may be re-examined orally or in writing, at the 
discretion of the departments, in areas of specific weakness only. The 
Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed 
place, date, and time of the examination and the composition of the 
committee. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 



Graduate Courses in Biology 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Savannah State College: 

BIOLOGY 500. Physiological Ecology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Ecology and Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological 
adaptations of plants and animals to specific environments. Emphasis 
will be placed on the physiological problems faced by organisms 
common to the local salt marsh and marine environments. 

BIOLOGY 501. General Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Twenty hours of Biological Sciences, Organic Chemistry, and General 
Physics. 

A study of the physics and chemistry of mechanisms underlying 
functional occurrences in living organisms, particularly those 
involved in homeostasis. 

BIOLOGY 502. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequi- 
site: General Physiology. 

A systematic study of the functions of the organs in the animal 
kingdom and the physiological principles involved. 

BIOLOGY 506. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
General and Field Botany and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to cellular and organismal functions important in 
the life of green plants with emphasis on the physical and chemical 
basis of the observed properties and processes. 



51 



BIOLOGY 515. Marine Biology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
General Botany and Invertebrate Zoology. 

An introduction to the physiological and ecological biology of 
microorganisms, plants, and animals of the sea and its shores. 

BIOLOGY 520. Molecular Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Genetics and Organic Chemistry. 

The nature and function of genetic material, genetic code and 
physical basis of inheritance. The study also includes genetic control 
of cellular metabolism; mechanism of gene action; genetic capacity 
for biosynthesis; gene enzyme relationship; and chemical nature of 
agents of heredity. 

BIOLOGY 525. Bacterial Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Microbiology and General Physiology. 

A review of current knowledge of bacterial growth and reproduc- 
tion considered at the molecular level. Study of cellular structure 
growth-kinetics, the synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein, the 
regulation of metabolism and general cellular physiology; the 
patterns of energy generation and biosynthesis and their regulation. 

BIOLOGY 526. Virology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Micro- 
biology. 

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of 
the viruses with emphasis on the techniques of isolation and 
cultivation. 

BIOLOGY 527. Mycology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Micro- 
biology. 

A study of the ecology, physiology, and systematics of microfungi 
with emphasis on those forms of industrial or general economic 
importance. 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Armstrong State College: 

BOTANY 510. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Botany 203 and Organic Chemistry. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect these processes. 

BOTANY 525. Plant Morphology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Botany 203. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, 
structure, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 

BIOLOGY 540. Cytology. (2-6-5). ASC. Prerequisite: Two senior 
division courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differen- 
tiation, and reproduction. 

52 



BIOLOGY 550. Evolution. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: major in 
biology (at least 15 quarter hours credit in upper division courses). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 580. General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Two 
upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology). 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations and 
communities in the field. 

ZOOLOGY 510. General Vertebrate Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the 
vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 525. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. (2-6-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and depart- 
ment head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine 
invertebrates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern 
coastal region. 

ZOOLOGY 529. Endocrinology. (4-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Zoology 410 and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism 
and reproductive cycles. 

ZOOLOGY 535. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequi- 
sites: Zoology 204, and Organic Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ 
systems involved in the maintenance of homestasis under varying 
conditions within normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues 
and systems under laboratory conditions. 

The following courses are open to graduate students only: 

BIOLOGY 601. Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology. (3-4-5). 
SSC. Prerequisites: Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and 
Principles of Genetics (5 hrs.). Recommended: Biochemistry and/or 
Microbiology. 

Concepts of biochemistry and biophysics of cells, nutrition, 
metabolism and energy transfer, molecular genetics, cellular anatomy 
and physiology, cytology, and ultrastructure. 

BIOLOGY 609. Advanced Microbiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prereq- 
uisites: Introductory Microbiology or Bacteriology (5 hrs.) and 
complete sequence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study of important pathogenic microorganisms producing 
human disease, including characteristics of microorganisms, prin- 

53 



ciples of host-parasite relationships, epidemiology, and immunity. 
Consideration will be given to microorganisms in their natural and 
unnatural environments with emphasis on techniques used in 
evaluation of their presence and effects in food, water, and soil. 

BIOLOGY 612. Advanced Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Genetics (5 hrs.) and complete sequence of Organic 
Chemistry. 

Study of gene structure and gene action from a molecular 
viewpoint. Recent concepts and experimental approaches for 
recombinational analysis, mutagenesis, and metabolism of DNA, 
RNA and protein will be discussed. 

BIOLOGY 630. The Biological Sciences in the Secondary Schools. 
(3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A course designed especially for high school biology teachers. A 
comprehensive study of national programs for high school biology 
with special emphasis on the BSCS approaches. Laboratory experi- 
ences will include utilization of actual BSCS materials and apparati. 

BIOLOGY 635. Advanced General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prereq- 
uisites: General Ecology or Plant Ecology or Animal Ecology (5 
hrs.). Recommended: Statistics. 

Studies of the processes and functional aspects of population and 
community ecology emphasizing interaction between structure and 
the environment. Consideration will be given to problems of 
environmental pollution. 

BIOLOGY 640. Cellular Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and 5 hours of Physiology. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between micro- 
scopic anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, 
metabolisms, and growth. 

BOTANY 607. Advanced Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequi- 
sites: One course in Plant Physiology (5 hrs.) and complete sequence 
in Organic Chemistry. 

Comparative study of nutritional requirements, metabolism, 
growth and development, respiration, photosynthesis, and other 
processes in selected vascular and non-vascular plants. 

BOTANY 615. Comparative Morphology of Non-Vascular Plants. 
(3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hrs.). Recom- 
mended: Plant Anatomy (5 hrs.) 

Comparative morphology of non-vascular plants emphasizing 
identification, life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 



54 



BOTANY 620. Comparative Morphology of Vascular Plants. 
(3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hrs.). Recom- 
mended: Plant Anatomy (5 hrs.). 

Comparative morphology of vascular plants emphasizing identifi- 
cation, life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 

BOTANY 625. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. 

BOTANY 626. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. 
Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hrs.) and Plant Systematics (5 
hrs.). 

A two-course sequence designed primarily for teachers, empha- 
sizing the identification of local flora (vascular and non-vascular), 
phylogeny, environmental relationships, techniques for collection 
and preservation, and the selection and use of materials for 
correlating the study of plants with other subjects. 

ZOOLOGY 605. Advanced Animal Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. 
Prerequisites: One course in General Physiology (5 hrs.) and 
complete sequence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study concerning functional activities of living organisms 
including humans in terms of both cellular and systemic functions. 
These topics include biological energetics, electrolyte distribution, 
transport through membranes, and colloidal state in biological 
systems. 

ZOOLOGY 645. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. 

ZOOLOGY 646. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. 
Prerequisites: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A two-course sequence designed primarily for teachers, empha- 
sizing the identification of local fauna (vertebrate and invertebrate), 
phylogeny, environmental relationships, techniques for collection 
and preservation, and the selection and use of materials for 
correlating the study of animals with other subjects. 



55 



CHEMISTRY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Henry Harris, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Willie Tucker, 
Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Brewer, (ASC); Dr. James, (SSC); Dr. 
Menon, (SSC); Dr. Raut, (SSC); Dr. Robbins, (ASC); and Dr. 
Stratton, (ASC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Chemistry 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Henry Harris 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in Chemistry must meet the 
general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program and must take the chemistry area examination of the 
National Teacher Examinations (NTE) in order to qualify for 
degree-seeking status. 



ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Chemistry Faculty and a professional adviser from the 
Joint Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each 
of his advisers and plan his program under their guidance and should 
have at least one conference per quarter with each adviser. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Education Courses 15 

These courses are selected in consultation with the Education Adviser. A 
Professional Education Core group of courses which is required is shown 
below: 

EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) or 

EDN 621— Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 

(SSC) or EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of Human 

Learning (SSC). 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC). 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC). 

II. Chemistry Courses 25 

These courses are selected, in consultation with the student's chemistry 
adviser, from the graduate courses in chemistry. 

56 



III. Electives 



Quarter Hours 
20 



Electives are to be chosen through advisement and according to individual 
needs and may include courses in chemistry, education, or a suitable third 
field with the prior approval of the student's advisers. An appropriate course 
in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) must be taken if not taken 
previously. 

IV. Transfer of Credits. 

Students who have earned graduate credits at an accredited institution may 
transfer a limited number of credits to be applied toward the M.Ed, degree 
in chemistry. Transfer of credit is handled on an individual basis. 

V. Balance of Courses. 



Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirements by taking one half 
of their required courses and one half of their elective courses at the two 
Colleges. A guide to the location of the courses follows: 



Savannah State College 



Armstrong State College 



CHEM 500 
CHEM 541 
CHEM 581 
CHEM 592 
CHEM 600 
CHEM 610 
CHEM 621 



CHEM 631 
CHEM 641 
CHEM 682 
CHEM 692 
CHEM 694 
CHEM 699 



CHEM 522 
CHEM 551 
CHEM 561 
CHEM 591 
CHEM 600 
CHEM 642 



CHEM 662 
CHEM 681 
CHEM 683 
CHEM 691 
CHEM 693 
CHEM 698 



A guide to the campus location of the education courses is in the Education 
Department section of this bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in chemistry, 
each student is required to pass a comprehensive examination 
covering the areas in which he has had course work. The examination 
may be oral or written. Oral examinations will last no more than one 
and one -half hours; written examinations will last no more than three 
hours. This examination will be completed no later than mid-term of 
the quarter preceding that in which graduation is anticipated. If the 
student should fail the examination, he may be reexamined orally or 
in writing, at the discretion of the departments, in areas of specific 
weakness only. The Coordinator shall notify the student and the 
Deans for Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination 
concerning the proposed place, date, and time of the examination 
and the composition of the committee. The result of the examin- 
ation will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three 
days after the examination. 



57 



Graduate Courses in Chemistry 

CHEMISTRY 500. Introduction to Chemical Research. (2-0-2). 
SSC. 

This course outlines systematic methods of literature research and 
preparation research outlines from reference to original articles. 

CHEMISTRY 522. Inorganic Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

Modern theory of structures and bonding, acid-base theories, and 
properties of some rare elements and unusual compounds will be 
detailed. The latter includes nonstoichiometric compounds, rare gas 
compounds, and coordination complexes. 

CHEMISTRY 541. Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 
Basic organic chemistry to include structures, reactions, and 
reaction mechanisms. 

CHEMISTRY 551. History of Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the 
present. Emphasis is placed on the development of ideas, men who 
made significant contributions, evolution of chemical theories and 
the modern social implications of science. 

CHEMISTRY 561. Biochemistry. (4-3-5). ASC. 
Study of buffers, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids, 
proteins, enzymes, Kreb's cycle and other metabolism routes. 

CHEMISTRY 581. Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 

The basic principles, theories, and application of fundamental 
analytical chemistry are examined. The concepts of dynamic 
equilibrium, gravimetric and volumetric analysis are stressed. 

CHEMISTRY 591. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 

This course is designed to cover the basic principles of thermo- 
dynamics and molecular structure and their applications to chemical 
systems. 

CHEMISTRY 592. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 591. 

Topics to be discussed will vary and will include subjects such as 
surface chemistry, photochemistry, irreversible processes and crystal 
structure. 

CHEMISTRY 600. Chemical Research. (0-15-5). SSC or ASC. 
Research under the supervision of a member of the Joint Graduate 
Chemistry Faculty. 

CHEMISTRY 610. Radiochemistry. (2-3-3). SSC. 

A general course dealing with nuclear structure, radioactive 
properties and decay characteristics of radioisotopes, their produc- 
tion and purification. Different types of detection of radiation, 



58 



identification of radioisotopes and their practical applications will 
also be discussed. 

CHEMISTRY 621. Chemistry for High School Teachers. (4-3-5). 
SSC. 

This course covers CHEM Study material and also Chemical 
Bonding Approach material for high school teachers. 

CHEMISTRY 631. Development of Chemical Theories. (3-0-3). 
SSC. 

A study of the basic principles upon which well known chemical 
theories are founded. Topics such as the kinetic molecular theory, 
chemical equilibria, and spectroscopy will be discussed. 

CHEMISTRY 641. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 541. 

Discussion of significant principles of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 642. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2-0-2). ASC. 

Discussion of significant principles of chemical bonding, sterio- 
chemistry and conformation analysis, spectroscopy and similar topics 
which are applicable to an understanding of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 662. Biochemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 561. 

A consideration of the chemical and physical principles employed 
in the study of macromolecules of biological importance. 

CHEMISTRY 681. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 581. 

Advanced theories and methods of analytical chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 682. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (2-0-2). SSC. 

The current problems facing analytical chemistry are used to 
coordinate and to examine contemporary thought in this field. 
Problems such as trace environmental analysis, analysis of unique 
materials and non-destructive analysis will be treated. 

CHEMISTRY 682. Instrumental Analysis. (2-3-5). ASC. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 581. 

A study of the fundamental principles, construction and opera- 
tional characteristics of modern instrumentation as related to 
physiochemical analytical techniques. Optical, electrometric and 
chromatographic separation procedures are discussed and practiced. 

CHEMISTRY 691. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 
An advanced study of molecular structure, the physical properties 
of matter, and the nature of chemical bonding. 

CHEMISTRY 692. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3-0-3). SSC. 
A primary study of classical thermodynamics and energetics with 
applications to chemical systems. 

59 



CHEMISTRY 693. Quantum Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

A review of classical mechanics and the rise of wave mechanics. 
Applications of wave mechanics to simple molecules and approx- 
imation methods will be considered. A conceptual formulation of the 
quantum theory and discussion of the one-dimensional Schroedinger 
equation. 

CHEMISTRY 694. Chemical Kinetics. (3-0-3). SSC. 

A study of rate processes and reaction mechanisms. Topics such 
theories of reaction rates, activation energies, reactions in solution 
homogenous and heterogenous catalysis, and experimental methods 
will be covered. 

CHEMISTRY 698. Seminar (2-0-2) and Chemistry 699, Seminar 
(2-0-2). ASC and SSC. 

Discussion of selected topics. 

EDUCATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Thelma Harmond, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. William 
Stokes, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. J. C. Adams, (SSC); Dr. J. V. 
Adams, (ASC); Dr. Agyekum, (SSC); Dr. Barber, (ASC); Dr. Bland, 
(ASC); Dr. Burgess, SSC); Dr. Cochan, (SSC); Dr. Eaton, (SSC); Dr. 
Gadsden, (SSC); Dr. Lane, (ASC); Dr. Lawson, (SSC); Dr. Lentini, 
(ASC); Dr. Newberry, (ASC); Dr. Robinson, (SSC); Dr. Sartor, 
(SSC); Dr. Stephens, (SSC); Dr. Sumner, (SSC); and Dr. Ward, 
(ASC). 

Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 

Master of Education in Elementary Education and in 

Early Childhood Education and in 

Special Education-Behavior Disorders 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. William Stokes 

OBJECTIVES 

By offering advanced preparation to those who professionally 
serve in schools, the Colleges hope to aid in the development of 
teachers who possess the highest qualities of character, commitment, 
and professional competence. This aim will be facilitated by 

(1) encouraging the student to do scholarly study in advanced 
professional, specialized and general education subject matter; 

(2) helping the student become acquainted with the most recent 
research developments in child growth and development and the 

60 



latest trends in curriculum; (3) deepening his appreciation for 
performance in scientific investigation and research; and (4) pro- 
moting personal and professional maturity of the student that will be 
reflected in his relationships as he goes about his work in the 
community and in the field of education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the elementary education, the early childhood, 
and the special education programs must satisfy all general admission 
requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies Program. Elementary and 
early childhood education students must submit scores on both the 
"Commons" and the area examinations of the National Teacher 
Examinations (NTE) for admission as degree-seeking students. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after admission to the program, each student will be 
assigned an adviser in the Department of Education. As soon as he is 
notified of this assignment, the student should schedule an appoint- 
ment with his adviser to determine any conditions and specific 
requirements the student must meet in order to complete both his 
degree and certification objectives. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

The Department of Education offers several specialization pro- 
grams under the aegis of the M.Ed, degree in elementary education. 
These specialized programs of study provide, in addition to the 
graduate major in elementary education which leads to T-5 certifi- 
cation in this area, opportunity for students to qualify for certain 
other kinds of certification. Students should inquire at the Depart- 
ment of Education for certification opportunities provided by these 
specialized programs. 

Graduate students majoring in elementary education must com- 
plete a minimum of sixty quarter hours of approved courses. These 
hours are divided as follows: Professional Sequence— 20 hours; 
Specialization Courses— 25 hours; and Approved Electives— 15 hours. 
One course in reading must be taken if not taken previously as well 
as an appropriate course in exceptional children if not taken 
previously. 

The specialized content courses for elementary education may be 
chosen from the following areas: art and music; foreign languages; 
health and physical education; languages arts, including reading, 

61 



literature, speech, linguistics; mathematics and science; and the social 
studies. Educational background, types of teaching experience, 
specific needs, interests and the goals of students will be the 
determinants for staff advisement in student selection of content 
areas. Upon the basis of the foregoing factors, students may choose 
specialized courses from two or from several of the content areas. 

Hours 
I. Professional sequence courses 20 

Required of students in all elementary education programs. 

EDN 621— Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 

or 
EDN 622— Nature and Conditions of Human Learning. (Both at 
SSC) 

plus 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

plus 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

II. Courses appropriate to major field and specialization 40 

A. Courses for the conventional major in elementary education. 
1. Major field (content) courses in 

elementary education 25 

Selected, with advisement, from the following 
courses: 

EDN 540— Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 
School (ASC) 

EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) 

EDN 542— Reading and Literature for Children (SSC) 

EDN 591— Science for Elementary and ECE Teachers 
(ASC) 

EDN 601— The Language Arts in the Educative 
Process (SSC) 

EDN 642— Seminar in Elementary Education (SSC) 

EDN 643— Problems in Reading (SSC) 

EDN 691— Environmental Science (ASC) 

EDN 696— Geography for Elementary Teachers (SSC) 

EDN 697— Social Studies for Elementary and ECE 
Teachers (ASC) 

MATH/EDN 592— Modern Mathematics for Elemen- 
tary and ECE Teachers (ASC) 

ZOO/EDN 692— Zoology for Elementary Teachers 
(SSC) 

BOT/EDN 693— Botany for Elementary Teachers 
(SSC) 

CHEM/EDN 694— Chemistry for Elementary Teach- 
ers (SSC) 

PSci/EDN 695— Earth Science for Elementary Teach- 
ers (SSC) 

62 



2. Electives 15 

Elective courses selected with advisement. 

B. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization 
in early childhood education. 

1. Major field courses in elementary education 25 

Same as in A above. 

2. Specified electives only; prescribed courses are: 15 

EDN 627— Child Growth and Development (ASC) 
EDN 647— Curriculum for Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (SSC) 
EDN 802— Practicum in Early Childhood Education 
(ASC or SSC) 

C. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization 
in supervising teacher services.* 

1. Major field courses in elementary education 25 

Same as in A above. 

2. Specified electives only; prescribed courses are: 15 

EDN 5 81 — Directing and Evaluating Student 

Teaching* 
EDN 582— Internship for Supervising Teachers* 
EDN 583— Seminar in Supervision* 

D. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization 
in reading. 

1. Specialization courses in reading 25 

Selected, with advisement, from the following courses: 

EDN 541-Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) 
EDN 643— Problems in Teaching Reading (SSC) 
EDN 644— Issues in Diagnosing and Prescribing in the 

Reading Process (SSC) 
EDN 653— Remedial Reading (Practicum) (ASC) 
EDN 654— Organization and Supervision of the Read- 
ing Program (ASC) 
EDN 543— Reading in the Secondary School (SSC) 

2. Approved electives 15 

These courses specified by the Education Department 
to insure meeting elementary education major re- 
quirements. 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of 
their required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. 
A guide to the location of the courses follows these program outlines. 



'See departmental section on balance of courses. 

63 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



Hours 

I. Professional Sequence Courses 25 

EDN 627— Child Growth and Development (ASC) 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

or 
EDN 637— Foundation of Early Childhood Education (SSC) 
EDN 647— Early Childhood Education Curriculum (SSC) 
EDN 657— Early Childhood Education Methods (ASC) 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

II. Courses appropriate to the early childhood education major 35 

A. Content courses to cover diversified areas 30 

1. Two courses from: 10 

EDN 540— Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 

School and ECE (ASC) 
EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) — 

required if a reading course not taken previously. 
EDN 542— Reading and Literature for Children (SSC) 

2. Three courses from: 15 

EDN 591— Science for Elementary and ECE Teachers 
(ASC) 

MATH/EDN 592— Modern Mathematics for Elemen- 
tary and ECE Teachers (ASC) 

EDN 628— Movement Exploration and Motor Learn- 
ing in Children (SSC) 

EDN 658— Creative Activities in Art, Music, Dance, 
and Drama (SSC) 

EDN 691— Environmental Science (ASC) 

EDN 697— Social Studies for Elementary and ECE 
Teachers (ASC) 

3. Required: 5 

EDN 802-Practicum in ECE (ASC or SSC) 

B. Electives 5 

EXC 522 must be taken if an appropriate course in excep- 
tional children has not been taken previously. 
Selected with advisement. 

EDN 521— Tests and Measurements (ASC) 

EDN 522— Introduction to Exceptional Children (SSC) 

EDN 638— The Young Child and His Family, School, 

Community (ASC) 
EDN 651— Newer Teaching Media II (ASC) 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of 
their required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. 
A guide to the location of the courses follows these program outlines. 



64 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Sequence 20 

Same as Elementary Education Professional Sequence 

EDN 621 or EDN 622 EDN 641 

EDN631 EDN 671 

II. Specialization Courses 30 

EXC 522 EXC 685 EXC 700 may be taken 

EXC 680 EXC 686 in lieu of 685, 686, and 

EXC 681 EXC 687 687, but five additional 

elective hours are needed 
to compensate for lost 
hours (EXC 700 is only a 
10-hour credit course). 

III. Electives 10 

A course in the teaching of reading must be taken if not taken previously. 

EXC 525 EXC 623 EXC 673 

EXC 526 EXC 654 EDN 653 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of 
their required courses and one-half of these elective courses at each College. 
A guide to the location of the courses follows these program outlines. 



BALANCE OF COURSES FOR 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT COURSES 

*The educational supervision courses, EDN 581, 582, and 583, 
are open only to students who receive special permission to enroll in 
them. These courses deal with the preparation of teachers for the 
supervision of student teaching, an undergraduate activity on each 
campus. The departments on each campus may arrange for team 
teaching with a representative from each College. 

**Courses with a double asterisk are offered at both Colleges. 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Professional Sequence Courses 

EDN 621 or 622 EDN 631 

EDN 641 EDN 671 

65 



Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Content Courses for Elementary Education 

EDN 542 ZOO/EDN 692 EDN 540 EDN 691 

EDN 601 BIO/EDN 693 EDN 541 EDN 697 

EDN 642 PSi/EDN 695 EDN 591 MATH/EDN 592 
EDN 643 CHEM/EDN 694 
EDN 696 



Additional Courses for Elementary Education Programs 

EDN 543 EDN 644 EDN 703 EDN 521 EDN 653 EDN 702 

EDN 611 EDN 661 EDN 673** EDN 551 EDN 654 EDN 673** 

EDN 632 EDN 662 EDN 700** EDN 625 EDN 672 EDN 700** 

EDN 651 

EDN 581*, EDN 582*, and EDN 583* 

Early Childhood Education Courses 

EDN 628 EDN 627 

EDN 637 EDN 638 

EDN 647 EDN 657 

EDN 658 EDN 802** 
EDN 802** 

Special Education Courses 

EXC 522 EXC 536 EXC 623 EXC 681 

EXC 525 EXC 680 EXC 654 

NOTE: EXC 685, EXC 686, and EXC 687 may be taken at both Colleges but at least one of 
these three courses must be taken at each College. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A committee of the faculty of the Joint Graduate Education 
Department will administer an oral examination to all candidates for 
the Master's degree. The chairman of the examining committee will 
be the student's adviser. The student and his adviser will select the 
other two members of the examining committee. This committee 
will have at least one representative from each of the two campuses. 
The committee should also have a representative from one of the 
content areas on the student's degree plan. 

The chairman will select, in consultation with the student, the 
date, time, and place for the examination and will report this 
information and the results of the examination to the Coordinator. 



66 



The Coordinator shall notify the Deans for Graduate Studies ten 
days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, date 
and time of the examination and the composition of the Committee. 
The result of the examination will be reported to the Deans for 
Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 

Graduate Courses in Education 

EDUCATION 521. Tests and Measurements. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Principles and procedures in evaluating pupil growth. 

EDUCATION 540. Teaching Language Arts in Elementary School. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Exploration in the four broad areas of the language arts. 
Investigation of pertinent research of the past decade; opportunities 
for enriching experiences with media through demonstration. 

EDUCATION 541. Methods of Teaching Reading. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Basic principles and methods underlying the elementary school 
reading program. 

EDUCATION 542. Reading and Literature for Children. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

This course is designed to acquaint elementary teachers with the 
stimulating language environment of the wide world of literature for 
children. The literature approach to language learning seeks to assist 
the teacher in guiding children to become active, sensitive learners 
who seek to explore, inquire, and discover. 

EDUCATION 543. Reading in the Secondary School. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

This course is designed to acquaint teachers with teaching reading 
in content areas. 

EDUCATION 551. Newer Teaching Media I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The first course in a two-course sequence. Multisensory learning 
and the utilization of audiovisual materials, newer teaching hardware, 
and programmed materials. 

EDUCATION 581. Directing and Evaluating Student Teaching. (5 
quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 

Information, skills and understandings required for effective 
supervision of student teachers. Selected teachers. 

EDUCATION 582. Internship for Supervising Teachers. (5 quarter 
hours). SSC and ASC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Cooperative field experience involving public school teachers, 
student teachers, college personnel. 



67 



EDUCATION 583. Seminar in Supervision. (5 quarter hours). SSC 
and ASC. 

An opportunity for experienced supervising teachers to evaluate 
criteria and to develop plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 

EDUCATION 591. Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Opportunities for acquiring basic knowledge in science appropriate 
for the elementary grades. 

EDUCATION 601. The Language Arts in the Educative Process. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Provisions for an examination of language developments. Current 
issues and recent research in the language arts curriculum. Theoret- 
ically and practically, students will be aided in finding adequate 
solutions to language problems which confront them in the daily 
teaching experience. 

EDUCATION 661. Philosophy and History of Education. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

Modern philosophical systems and their impact on educational 
theory and practice. 

EDUCATION 621. Advanced Studies in Human Growth and 
Development. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A comprehensive view of human growth and development with 
emphasis upon the recent literature in these fields. 

EDUCATION 622. The Nature and Conditions of Human Learn- 
ing. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An advanced study of the various theories of learning with 
emphasis upon the latest ideas in this field. 

EDUCATION 625. Contemporary Problems in Educational 
Psychology. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Two or more courses in 
psychology or sociology or a combination of the two. 

A seminar to explore contemporary problems of a psycho-social 
nature affecting education. 

EDUCATION 631. Social Foundations of Education. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Basic graduate course in the contribution of the social sciences to 
education, focused on the significant issues and problems of 
education. 

EDUCATION 632. Education and Minority Group Problems. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of intergroup education related to the problems of 
American ethnic, racial, and religious minorities. 



68 



EDUCATION 641. Curriculum Planning. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Trends, issues, and understandings needed for curriculum develop- 
ment and teaching. 

EDUCATION 642. Seminar in Elementary Education. (Credit 
varies.) SSC. 

Opportunities to analyze issues, theories and practices in elemen- 
tary education. Credit, one to five quarter hours. 

EDUCATION 643. Problems in Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Investigation of problems met in the teaching of reading. 

EDUCATION 644. Issues in Diagnosing and Prescribing in the 
Reading Process. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisites: EDN 541, EDN 643, or 
approval of instructor. 

Designed to evaluate primary issues in differentiated instruction. 
Examination of techniques employed in diagnosing and prescribing 
for reading difficulties. 

EDUCATION 651. Newer Teaching Media II. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: EDN 551. 

An advanced course continuing in-depth study of newer teaching 
media. 

EDUCATION 653. Remedial Reading. (Practicum). (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: EDN 644 or approval of instructor. 

A study of the various methods and materials utilized to test and 
teach remedial readers. The student will be required to tutor one 
poor reader. 

EDUCATION 661. Principles and Practices of Guidance. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

An introduction to the philosophy and procedures of guidance in 
both the elementary and secondary school. 

EDUCATION 662. Guidance in Elementary Schools. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Application of the guidance point of view and guidance techniques 
to the elementary school classroom. Emphasis is upon the teacher's 
role in cooperating with professional guidance workers. 

EDUCATION 671. Educational Research. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Methodology of educational research and its application to 
instruction and guidance. 

EDUCATION 672. Field Project. (5 hours credit). SSC. 
An "on-the-job" research project dealing with improvement in the 
student's specific situation. 

EDUCATION 673. Individual Research. (5 hours credit). ASC or 
SSC. 



69 



EDUCATION 675. Individual Study in Education. (1 to 5 hours). 
ASC. Opportunities provided for supervised research and inde- 
pendent study in selected areas. Research and reading in education to 
meet the needs of students involved. Designed for students with a 
knowledge of research. All work offered on an individual basis with 
the approval of department chairman, advisor, and instructor 
concerned. Prerequisite: EDN 671. 

EDUCATION 676. Individual Study in Education. (5 hours). SSC. 
Advanced individual study similar to EDN 695. Approval of 
department chairman, advisor, and instructor concerned necessary. 
Prerequisites: EDN 671. 

EDUCATION 691. Environmental Science. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Exploration of science principles through problem-solving. 
Designed to make environmental science situations meaningful. 

ZOO/EDN 692. Zoology for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Modern approaches to teaching the biological sciences. Emphasis 
on understanding of life processes in the animal kingdom. 

BOT/EDN 693. Botany for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lecture — laboratory course dealing with principles involved in 
classifying and identifying plant life. 

CHEM/EDN 694. Chemistry for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A study of the more important metallic and non-metallic elements 
with emphasis on practical application at the elementary school level. 

PSci/EDN 695. Earth Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

Composition of earth, classification and identification of rocks 
and minerals. 

EDUCATION 696. Geography for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A critical examination of instructional procedures and techniques 
in teaching geography in elementary grades. Selection, organization 
and presentation of structured facets of human environment, both 
cultural and physical. Emphasis given to the conceptual approach in 
the analysis of space and regional interaction. 

EDUCATION 697. Social Studies for Elementary Teachers. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Investigation of newer approaches to social studies teaching. 
Emphasis on related skills as map and graph reading. Analysis of 
behavioral objectives for social studies teaching. 



70 



EDUCATION 700. Internship. (10 hours credit). ASC or SSC. 
(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Students who hold teaching positions in schools and /or clinic 
settings will be supervised by college staff members for one academic 
year. Supervisors will observe and hold conferences with each 
candidate. Students must complete one academic year to receive 
credit. 

EDUCATION 702. Seminar in Education for Staff Development. 
(Variable credit). ASC. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an 
approved staff development activity sponsored by a local school 
system. Admission to the course must be approved by the student's 
adviser and by the department head. 

This course is designed to provide a framework through which 
teachers and local school systems, in conjunction with the college, 
may offer graduate credit for approved staff development activities. 
Credit for this course may be approved for either content or elective 
work. 

With a change in content, this course may be repeated for addi- 
tional credit. 

EDCUATION 703. Seminar in Education for Staff Development. 
(Variable credit). SSC. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an 
approved staff development activity sponsored by a local school 
system. Admission to the course must be approved by the student's 
adviser and by the department head. 

This course is designed to provide a framework through which 
teachers and local school systems, in conjunction with the college, 
may offer graduate credit for approved staff development activities. 
Credit for this course may be approved for either content or elective 
work. 

With a change in content, this course may be repeated for 
additional credit. 

Graduate Courses in Education — 
Early Childhood Education 

EDN 627. Child Growth and Development. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Lecture and laboratory. Basic concepts and problems of child 
development; observation, behavior patterns, child study. 

EDN 628. Movement Exploration and Motor Learning in Children. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Develop understandings, skills, and teaching techniques and 
methods in the basic activities appropriate to the teacher of 
movement education. 



71 



EDN 637. Foundations of Early Childhood Education. (5-0-5) 

ssc. 

Historical developments, philosophy and objectives of nursery 
schools, kindergartens, and day care centers; exploration of teacher- 
child and teacher-family interactions, diagnosis and evaluation of 
children. 

EDN 638. The Young Child and His Family, School, Community 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Interaction with community for services and resources. Family 
study from many different angles, utilizing data from various fields, 
developing skills in procedures and techniques for working with 
parents. 

EDN 647. Early Childhood Education Curriculum. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Content, approaches, methods and materials appropriate for 
young child as presented in interdisciplinary or experience approach 
emphasizing how language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, 
and the creative arts are adopted to skills and needs of children. 

EDN 657. Early Childhood Education Methods. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of research and programs for children under eight and 
implications for program development. Developing skills in trans- 
lating concepts into classroom practice for young children. 

EDN 658. Creative Activities in Art, Music, Dance and Drama. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Course focuses on activities in each of four areas and presented in 
an interdisciplinary approach. 

EDN 802. Practicum in Early Childhood Education. (5 hours 
credit). ASC or SSC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Supervised experience in classroom with children under six. 
Seminars and projects planned according to students' needs. 



Graduate Courses in Education- 
Exceptional Children 

EXC 522. Introduction to Exceptional Children. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An introductory study of the identification, diagnosis, and 
education of the atypical child. 

EXC 525. Mental Hygiene in Teaching. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A consideration of the forces and influences on what constitutes 
normal behavior in personal and social relationships within the 
school setting. Student behavior, teacher behavior, and student- 
teacher interaction dynamics will receive major attention. Open to 
qualified undergraduate students, graduate students, and teachers 
seeking renewal of certificates. 



72 



EXC 526. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. (5-0-5). SSC. 

EXC 623. Assessment and Measurement of the Exceptional Child. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

This course will emphasize the meanings and interpretations of 
psychological, psychiatric, educational, and other evaluations. It will 
attempt to help the teacher understand and make relevant the test 
specialists' report. 

EXC 654. Behavioral Intervention Procedures for Children. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

To acquaint students with historical background, developments, 
concepts, definitions, terminology, and techniques of behavioral 
intervention, as well as application of such procedures. 

EXC 673. Independent Research. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. 

EXC 680. Behavior Pathology in Children. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequi- 
site: EXC 522. 

A study of the epidemeology, etiology, prognosis, and treatment 
of behavior disorders in children. An extensive examination of the 
social milieu will characterize the course. 

EXC 681. Education of the Emotionally Disturbed. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: EXC 680. 

The student will survey the various types of programs and 
approaches historically and currently in operation for the emotion- 
ally disturbed child. Emphasis will be placed on those programs 
within the public school setting. 

EXC 685-686-687. Practicum in Special Education. (5 hours credit 
each course). (Grades awarded, S or U only.) 

EXC 685. Five hours to be taken among the first twenty -five 
hours of the student's program. During this time the student will be 
required to interact with behavior disordered and/or multiple 
handicapped children a minimum of eight clock hours per week in 
programs designed to ameliorate the disability. It is recommended 
that the student participate in two or more programs. ASC or SSC. 

EXC 686. Prerequisite: EXC 685. Five quarter hours of individual 
studies under the direction of the student's adviser, or the adviser's 
designate, to be taken prior to the five final hours of practicum. The 
individual studies program will be designed so that the student 
develops proficiency in a minimum of one mode of treatment for 
behavior disordered children. The student will be required not only 
to develop expertise in a theoretical approach but be afforded the 
opportunity to interact with a student, or students, in tutorial 
situations for practical applications of the theoretical model selected 
for study. ASC or SSC. 



73 



EXC 687. Prerequisite: EXC 686. Five hours taken during the 
terminal stages of the student's program. The student will be 
required to serve a minimum of ten clock hours per week in facilities 
designed for behavior disordered and/or multiple handicapped 
children. The student will be expected to have direct involvement in 
teaching exceptional children. A portion of this five quarter hours 
must be served in a residential facility. ASC or SSC. 

EXC 700. Internship. (10 hours credit). ASC or SSC. (Grade 
awarded, S or U only.) See EDN 700 for general requirements; 
course runs one academic year. 

ENGLISH 

FACULTY 



Dr. Luetta Milledge, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Hugh 
Pendexter, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Brooks, (ASC); Dr. Daub, 
(SSC); Dr. Jones, (ASC); Dr. Killorin, (ASC); Dr. Lawson, (ASC); Dr. 
Lunz, (SSC); Dr. Maher, (SSC); Dr. O'Neil, (SSC); Dr. Propst, (ASC); 
Dr. Seale, (ASC); and Dr. Strozier, (ASC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in English 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Luetta Millege 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of English, in cooperation with the Department 
of Education, offers a program of study leading to the Master of 
Education degree with a concentration in English. The objectives of 
this program of study are : 

1. To upgrade the teaching of secondary school English by 
increasing the competencies of English teachers in the areas of 
linguistics, composition, and literature; 

2. To enable teachers of English in Secondary schools to pursue 
study that will enrich their skills, knowledge, and understanding 
in the teaching of language, composition, and literature; 

3. To provide opportunities for professional growth and cultural 
enrichment for individuals holding the bachelor's degree but 
having no further degree or certification objectives; 

4. To enable teachers of English in secondary schools to qualify 
for the T-5 certificate. 

74 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

AND 

GENERAL COURSE PREREQUISITES 

All students entering the M.Ed, program in English must present 
the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test in Literature and 
English. A student who scores 560 or above and who meets the 
general requirements for Regular Admission will be given Regular 
Admission Status. A student who scores below 560 will be limited to 
Conditional status (or Special status if required by other admissions 
criteria) and will be required to retake the examination until the 560 
score is attained or, alternatively, must take supporting work as 
prescribed by the English Department as a condition for Regular 
status and as a condition for enrollment in any graduate English 
course. The prescribed work shall consist of four undergraduate 
courses on the 300 or 400 level, approved by the student's adviser, in 
which no grade lower than B shall be made. Half of these courses 
shall be taken on each Campus. It is crucial that the student have his 
adviser's approval before scheduling undergraduate courses as sup- 
porting work. (These approved undergraduate courses should be 
entered on the students advisement sheet.) 

Upon meeting one of these two conditions (560 score or com- 
pleting the prescribed supporting work), the student may enroll 
in graduate English courses and may also advance to Regular status in 
accordance with general admission requirements. 

ADVISEMENT 
Each student admitted to the program in English will be assigned 
an academic adviser from the English Department and a professional 
adviser from the Education Department. As soon as the student is 
notified of this assignment, he should arrange for a conference with 
his advisers. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Summary of Requirements 

Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 15 

II. English Courses (required, plus electives) 40 

III. Free Elective Courses 5 

IV. Balance of Courses 



75 



I. Professional Education Courses 15 

EDN 621— Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 
(SSC) 

or 
EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning (SSC) 

or 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

II. English Courses 40 

A. A student may count no more than 15 hours of 500 level work 
toward the degree. 

B. English 620, 621, and 622 are required of all students. 

C. English 500, 503, 690, and 691 may be taken twice if the course is 
offered a second time with a different topic. 

III. Free Elective Course 5 

Because the courses in the teaching of reading and in exceptional children 
are required for certification, a student must present at least one of these as 
part of his undergraduate record before he will be admitted to candidacy for 
the M.Ed, degree in English or must present the equivalent graduate course 
in addition to the sixty (60) hours normally required in the M.Ed, program. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of 
their required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. 
A guide to the location of the courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

ENG 503 ENG 642 ENG 500 ENG 641 

ENG621 ENG 660 ENG 630 ENG 650 

ENG 622 ENG 665 ENG 625 ENG 662 

ENG 626 ENG 666 ENG 627 ENG 664 

ENG 630 ENG 691 ENG 631 ENG 690 

ENG 640 

A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the Education 
Department section of this Bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Each candidate for the Master of Education degree with a con- 
centration in English must pass a written comprehensive exam- 
ination. The comprehensive examination will be based on the reading 
list in language and literature which must be secured by the student 
at the time of his matriculation. The student may choose to be 
examined under any reading list in force during the time of his 
enrollment. Copies of the reading list are available in the office of the 
Coordinator. For more specific information concerning the compre- 
hensive examination, contact the Coordinator. 

76 



The comprehensive examination covers two areas: 1) literature 
before 1800; 2) literature after 1800. The separate examinations are 
to be taken in the course of the student's program, preferably before 
the last quarter. At least one of the tests in literature will include a 
question concerning bibliographical and research procedures. The 
student must pass all three examinations in order to receive his 
degree. After two unsuccessful attempts at any one part of the 
examination, a student may not apply to repeat that section for at 
least two quarters during which he may do guided study to take 
recommended courses in order to make up his deficiencies. In light 
of the comprehensive requirements, the student is strongly urged to 
take an additional course in linguistics. Except for the stipulation 
that he must wait at least two quarters if he fails any examination 
twice, there is no limit on the number of times that a student may 
take an examination. Examination results are designated S or U. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for 
Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date and time of the examination and the composi- 
tion of the committee. The result of the examination will be 
reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within seven days after 
the examination. 

Graduate Courses in English 

Regular admission status is prerequisite to enrollment in any 
graduate course in English. 

ENGLISH 500. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours credit). ASC. 

ENGLISH 503. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours credit). SSC. 

ENGLISH 620. Practical Criticism I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Composition and literary theory will constitute the basis for 
practical criticism of literary works. The relationship between 
literary theory and problems of teaching composition and literary 
interpretation will be explored, and various contexts (i.e., formal- 
istic, socio-historical, archetypal) for interpreting the work of 
literature will be examined. Course requirements will include oral 
and written analysis of literary works written before 1800, selected 
primarily from the Graduate English reading list. 

ENGLISH 621. Practical Criticism II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Course description is the same as ENG 620 above, but utilizes 
literary works written after 1800, selected primarily from the 
graduate English reading list. 



77 



ENGLISH 622. Approaches to Language. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A survey of the components of language study as well as the 
various approaches to language, meaning, and syntax. Relationships 
between the teacher's language study and classroom implementation 
of various facets of it will be explored. 

ENGLISH 625. Chaucer. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 626. Shakespeare. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 627. Milton. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 630. American Literature to 1840. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 631. American Literature, 1840-1912. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 640. British Literature, Before 1660. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 641. British Literature, 1660-1830. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 642. British Literature, 1830-1912. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 650. British and American Literature, 1912 to the 
Present. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 660. Studies in Ethnic Literature. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 662. Literature: Its Intellectual Backgrounds. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

ENGLISH 664. Studies in Comparative Literature. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 665. Descriptive Linguistics and Transformational 
Grammar. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the English sound system, the system of word 
composition and transformational syntax. 

ENGLISH 666. Historical Linguistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 690. Special Studies: Independent Study or Seminar 
(1 to 5 hours credit). ASC. 

ENGLISH 691. Special Studies: Independent Study or Seminar. (1 
to 5 hours credit). SSC. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FACULTY 

Dr. Elmer Dean, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Roger Warlick, 
Department Head, (ASC). 



78 






History 

Dr. Duncan, (ASC); Dr. Gross, (ASC); Dr. Lanier, (ASC); Dr. 
Patterson, (ASC); Dr. Mclver, (SSC); Dr. Simpson, (SSC); and Dr. 
Smith, (SSC). 

Political Science 

Dr. Byers, (SSC); Dr. Clark, (ASC); Dr. Coyle, (ASC); Dr. Harris, 
(SSC); Dr. McCarthy, (ASC); Dr. Newman, (ASC); Dr. Rhee, (ASC); 
and Dr. Walton, (SSC). 

Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 

Master of Education in History 

and in Political Science 

Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Roger Warlick 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate programs in history and in political 
science are: 

1. To increase the academic and professional skills, the compe- 
tence and the enthusiasm of secondary teachers in history and 
political science and in social studies generally. 

2. To increase the teacher's knowledge and understanding of the 
nature and conditions of learning and the learner, at the same 
time making the teacher aware of the major features and 
problems of secondary education in the American social order. 

3. To accomplish these objectives by working jointly in a situation 
reflective of the racial and social make-up of American society 
and, in so doing, to provide a context in which teachers 
themselves may develop personally as well as academically. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in history or in political 
science must satisfy all general admission requirements of the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program, including the requirement that the GRE 
Aptitude or NTE Common, with appropriate advanced or area test, 
be completed prior to full admission. The results of these examin- 
ations will then serve as a basis for academic advisement. 



79 



Students must also satisfy a prerequisite of 15 quarter hours of 
undergraduate work in the major discipline before any course can be 
taken for graduate credit. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Students who have earned graduate credits at one or more 
accredited institutions may, under certain circumstances, transfer a 
limited number of quarter hours of such credits to be applied toward 
the M.Ed, degree programs in history and political science. Such 
transfer of credits is handled on an individual basis and requires the 
written approval of the student's adviser and the Coordinator. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the program in either history or 
political science, each student should contact the Coordinator to 
secure an adviser. As soon as he is notified of his assigned adviser, the 
student should arrange for a conference with his adviser and begin 
planning his degree program. Failure by the student to consult 
regularly with his adviser may greatly lengthen the time necessary to 
complete the program. Each student should feel free to consult his 
adviser as often as is necessary. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

A. Major in History. 

The typical history program for those students already holding a T-4 
certificate in an appropriate field is outlined below: 



Quarter Hours 
Minimum 

I. History Courses 30 

II. Professional Education Courses 15 

EDN 622— Nature and Conditions of Human Learning, 

or 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education 

and 
EDN 641 — Curriculum Planning 

and 
EDN 671— Educational Research 

III. Approved Electives 15 

An appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) 

must be taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 



80 



Major in Political Science. 

The typical political science program for those students already holding a 

T-4 certificate in an appropriate field is outlined below: 

I. Political Science Courses 30 

These courses must include 5 hours in each of the following areas: 

a. American government and public policy. 

b. Comparative politics. 

c. International relations and foreign policy. 

d. Political theory. 

II. Professional Education Courses 15 

Same as Professional Education Courses for History. 
EDN 622 or EDN 631 and EDN 641, and EDN 671 

III. Approved Electives 15 

An appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) 
must be taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 

Special program (for students without T-4 certification). Students without 
prior certification may need a total of 70-80 quarter hours to complete the 
M.Ed, program in either History of Political Science. An illustrative program 
is shown below, but the student will need individual guidance. 

I. Professional Education 40 

a. Foundations Courses 10 

Examples: EDN 611, EDN 622, EDN 631 

b. Methods and Curriculum 10 

Example: EDN 641 and others 

c. Educational Research — EDN 671 5 

d. Student teaching or equivalent on-the-job 

experience— workshops, etc ' 10 

e. Electives 5 



II. History or Political Science Courses 30 

See section below on "Use of Electives" for further information on 
hours in the major field. 

D. General Requirements. 

Use of Electives 

The flexibility provided by the 15 hours of "Aproved Electives" 
normally makes it possible to meet the other program guidelines within 
a 60-hour total. But, students should be aware, for example, that 
counting both graduate and undergraduate classwork, they are required 
to have a total of at least 30 hours in their major teaching area (i.e., 
American or European History, or American Government). There may 
also be areas where undergraduate preparation was weak or unavailable, 
such as professional education, non-western traditions, etc. Such 
problems can best be solved on an individual basis with the help of the 
faculty adviser. 



81 



Students should be aware that regardless of their major, state 
certification criteria recommend that social studies teachers include in 
their programs preparation in the following: American history and 
government, conflicting ideologies, the modern world, Western heritage, 
and non-Western traditions. 

Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one 
half of their required courses and one half of their elective courses at 
each of the two colleges. 

Each College offers an almost equal number of courses every quarter. 
Courses to be offered at the two Colleges during the 1976-1977 and 
1977-1978 academic years are listed below. Other courses are author- 
ized in the curriculum and are listed in the following sections on 
graduate courses in history and in political science. These courses may 
be offered on demand. 







History Courses 




Savannah State College 


Arms 


trong State College 


HIS 517 


HIS 609 


HIS 681 


HIS 500 


HIS 535 HIS 641 


HIS 531 


HIS 621 


HIS 695 


HIS 514 


HIS 619 HIS 622 


HIS 534 


HIS 640 


HIS 696 


HIS 515 


HIS 633 HIS 690 


HIS 547 


HIS 680 


HIS 690 


HIS 516 




HIS 606 











Political Science Courses 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

POS600 POS624 POS 683 POS 511 POS 546 POS 620 

POS 608 POS 625 POS 684 POS 535 POS 605 POS 626 

POS 610 POS 635 POS 690 POS 540 POS 606 POS 691 

POS 616 POS 680 



A guide to the location of the Education courses is in the Education Section 
of this Bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

An integral part of the graduate experience is the achievement of a 
comprehensive understanding of the analytical skills and of the 
current state of knowledge and scholarship basic to one's field. It is 
the purpose of the Comprehensive Examination both to demonstrate 
this understanding and to aid in further synthesizing its many 
aspects. Thus, the examination itself should be in part a new 
experience, producing new insights and not merely a rehearsal of 
previous ones. 

Satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations, written 
and/or oral, will thus be required of all degree candidates. Candidates 



82 



should notify their major professor and the Coordinator of the 
program of their readiness to be examined at the time they apply for 
the degree — i.e., no later than mid-term of their next-to-final 
quarter. At this time the specific fields and reading list to be covered 
will be defined, the make-up of the examining committee deter- 
mined, and the date of the exam set. The examination normally 
occurs before mid-term of the student's final quarter. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for 
Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the examination and the 
composition of the committee. The result of the examination will be 
reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after 
the examination. 

The Coordinator will notify the student regarding the result of the 
examinations. The examination papers and/or comments of the 
examining committee will become part of the student's permanent 
file in the Department, and the student may request a conference 
with his major professor and advisers for the purpose of reviewing 
the examination papers. 

A student may repeat the Comprehensive Examinations as many 
times as necessary to demonstrate the required level of competence. 

Graduate Courses in History 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is 
the general prerequisite that a student must have completed the 
equivalent of 15 hours of undergraduate work in history to become 
eligible to take graduate work for credit toward the Master of 
Education degree in History. 

HISTORY 500. Historical Method. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research; 
treats problems of investigation, organization, and writing through 
discussion and actual research experience in local history. 

HISTORY 501. Seminar in Georgia History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A research seminar dealing with various aspects of Georgia's past 
with emphasis on original research and writing. 

HISTORY 502. United States: Colonial and Revolutionary. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement 
and growth of the English colonies of North America, the American 
triumph over France in the New World, the drastic change in British 



83 



colonial policy and the rise of American opposition to it, the 
achievement of independence and the establishment of the United 
States under the Constitution. 

HISTORY 505. United States: 1914 to Present. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Covering the most recent period in U.S. History, the course 
emphasizes political, economic, and social issues. 

HISTORY 514. United States: Diplomatic History I. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from 
colonial times through the Civil War. 

HISTORY 515. United States: Diplomatic History II. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A continuation of History 514 to the present. 

HISTORY 516. United States: Constitutional History. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution 
of the United States. 

HISTORY 517. Reform Movements in American History. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

A research and readings course designed to acquaint the student 
with the dynamics of American reformism. 

HISTORY 531. History of Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A survey of the social, cultural, economic, political, religious, and 
intellectual history of Latin America from colonial times to present. 

HISTORY 532. The Russian Revolution. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes 
for the collapse of Tsarism, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the 
Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War. 

HISTORY 534. Contemporary Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Twentieth century influences that are producing socio-economic 
unrest in much of Latin America. 

HISTORY 535. History of Soviet Foreign Policy. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The course reviews historically the development of Soviet Foreign 
policy with West European States, notably Germany, and also with 
the non-European world through 1917-1940, World War II, and Cold 
War phases. Special attention will be given in this last phase to 
U.S.— Soviet rivalry, Soviet relations with other communist states in 
Eastern Europe, China, and with the Third World, and to the recent 
moves toward detente. 

HISTORY 547. The French Revolution. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
France, with emphasis on the impact of the French Revolution and 
the career of Napoleon upon the major European nations. 

84 



HISTORY 602. United States: Tyler to Lincoln. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An intensive investigation of the social, economic, political, and 
intellectual conditions in the United States between 1840 and 1860. 

HISTORY 603. United States: Nineteenth Century Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

A research seminar in the course and development of political 
movements in the United States during the Middle Period. 

HISTORY 606. United States: Afro-American History I. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar on the history of ideas, culture ideologies, and 
institutions that influenced Afro-Americans from the colonial period 
to 1860. 

HISTORY 607. United States: Afro-American History II. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar in Afro-American thought and institutions — a 
continuation of History 606. The course critically evaluates Afro- 
American culture during and following the civil war. 

HISTORY 609. History of Afro-American Higher Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The history of Afro-American higher education from the 19th 
century to the present with emphasis on method and philosophy. 

HISTORY 610. United States: Economic History I. (5-0-5). SSC. 
The history, economic ideas, ideologies, practices, and institutions 
that have influenced Americans from the colonial period to 1860. 

HISTORY 611. United States: Economic History II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Post-1860 American economic history and institutions that have 
influenced Americans from the Civil War to the present. A 
continuation of History 610. 

HISTORY 613. Seminar in the Puritan Ethic. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the evolution and secularization of the Puritan ethic in 
American society. Special emphasis will be given to the theorists who 
created the ethic and to those thinkers who have attempted to 
humanize it. 

HISTORY 617. Seminar in Pre-1860 Euro-American Reform 
Movements. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Problems in Euro-American cultural, religious, intellectual, and 
institutional development with special emphasis on cultural national- 
ism, naturalism, Darwinism, romanticism, and humanitarianism. 

HISTORY 619. Studies in American Thought. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A reading and research course devoted to the examination of 
topics in the history of American thought. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. 



85 



HISTORY 621. Far East in Modern Times. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The strategic economic, political, and ideological factors that 
shape the destinies of Far Eastern countries will be critically 
examined. The political actions of the dominant powers of the East, 
Japan, Communist China, and India, will be studied as well as those 
of the lesser nations, such as Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, 
Thailand, Burma, Afghanistan, Cambodia, Laos, and the Vietnams. 
The interplay of the United States and Europe with respect to the 
economic and political issues affecting the Far East will be 
high-lighted. 

HISTORY 633. Topics in Modern Russian History. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Selected topics in 19th and 20th Century Russian intellectual, 

political, economic, and social history. 

HISTORY 636. European Diplomatic History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An intensive study into the origins and development of European 
diplomacy, the instruments of power, the interrelationship of 
diplomacy and military forces, the limits of national power, 
economic objectives, and the fundamentals of national objectives. 
Europe's special political and military role will be examined, as it 
applies to Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Austria, and 
Spain. The special impingements of American diplomacy on 
European national interests will be studied, in complement with such 
international institutions as the League of Nations, United Nations, 
Common Market, and NATO. 

HISTORY 640. England: Tudor-Stuart Topics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional, 
and religious issues of English history, 1485-1660. Class concen- 
tration will be directed to selected topics or periods which will be 
augmented by independent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 641. England: Restoration-Hanoverian Topics. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional, 
and religious issues of English history, 1660-1815. Class concen- 
tration will be directed to selected topics or periods which will be 
augmented by independent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 645. Studies in Early Modern Europe. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Selected topics in XVI and XVII century European life will be 
studied, e.g., the religious controversies, geographical expansion and 
the scientific revolution. Heavy emphasis will be given independent 
research and presentations by the student. 

HISTORY 650. Topics in Modern European History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World 
Wars. 

86 



HISTORY 680. Readings in American History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

HISTORY 681. Readings in European History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

HISTORY 690. Independent Study. (Credit varies). SSC. 
Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 691. Independent Study. (Credit varies). ASC. 
Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 695. American Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An extensive survey of the historiographical trends evident in the 
writing of American History with emphasis on major interpretations 
and the influence of major historians. 

HISTORY 696. European Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lectures and readings to illustrate the major developments in 
the study of the European past. 

Graduate Courses in Political Science 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is 
the general requirement that a student must have completed the 
equivalent of 15 hours of undergraduate work in Political Science to 
become eligible to take graduate work for credit toward the Master 
of Education degree in Political Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 511. American Presidency. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the Presidency, with the 
principal emphasis on the relations of the executive branch with the 
Congress and the Court system. Some attention will be given to the 
evolution of the Presidency to its present dominant position in the 
American political process. (Completion of a survey course in 
American History is desirable.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 530. Seminar in Empirical Political 
Thought. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A course primarily of readings centered on the analysis of the 
epistemological and methodological foundations of contemporary 
political and social science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 535. Origins of Totalitarianism. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

An analysis of the socio-psychological bases of modern totalitarian 
movements. Major emphasis will be placed on pre-World War II Nazi 
Germany. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 540. Comparative Political Analysis. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

This course is mainly theoretical. It deals with the various 
approaches, concepts, and methodologies that are being used in the 

87 



analysis of comparative politics, viz: the traditional approach 
(formal -legal), group theory of politics, systems analysis, structural- 
functional analysis, communications theory, decision-making theory, 
game theory, etc. At the same time, each approach is examined as it 
is used in comparing the politics of various countries. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 546. Far Eastern Government and Politics. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Description and comparative analysis of the political systems of 
Communist China and Japan. Special attention is given to historical 
development, political institutions and processes, political culture, 
political socialization, and contemporary problems. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 600. Research Methods in Political 
Science. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course covers the different methodological approaches to 
political data, data gathering, and data analysis. It also gives an 
overview of the philosophy of science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 603. Public Policy. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Here an analysis is made of the way public policy is made, who 
influences it, and the varied techniques Political Scientist have 
developed to study it. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 604. Principles of Public Administration. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is to acquaint the student with the chief concepts, 
theories, ideas and models in Public Administration. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 605. State Government. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A comparative study of the structure, function and political 
process of state, county and other special government units in the 
United States. Special emphasis will be given to the states of Georgia, 
Florida, and South Carolina. Field studies will be utilized to gain 
first-hand knowledge whenever possible. 






POLITICAL SCIENCE 606. Urban Government. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the structure, function, and political processes of city 
and other local governments in the United States. Special attention 
will be given to the workings of city government in the state of 
Georgia in general and to the cities in the Savannah area in particular. 
Field studies will be utilized to gain first-hand knowledge whenever 
possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 608. Urban Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course surveys the theories, the approaches, models, and the 
techniques of political activity in the urban metro areas. In addition, 
it also reviews the proposals and solutions for urban reform. 



88 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 610. American Political Parties. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar which will consider the structural-functional nomen- 
clature of American political parties as well as make analytical 
inquiry into their growth, development, aims, and primary concerns. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 615. American Supreme Court. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar analyzing the key problems and issues in the judicial 
process: judicial behavior, judicial policy making, judicial biography, 
and the court in the political process. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 616. Black Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis is made in this course of the areas of specialization in 
Black politics as well as the numerous political activities in the Black 
community. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 619. American Foreign Policy. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

This course will span the period from the American Revolution to 
the Vietnamese War. Areas of major interest will be America's early 
isolation, its emergence as an International power, participation in 
major wars, and as a primary force in the United Nations. The course 
will examine the relationship of the United States with the USSR, 
United Kingdom, Mainland China, and other world powers. This 
study will show the supporting roles of the U.S. Military, the CIA, 
AID, USIA, Peace Corps, and other agencies. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 620. Topics in International Relations. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Prerequisite : undergraduate work in the field or permission of the 
instructor. A seminar course with specific titles announced as 
offered. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 621. International Relations: Far East. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The politics, people, movements and ideologies are surveyed for 
the impact on Asia and the world. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 623. International Relations: Africa. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The diplomacy, alliances and internal politics of the Black African 
countries are analyzed and studied for trends and continuities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 624. USSR and Red China in Conflict. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course will consider and evaluate Chinese and Russian 
relations before and after the 1917 Communist Revolution. The 
causes of Sino-Soviet conflicts will be traced to their economic, 
political, strategic, as well as ideologue, will be compared with the 



89 



political, strategic, as well as ideological sources. The history of the 
break between the Soviet Union and the Peoples Republic of China 
and the implication of this hiatus for the security of the modern 
world will be critically examined. 



: 

It 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 625. Communist China in World Politics 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course stresses the international role of the Peoples Republi 
of China. The growth of China's Communist element is traced first 
through its tenuous relationship with Nationalist China and then as 
the successor to Nanking. Particular emphasis is given to the changing 
relations of Red China to the USSR, the United States, Japan, and 
the developing nations of Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. 
Communist China's interest in world revolution, cultural programs, 
and insurgencies are examined against its break with and distrust of 
the Soviet Union. Reasons are explored for the detente of China with 
the United States. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 626. Seminar in International Law. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A detailed study of selected topics within the field of Inter- 
national Law. Emphasis will be on wide reading, written reports and 
classroom discussion and analysis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 627. International Organizations. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

This course will analyze the roles and internal structures of the 
United Nations, the Common Market, NATO, the International 
Court, the Organization of American States, the World Bank, and 
other international organizations. Of special interest will be the 
particular influence of the United States in these organizations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 628. Communism, Capitalism, and Chris- 
tianity. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is a study of the origins of Communism, Capitalism, 
and Christianity and their interrelationship in the modern world. 
Students will explore the similarities and differences of the three 
factors in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. The effects of these 
forces will be studied as they impinged on various countries and on 
such dominant personalities as Joseph Stalin, Woodrow Wilson, Sun 
Yat Sen, De Gaulle, Francisco Franco, and John D. Rockefeller. Of 
special interest in this study will be such periods of intense 
Communist-Capitalistic relationship as the Post-World War I period, 
the epoch of Nazism, the "Cold War," and the Russo-American 
Detente. 



90 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 629. Contemporary Problems in Inter- 
national Relations. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis of the major areas of conflict — or cooperation — in 
the international arena is made to highlight trends, patterns and 
continuities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 630. World Ideological Movements. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

An analysis of the major ideological movements conditioning the 
mind of contemporary man. The course will focus primarily on 
democratic capitalism, fascism, socialism, and communism. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 635. Black Political Thought. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the major thinkers in the Black community and the 
effects of their ideas on the concepts of freedom, liberalism, 
conservatism, state, obligation, consent, etc., for the purpose of its 
intellectual value and comparative possibilities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 642. Latin American Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A survey of the key Latin American countries and their politics is 
made for insight, comparison, and prospects. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 649. Revolutions and Revolutionaries. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course addresses itself to the causes and characteristics of 
revolutions, from the American Revolution to the recent social 
revolution of Blacks, -women, and minorities. Each major revolution 
selected will be examined concerning the basic reasons for the 
upheaval, the leadership, and the benefits and losses incurred by the 
revolt. The course will specifically treat the French Revolution, the 
revolutions of 1848, the Risorgimento, the Meiji Restoration, 
overthrow of the Ching Dynasty, Jose Rizal and the Philippines, the 
Irish problem, Kenyatta and the Mau Mau and other revolutions. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 680. Readings in American Government. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 681. Readings in American Political 
Thought. (5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 683. Readings in Political Theory. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 684. Readings in Comparative Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 690/691. Independent Study. (Credit 
varies). ASC and SSC. 

Admission by approval of the instructor and the Departmental 
Coordinator. 



91 



MATHEMATICS 

FACULTY 

Mr. J. B. Clemmons, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Richard M. 
Summerville, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Chi, (ASC); Dr. 
Engelhardt, (SSC); Dr. Etersque, (ASC); Dr. Hansen, (ASC); Dr. 
Hinkel, (ASC); Dr. Houston, (SSC); Dr. A. Hudson, (ASC); Dr. S. 
Hudson, (SSC); Dr. Kilhefner, (ASC); Dr. Laska, (ASC); Dr. Munson, 
(ASC); Dr. Netherton, (ASC); and Dr. Shipley, (ASC). 



Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Mathematics 



Coordinator — 1977, Dr. Richard Summerville 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Mathematics of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program, in cooperation with the Department of Education, offers a 
program of study leading to the degree of Master of Education. The 
objectives of this program are : 

l.To enhance the academic and professional competence of 
mathematics teachers in secondary schools — at both the junior 
and senior high school levels; 

2. To develop the skills, confidence, and understanding that such 
teachers need in order to meet the present scientific and 
technological challenges of modern society; 

3. To acquaint secondary mathematics teachers with the various 
major branches of mathematics which are active in contem- 
porary research and relevant to the various modern secondary 
mathematics curricula; and 

4. To familiarize teachers of mathematics with those persons who 
have contributed significantly to the field, as well as with 
prominent mathematicians and educators currently working in 
the area of improving the teaching and understanding of the 
subject. 

In addition to its own degree program, the department also offers 
coursework designed to support the other graduate degree programs 
of the Joint Graduate Studies Program and to meet the needs of all 
graduate students in the areas of mathematics, mathematical physics, 
mathematics education, statistics, and computer science. 

92 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 
AND PLACEMENT 

Students entering the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics must 
satisfy the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program, including the requirements related to either the 
"common" part of the National Teachers Examination (NTE) or the 
"aptitude" part of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). In 
addition, the mathematics "area" part of the NTE must be taken 
prior to admission as a degree-seeking student. Students must make a 
scaled score of 600 on this "area" test for Regular Admission; no 
minimum score is required for Conditional Admission. 

Subsequent to his admission, but prior to enrolling in his first 
mathematics course (which, ordinarily, is Mathematics 501), each 
student must take the Graduate Mathematics Diagnostic Test 
(GMDT). The GMDT has the purpose of allowing some students to 
exempt Mathematics 501 upon scoring at a very high level. However, 
if a sufficiently low score is made on the GMDT, the student is not 
allowed to take Mathematics 501 until he meets requirements set for 
him by the Examinations Committee of the Joint Graduate 
Mathematics Faculty. These requirements normally consist of satis- 
factory performance in appropriate undergraduate course(s) and/or 
on subsequent re-examination. The GMDT is not required of 
students in order to take Mathematics/Education 592 or Mathe- 
matics 594. 

Each entering student should contact the Mathematics Coordi 
nator of the Joint Graduate Studies Program as early as possible for 
details concerning the GMDT and should arrange with the Coordi- 
nator to take the GMDT at its first administration after his admission 
to the program. Failure to do so can result in severely retarding the 
student's academic progress. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the M.Ed, degree program in 
mathematics, each student will be assigned both an academic adviser 
and a professional adviser. The former will be a member of the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics Faculty, and the latter a member of the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. As soon as he is notified of this 
assignment, the student should arrange for a conference with each of 
his advisers and begin planning his entire degree program under their 
guidance. A copy of the student's proposed program is to be placed 
on file in each of the Graduate Dean's offices. The student will find 
that his advisers can provide him with the kind of counsel and 



93 



information which will make possible realistic planning, informed 
and personalized judgments, and, hence, a maximally valuable 
graduate education. Each student should feel free to consult with his 
advisers as often as is necessary and should plan to have at least one 
conference per quarter with each. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

All student requests for transfer of graduate mathematics credit 
will be evaluated by the Transfer Credit Committee of the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics Faculty. A formal student request should 
include a list of the courses to be considered, a list of the texts used 
for each course, and a catalogue containing a description of each 
course. 

In reaching a decision the committee will adhere to the philosophy 
that the transfer of graduate credit is a privilege to be granted only 
when there is no doubt that the course under consideration is 
comparable in quality and content to one in the Joint Mathematics 
Graduate Program. To properly determine these factors, the commit- 
tee may at its option (a) request a personal interview with the 
student to discuss course content and/or (b) require a written 
examination to test the student's mastery of this content. 

Transfer credit is also subject to the following regulations: 

1. Each course must have been taken in an accredited graduate 
program. 

2. Each course grade must be B or better. 

3. Each credit must have been earned within the past five years. 

4. A maximum of ten (10) quarter hours of transfer credit in 
mathematics may be applied to a degree. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete a sequence of courses which conforms to the 
following requirements: 

I. Education Courses (20 quarter hours): To include Education 631, either 
Education 621 or 622, Education 671 and Education 641. 

II. Mathematics Courses (35 quarter hours): To include Mathematics 501, 502, 
505, 510, 530, and 10 quarter hours of approved courses chosen from the 
following courses: Mathematics 605, 610, 615, 620, 630, 635, 640, 655, 
660, 670, 691, and 692. It is strongly recommended that 501, 502, 505, 
510 and 530 be completed before taking other courses. 



94 



III. Elective Courses (5 quarter hours): To be taken in Mathematics, Education 
or a suitable third field with the prior approval of the student's advisers. 
(Since a course in exceptional children is required for certification, students 
should take EXC 522 if they have not had an appropriate course 
previously.) 

IV. Balance of Courses. Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement 
by taking one-half of their courses at each College. A guide to the location 
of the mathematics courses follows: 



Savannah State College 



Armstrong State College 



MATH 501 
MATH 505 
MATH 594 
MATH 605 
MATH 635 



MATH 640 
MATH 655 
MATH 670 
MATH 691 



MATH 502 
MATH 510 
MATH 530 
MATH 592 
MATH 610 



MATH 615 
MATH 620 
MATH 630 
MATH 660 
MATH 692 



A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the Education 
Department of this Bulletin. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Certain courses in the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics are 
designated as "core" courses because they contain many of the 
concepts most basic and useful to a teacher in junior or senior high 
school. The core courses are Mathematics 501, 502, 505, 510, and 
530. 

An integral part of the graduate program is the attainment of the 
kind of comprehensive understanding of these concepts which can be 
achieved by their re-examination in the light of experience and 
insight obtained from the completion of the courses in the program. 
The mathematics graduate faculty also considers that the 
crystallization of knowledge to be gained from remastering funda- 
mental topics with the benefit of a broadened viewpoint is of great 
value . 

Accordingly, each recipient of the Master of Education degree in 
Mathematics is required to have successfully demonstrated the 
attainment of such knowledge and such understanding on a written 
comprehensive examination. The following regulations govern the 
administration of the comprehensive examination in mathematics. 

1. Comprehensive Examinations will be held during the Fall and 
Spring Quarters, on the third Monday of November and April, 
respectively. The Coordinator shall notify the students and the 
Deans for Graduate Studies, at least ten days prior to the 
examination, concerning the place and time of day of the 
examination. 



95 



2. Students must register with the Mathematics Coordinator 
stating their intention to take the Comprehensive Examination. 
The deadline for registering for the Comprehensive Examination 
is two months before the date of the Examination. The 
registering students will receive within one week of this deadline 
the list of topics for which they will be responsible on the 
examination. 

3. The Examinations Committee of the Joint Graduate Mathe- 
matics Faculty will be responsible for constructing exams, 
administering them, grading them, and making recommen- 
dations to the Joint Graduate Mathematics Faculty concerning 
success or failure on the examinations. The Joint Graduate 
Mathematics faculty shall make the final decision on success or 
failure. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within seven days after the 
examination. 

4. The Mathematics Coordinator will notify the examined students 
on the results of the Comprehensive Exams. The examined 
students may request a conference with their faculty advisers 
for the purpose of discussing and reviewing the examination 
papers. The examination papers will remain in the advisement 
files of the student advisers until the end of the subsequent 
quarter. 

5. Students may repeat the Comprehensive Examination as many 
times as they find necessary to demonstrate the required level 
of competence. 

Graduate Courses in Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS 501. Calculus for Graduate Students. (5-0-5). 
SSC. Prerequisite: Students must pass the Graduate Mathematics 
Diagnostic Test prior to enrolling. 

A review of the fundamental concepts and applications of analytic 
geometry and the differential and integral calculus of one and several 
variables. (May be exempted by examination.) 

MATHEMATICS 502. Foundations of Mathematics. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 501. 

An intensive examination of the fundamental ideas of modern 
axiomatic mathematics. Special attention is given to elementary 
logic, sets, relations, functions, and a systematic construction of the 
real number system. 



96 



MATHEMATICS 505. Analysis I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. SSC. 

A careful re-examination of the elements of differential and 
integral calculus; limits, continuity, the derivative, implicit functions, 
inverse functions, the indefinite and definite integral, the funda- 
mental theorem of calculus; applications in science and technology. 

MATHEMATICS 510. Algebra I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. ASC. 

A brief survey of abstract and linear algebra, including topics from 
group theory, vector spaces and matrices. 

MATHEMATICS 530. Geometry I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. ASC. 

A transformation approach to the study of Euclidean, hyperbolic 
and elliptic geometry; together with its application in secondary 
school curriculum. 

MATHEMATICS/EDUCATION 592. Modern Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. (Does not require the GMDT.) 

Content concentration emphasizing the rigor, mathematical 
language, and subject matter to be taught in the elementary school. 

MATHEMATICS 594. Statistics for Education and the Social 
Sciences. (5-0-5). SSC. (Does not require the GMDT.) 

Graphic representation and data reduction; measures of central 
tendency and variability; distributions; correlation; regression; 
hypothesis testing. Primary emphasis is upon the development of 
statistical skills necessary for the conduct and interpretation of 
statistical research. 

MATHEMATICS 605. Analysis II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 505. SSC. 

A continuation of Analysis I; Taylor's theorem, infinite series, 
power series, improper integrals, multiple integrals; applications in 
science and technology. 

MATHEMATICS 610. Algebra II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 510. ASC. 

A continuation of Algebra I with topics from groups, rings, and 
fields. 

MATHEMATICS 615. Number Theory. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 502. ASC. 

Topics from number theory including divisibility, congruences, 
Diophantine problems, number-theoretic functions, classical con- 
struction problems. 



97 



MATHEMATICS 620. Probability and Mathematical Statistics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 505. ASC. 

The basic concepts of probability and statistics. Random exper- 
iment, event space, probability, random variable, conditional proba- 
bility, independence, basic distributions, limit theorems, sampling, 
estimation, tests of hypotheses. 

MATHEMATICS 630. Geometry II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 530. ASC. 

A continuation of Geometry I including a study of similarities 
leading to some classical theorems of geometry. 

MATHEMATICS 635. Topology. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 502. SSC. 

The basic concepts of topology; topological spaces, continuous 
functions, homeomorphisms, quotients, products, connectedness, 
compactness, separation axioms, metrizability. 

MATHEMATICS 640. Applied Analysis and Mathematical Physics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 505. SSC. 

Formulation of equations from scientific and technological prin- 
ciples and the solution of these equations. Problems will be chosen 
from the physical and biological sciences, from engineering and from 
business and economics. 

MATHEMATICS 655. Computer Science and Numerical Methods. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

Topics in computer science and numerical methods, to include 
various applications of computing in mathematics and data proc- 
essing. 

MATHEMATICS 660. Mathematical Logic. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 502. ASC. 

Topics include symbolization of sentences, and the proposition^ 
and first order predicate calculi (including the completeness theo- 
rems). If time permits, cardinal and ordinal numbers will be 
discussed. 

MATHEMATICS 670. History and Philosophy of Mathematics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

A survey of the development of mathematics and a study of 
formalism, intuitionism, and logicism. 

MATHEMATICS 691. Topics in Mathematics for the Junior High 
School I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

A detailed examination of the content of various modern 
programs in mathematics for the junior high school. Special attention 
is given to a development of the theoretical foundations underlying 
such content and to the relevance of the content in other areas of a 
student's education. 



98 



MATHEMATICS 692. Topics in Mathematics for the Junior High 
School II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 691. ASC. 

A survey of topics from finite mathematics including combina- 
tions, permutations, probability and statistics. The computer will be 
used as a tool for solving problems in these areas. 

MATHEMATICS 698. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours). ASC. 
Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: consent of the instruc- 
tor and permission of the department head. SSC. 

Individual reading and research under the direction of a member 
of the graduate mathematics faulty. The topics will consist of 
material not normally covered in the regular course offerings. 

MATHEMATICS 699. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours). SSC. Offered 
by special arrangement. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and 
permission of the department head. SSC. 

Individual reading and research under the direction of a member 
of the graduate mathematics faculty. The topics will consist of 
material not normally covered in the regular course offerings. 



99 



INDEX 

Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Standing 29 

Adding Courses 29 

Administrative Officers 8 

Admissions, General Requirements 20 

Procedures 23 

Types of 21 

Advisement 25 

Balance of Courses 32 

Biology, Graduate Courses in 51 

M.Ed. Degree in 49 

Board of Regents, Members of 6 

Staff of 6 

Business Administration, Graduate Courses in 41 

Master's Degree in 36 

Business Education, Graduate Courses in 47 

M.Ed. Degree in 43 

Candidacy for Degree 32 

CATES Courses 30 

Chemistry, Graduate Courses in 58 

M.Ed. Degree in 56 

Class Regulations 27 

Comprehensive Examination, Requirement for Degree 33 

Course Load 29 

Degree Requirements, Summary 33 

Degrees Offered 31 

Dropping Courses 29 

Education, Graduate Courses in 67 

Programs in 60 

Elementary Education, M.Ed. Degree in 60 

English, Graduate Courses in 77 

M.Ed. Degree in 74 

Exceptional Children, Degree Program in 65 

Graduate Courses in 72 

Faculty 10 

Fees 17 

Financial Assistance 19 



100 



Grades 27 

Graduate Council 9 

Graduate Courses, Identification of 27 

Graduate Departments, Heads of 8 

Graduate Program Coordinators 35 

Graduation, Application for 33 

History, Graduate Courses in 83 

M.Ed. Degree in 78 

History of Joint Graduate Studies Program 15 

Housing 19 

Joint Graduate Studies Program, 

Administration of 16 

History of 15 

Organization of 16 

Purpose of 15 

Mathematics, Graduate Courses in 96 

M.Ed. Degree in 92 

Political Science, Graduate Courses in 87 

M.Ed. Degree in 78 

Probation 29 

Program of Study Advisement Form 26 

Readmission 23 

Refunds of Fees 18 

Registration 26 

Requirements for Master's Degree, General 31 

Residence Requirements for Degree 31 

Residency Requirements Georgia 17 

Special Admission Advisement Form 25 

Special Education, Graduate Courses in . 72 

M.Ed. Degree in . 65 

Student Responsibilities . 25 

Teacher Certification . 33 

Time Limitation, Degree Programs . 31 

Transfer of Credit . 26 

Veterans Benefits 19 

Withdrawal from Classes 29 



101 



GRADUATE STUDIES 




A 

ssc 
c 



Catalogue and General Bulletin 
Joint Graduate Studies Program 
WANNAH STATE COLLEGE and ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 
1977-1978 



CONTENTS 



Academic Calendar 4 

Governing Board and Staff of the 

University System of Georgia 6 

Administrative Officers of the 

Joint Graduate Studies Program 8 

Heads of the Graduate Departments 8 

The Graduate Council 9 

The Graduate Faculty 10 

History, Purpose, and Organization 15 

Fees, Refunds and Financial Assistance 17 

Admission to Graduate Study 20 

Academic Regulations 25 

Degrees and General Degree Requirements 31 

Departments: Programs and Courses 35 

Business Administration 36 

M.B.A. Program 

M.Ed., Business Education 

Biology 48 

M.Ed., Biology 

Chemistry 54 

M.Ed., Chemistry 

Education 58 

M.Ed., Elementary Education 

M.Ed., Early Childhood Education 

M.Ed., Special Education — Behavior Disorders 

English 72 

M.Ed., English 

History and Political Science 76 

M.Ed., History 
M.Ed., Political Science 

Mathematics 88 

M.Ed., Mathematics 

Index 96 



1977 


JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 








MARCH 










APRIL 




S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 




1 




12 3 4 


5 






1 2 3 


4 


5 








1 2 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


27 


28 




27 


28 


29 30 31 






24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 


30 31 




























MAY 






JUNE 








JULY 










AUGUST 




S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 




1 2 3 


4 








1 


2 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


29 30 31 




26 


27 28 29 30 




24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 31 




SEPEMBER 






OCTOBER 






NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 


3 






1 






1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 




23 
30 


24 25 26 27 28 
31 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 






25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 31 



1978 


JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 








MARCH 










APRIL 




S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 




1 2 3 


4 






1 2 


3 


4 








1 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 8 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


29 30 31 




26 


27 28 




26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


28 29 


MAY 






JUNE 








JULY 










AUGUST 




S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


12 3 4 5 


6 




1 2 


3 










1 






1 2 3 


4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 26 


28 29 30 31 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 31 




SEPTEMBER 






OCTOBER 






NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 


2 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


7 






1 2 


3 


4 








1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 


29 


30 31 




26 


27 


28 29 30 






24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1977-1978 



JUNE 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1977 



13 Registration — Monday. 

15 Classes begin — Wednesday. 

17 Last day to register for credit- 



Friday. 



JULY 



4 Holiday — Monday. 

15 Mid-term — Friday. 

15 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

TBA Preregistration for the Fall Quarter. 



AUGUST 12 Last day of classes— Friday. 

15-17 Examinations — Monday-Wednesday. 
17 Graduation. 



FALL QUARTER, 1977 

SEPTEMBER 19 Registration— Monday. 

22 Classes begin — Thursday. 

23 Last day to register for credit — Friday. 



OCTOBER 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



25 Mid-term — Tuesday. 

25 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

TBA Preregistration for Winter Quarter. 

24-25 Thanksgiving Holidays (begins at 12:30 P.M. on 
November 23). 

1 Last day of classes — Thursday. 

5-7 Examinations — Monday- Wednesday. 

8 Christmas Vacation begins — Thursday. 






WINTER QUARTER, 1978 

JANUARY 2 Registration— Monday. 

4 Classes begin — Wednesday. 

6 Last day to register for credit — Friday. 



FEBRUARY 3 Mid-term— Friday. 

3 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
13 Last day to file application for graduation at end 
of Spring Quarter — Monday. 
TBA Preregistration for Spring Quarter. 









MARCH 14 Last day of classes— Tuesday. 

15-17 Examinations — Friday. 
20-23 Spring recess — Monday-Thursday. 



MARCH 



SPRING QUARTER, 1978 

23 Registration — Thursday. 
27 Classes begin — Monday. 
30 Last day to register for credit — Thursday. 



APRIL 



28 Last day to file applicatin for graduation at end 
of Summer Quarter — Friday. 



MAY 



1 Mid-term — Monday. 

1 Last day to withdraw from class from grade of W. 
TBA Preregistration for Summer Quarter. 



JUNE 



2 Last day of classes — Friday. 
5-7 Examinations — Monday- Wednesday. 
7 Graduation — with ASC — Wednesday. 



JUNE 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1978 



12 Registration — Tuesday. 

13 Classes begin — Wednesday. 

17 Last day to register for credit- 



-Friday. 



JULY 



4 Holiday — Monday. 

13 Mid-term— Friday. 

13 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

TBA Preregistration for the Fall Quarter. 



AUGUST 10 Last day of classes— Thursday. 

14-16 Examinations — Monday- Wednesday. 
13 Graduation — with SSC — Sunday. 



FALL QUARTER, 1978 

SEPTEMBER 18 Registration— Monday. 

20 Classes begin — Wednesday. 

26 Last day to register for credit — Tuesday. 

OCTOBER 31 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

31 Mid-term — Tuesday. 

NOVEMBER 24-25 Thanksgiving Holidays (begin at 12:30 P.M. 
on November 23). 
30 Last day of classes — Thursday. 



DECEMBER 4-7 Examinations— Monday-Thursday. 

11 Christmas Vacation begins — Monday. 



GOVERNING BOARD, 
ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES T. OXFORD, Chairman Albany 

MILTON JONES, Vice Chairman Columbus 

SCOTT CANDLER, JR Decatur 

RUFUS B. COODY Vienna 

ERWIN A. FRIEDMAN Savannah 

CHARLES A. HARRIS Ocilla 

JESSE HILL, JR Atlanta 

0. TORBITT IVEY, JR Augusta 

JAMES D. MADDOX Rome 

ELRIDGE W. MCMILLAN Atlanta 

LAMAR R. PLUNKETT Bowdon 

JOHN H. ROBINSON, III Americus 

P. R. SMITH Winder 

DAVID H. TISINGER Carrollton 

SAM A. WAY, III Hawkinsville 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 

STAFF OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR Chancellor 

JOHN W. HOOPER Vice Chancellor 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretary 

SHEALY E. McCOY Vice Chancellor-Fiscal 

Affairs and Treasurer 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Vice Chancellor-Construction 

and Physical Plant 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor-Research 

M. COY WILLIAMS Vice Chancellor 

Academic Development 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR Vice Chancellor-Services 

HARRY B. O'REAR Vice Chancellor-Health Affairs 

HASKIN R. POUNDS Assistant Vice Chancellor 

JAMES L. CARMON Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Computing Systems 

MARY ANN HICKMAN Assistant Vice Chancellor-Personnel 

ROBERT M. JOINER Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Communications 

HARRY H. MURPHY, JR Director of Public Information 

L. HARLAN DAVIS Director, Intennstitutional Programs 

in International Affairs 

6 




* * 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF 
THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

President 
Prince A. Jackson, Jr. Henry L. Ashmore 

Vice President 
Clyde Hall H. Dean Propst 

Dean for Graduate Studies 
James A. Eaton Joseph V. Adams 

Comptroller 
Prince Mitchell Jule R. Stanfield 

Registrar 
John B. Clemmons George Hunnicutt 

Librarian 
Andrew J. McLemore Gerald Sandy 

HEADS OF THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENTS 

Biology 
Margaret C. Robinson Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. 

Business Administration 
Mary C. Torian Thomas R. Eason 

Chemistry 
Willie G. Tucker Henry E. Harris 

Education 
Thelma M. Harmond William W. Stokes 

English 

Luetta C. Milledge Hugh Pendexter, III 

Mathematics 

John B. Clemmons Richard M. Summerville 

History and Political Science 
Isaiah Mclver Roger K. Warlick 



THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

The members of the Graduate Council include, in addition to the 
Presidents, Deans, Librarians and Heads of Graduate Departments 
named above, the graduate faculty members and graduate students listed 
below: 

1976-1977 

Sarvan Bahtia, representing the Business Administration faculty. 

K. G. Nambiar, representing the Biology faculty. 

Paul Robbins, representing the Chemistry faculty. 

Frankie Ellis, representing the Education faculty. 

Robert I. Strozier, representing the English faculty. 

Steven Smith, representing the History and Political Science faculty. 

Richard Munson, representing the Mathematics faculty. 

Student. 

Student. 



1977-1978 

representing the Business Administration 

faculty, 
representing the Biology faculty, 
representing the Chemistry faculty, 
representing the Education faculty, 
representing the English faculty, 
representing the History and Political Science 

faculty, 
representing the Mathematics faculty. 
Student. 
Student. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 
OLA VI ARENS, Ph.D., Columbia University, History (ASC) 
JOHN C. ADAMS, Ed.D., Florida State University, Education (SSC) 
JOSEPH V. ADAMS, Ph.D., University of Alabama, Psychology (ASC) 

STEPHEN AGYEKUM, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 

(SSC) 

EDWARD ALBAN, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Business Administ- 
ration (ASC) 

HAYWARD ANDERSON, D.B.A., Harvard University, Business Ad- 
ministration (SSC) 

ADELINE Z. BARBER, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 

(ASC) 

JIMMY B. BENSON, Ph.D., Cornell University, Biology (SSC) 

RONALD J. BEUMER, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Biology (ASC) 

SARVAN K. BHATIA, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Business Ad- 
ministration (ASC) 

NANCY V. BLAND, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

BLANTON BLACK, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Political Science 

(SSC) 

JOHN BREWER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Chemistry (ASC) 

KENT BROOKS, Ph.D., Georgia Washington University, English 

(ASC) 

CLIFFORD BURGESS, Ph.D., Auburn University, Education (SSC) 

THOMAS H. BYERS, Ph.D., Ball State University, Political Science 

(SSC) 

0. CARVER BYRD, Ph.D., Georgia State University, Business Ad- 
ministration (SSC) 

C. .P. G. CHI, Ph.D., Wayne State University, Mathematics (ASC) 

ROSS L. CLARK, Ph.D., Tulane University, Political Science (ASC) 

JOHN H. COCHRAN, JR., Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 
(SSC) 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, Ph.D., Florida State University, Political 

Science (ASC) 

OSCAR C. DAUB, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 



10 



LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Biology 

(ASC) 

ELMER J. DEAN, Ed.D., Columbia University, History and Political 
Science (SSC) 

JOHN DUNCAN, Ph.D., Emory University, History (ASC) 

THOMAS R. EASON, Ph.D., University of Mississippi, Business Admin- 
istration (ASC) 

JAMES A. EATON, Ed.D., Columbia University, Education (SSC) 

FRANKIE ELLIS, Ed.D., University of Texas, Education (SSC) 

C. OBI EMEH, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Biology (SSC) 

JACOB ENGELHARDT, Ph.D., New York University, Mathematics 

(SSC) 

STANLEY ETERSQUE, Ed.D., West Virginia University, Mathemat- 
ics (ASC) 

IDA J. GADSDEN, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Education 
(SSC) 

JIMMIE F. GROSS, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (ASC) 

LAURENT J. GUILLOU, JR., Ph.D., Louisiana State University, Biol- 
ogy (ASC) 

ORANGE HALL, Ph.D., University of Florida, Business Administra- 
tion (ASC) 

THELMA M. HARMOND, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Education 
(SSC) 

JOHN R. HANSEN, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Mathematics (ASC) 

HENRYE. HARRIS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, Chemistry 
(ASC) 

LAWRENCE HARRIS, Ph.D., University Santo Tomas, Manila, His- 
tory and Political Science (SSC) 

JERALINE HARVEN, Ed.D., Indiana University, Business Education 
(SSC) 

JOHN S. HINKEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Mathematics 

(ASC) 

JOHN HOUSTON, Ph.D., Purdue University, Mathematics (SSC) 
ANNE L. HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University, Mathematics (ASC) 
SIGMUND HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University, Mathematics (SSC) 



11 



FRISSELR. HUNTER, Ph.D., State University of Iowa, Biology (SSC) 

JEFFREY JAMES, Ph.D., Howard University, Chemistry (SSC) 

JAMES LAND JONES, Ph.D., Tulane University, English (ASC) 

DALE Z. KILHEFNER, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, Mathe- 
matics (ASC) 

JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, Ph.D., Columbia University, English (ASC) 

PULLABHOTIA V. KRISHNAMURTI, Ph.D., Texas A. and M. Uni- 
versity. Biology (SSC) 

MICHAEL A. LABURTIS, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Business 

Administration (ASC) 

MARY LOU LAMB. Ed.D., Indiana University, Business Education 
(ASC) 

JOSEPH LANE, Ph.D., University of Georgia. Psychology (ASC) 

CORNELIA V. LAWSON, Ed.D.. University of Arkansas, Education 
(SSC) 

MARGARET LAWSON. Ph.D.. University of North Carolina, English 
(ASC) 

CHARLES LASKA, Ph.D., Syracuse University, Mathematics (ASC) 

ELIZABETH LUNZ, Ph.D., Tulane University, English (SSC) 

ISAIAH McIVER, Ph.D., Loyola University, History (SSC) 

WILLIAM D. MCCARTHY, Ph.D.. University of Georgia, Business Ad- 
ministration (ASC) 

MICHAEL K. MAHER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

JOHN C. MCCARTHY, Ph.D.. University of Georgia, Political Science 
(ASC) 

MANCHERY P. MENON, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Chemistry 
(SSC) 

LUETTA C. MILLEDGE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

RICHARD E. MUNSON. Ph.D., Rutgers University. Mathematics 
(ASC) 

K. G. NAMBIAR, Ph.D., Texas A. & M. University, Biology (SSC) 

JAMES S. NETHERTON, Ph.D., University of Virginia. Mathematics 
(ASC) 



12 



S. LLOYD NEWBERRY, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 

(ASC) 

JOHN F. NEWMAN, Ph.D., University of Florida, Political Science 
(ASC) 

HERBERT O'KEEFE, Ph.D., Georgia State University, Accounting 
(SSC) 

GEORGE 0. O'NEILL, Ph.D., University of Southern California, En- 
glish (SSC) 

ROBERT M. PATTERSON, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, History 

(ASC) 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, English 
(ASC) 

ALLEN L. PINGEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Biology 

(ASC) 

H. DEAN PROPST, Ph.D., Peabody College, English (ASC) 

KAMALAKAR RAUT, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Chemistry 
(SSC) 

STEVE YOUNGRHEE, Ph.D., University of Missouri, Political Science 

(ASC) 

EMORY H. RICHARDS, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Business Ad- 
ministration (ASC) 

PAUL E. ROBBINS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, Chemistry 
(ASC) 

A. DORIS ROBINSON, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Education 
(SSC) 

MARGARET C. ROBINSON, Ph.D., Washington University, Biology 

(SSC) 

HERMAN SARTOR, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Education (SSC) 

CHARLES T. SHIPLEY, Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Mathematics 

(ASC) 

JOHN E. SIMPSON, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (SSC) 

HARPAL SINGH, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Biology (SSC) 

R. B. SINGH, Ph.D., Patna University, Business Administration (SSC) 

STEVEN SMITH, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, History (SSC) 

JACQUELYN STEPHENS, Ed.D., Oklahoma University, Education 
(SSC) 



13 



ROBERT L. STEVENSON, Ph.D., University of Indiana, English 

(SSC) 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, Ed.D., University of Florida, Education ( AS C) 

CEDRIC STRATTON, Ph.D., Birbeck College, London, England, 
Chemistry (ASC) 

ROBERT I. STROZIER, Ph.D., Florida State University, English 

(ASC) 

RICHARD SUMMERVILLE, Ph.D., Syracuse University, Mathemat- 
ics (ASC) 

JOSEPH W. SUMNER, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Educa- 
tion (SSC) 

CLAUDIA THOMAS, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Biology (ASC) 

MARY C. TORIAN, Ed.D., New York University, Business Administ- 
ration (SSC) 

WILLIE G. TUCKER, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Chemistry 

(SSC) 

HANES WALTON, Ph.D., Howard University, History (SSC) 
PAUL E. WARD, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 
ROGER K. WARLICK, Ph.D., Boston University, History (ASC) 
E. K. WILLIAMS, Ph.D., New York University, History (SSC) 

BERNARD L. WOODHOUSE, Ph.D., Howard University, Biology 

(SSC) 






14 



HISTORY, PURPOSE 
AND ORGANIZATION 



HISTORY 

Graduate Studies in Savannah were initiated at the beginning of the 
summer quarter 1968, when Savannah State College, with the approval 
of the Board of Regents, began offering courses leading to the degree of 
Master of Science in Elementary Education. The program operated as an 
independent program for thirteen quarters, enrolling well over two 
hundred students. It was approved by both the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and the Georgia State Board of Education. 
Seventy-five persons received master's degrees under this program. 

Beginning with the fall quarter of 1971, Savannah State College joined 
with Armstrong State College to offer a joint program of graduate work. 
The combined faculties, library holdings, and facilities of the two colleges 
made possible the expansion of the graduate program to include a 
master's degree in business administration as well as the program in 
elementary education. In the spring of 1972, the Board of Regents 
approved the addition of secondary options in the Master of Education 
program. The Joint Graduate Studies Program has been fully accredited 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, with its degree 
programs in Education approved by the Georgia State Department of 
Education. 

PURPOSE 

The philosophical base of the Joint Graduate Studies Program is an 
affirmation of the dignity and worth of the individual. Implicit in this 
philosophy is a realization that modern man must be productive, articu- 
late, and proactive. The Program is dedicated to service through: 
educational programs, community involvement, faculty and student 
research, scholarship and creativity. By offering advanced preparation to 
those who professionally serve the public schools, the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program contributes to the development of teachers who possess 
the qualities of character, commitment, and professional promise, and 
through these teachers, to the children they serve. By offering advanced 
professional training in management and administration, the Program 
serves individuals for positions of responsibility in business, industry, 
government and education. 



15 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Joint Graduate Studies Program is designed to insure the equal 
involvement of the two Colleges in the administration of the program and 
the instruction offered within the program. Students are required to take 
one-half of the courses in their degree programs at Savannah State 
College and one-half of the courses at Armstrong State College. The 
graduate degrees, bearing the signatures of both Presidents, are 
awarded jointly by the two Colleges. The location of the graduation 
ceremonies alternates between the two Colleges. 

The policy-making body for the Joint Graduate Studies Program is the 
Graduate Council. The Graduate Council consists of: the Deans of 
Graduate Studies of the two Colleges; the Department (or Division) 
Heads of those departments (or divisions) of the two Colleges which offer 
graduate programs; one graduate faculty member for each combined 
department (or division) of the two colleges offering a graduate program, 
this member being elected by the combined graduate faculty of the 
departments (divisions) concerned; and two graduate students selected 
by the Graduate Deans. The Vice Presidents and the Presidents of the 
two colleges hold ex officio memberships on the Council. 

Programs are developed by the joint departmental faculties and 
approved by the Graduate Council for recommendation to the Presidents. 
The curriculum, the appointment of graduate faculty, the various 
academic policies (including policies on admissions, course credits, degree 
requirements, etc.) are acted on by the Graduate Council for recommen- 
dation to the Presidents. The combined resources of the academic 
departments and libraries and the campus facilities of the two Colleges 
are utilized in support of the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

Administrative operations of the program are the responsibility of the 
two Graduate Deans and of the Department or Division Heads on the two 
campuses. Each of the Graduate Deans serve a two-year term, on an 
alternating basis, as the Coordinating Dean for Graduate Studies. The 
Heads of Departments or Divisions alternate on a yearly basis as 
Departmental Coordinators. The various administrative officers of the 
two Colleges give further support to the program. 



16 



FEES, REFUNDS, & 
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



ALL FEES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE END OF ANY 
QUARTER. 

APPLICATION FEE 

An application fee of $10.00 is paid by each graduate student at the 
time of initial application for admission. This fee is not required of 
graduates from either Armstrong State College or Savannah State 
College. The acceptance of the application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student into the graduate program. This fee, which is 
paid at Armstrong State College, is not refundable. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

The matriculation fee for part-time students is $12.00 per quarter hour; 
thus, the matriculation fee for one five (5) hour course is $60.00. Students 
carrying 12 credit hours or more will pay $145.00. 

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION 

Non-residents of Georgia carrying 12 credit hours or more must pay a 
fee of $238.00 per quarter in addition to all regular fees. Students 
carrying less than 12 credit hours in a quarter who are not legal residents 
of the State of Georgia will pay at the rate of $20.00 per quarter hour for 
out-of-state tuition, in addition to matriculation fees. For residency 
requirements as established by the Board of Regents, see the Bulletin 
and General Catalogue of either Savannah State College or Armstrong 
State College. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE 

All students enrolled for six quarter hours or more must pay an 
Activity Fee of $15.00 per quarter. 

ATHLETIC FEE 

All students must pay an Athletic Fee of $8.00 per quarter. 



17 



LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students registering 
on the date listed in the catalogue as the date on which classes begin. A 
fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the date listed 
in the catalogue as the "last day to register for credit." 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE FEE 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for a change of schedule after the registration 
cards have been processed. No charge is made if the change is initiated by 
the College. 

GRADUATION FEE 

Each candidate for graduation must pay a graduation fee of $25.00 
prior to his or her graduation. This fee must be paid at Savannah State 
College. For further information, inquire at the Graduate Offices. 

REFUNDS 

Refund of the matriculation fee and of non-resident tuition will be made 
only upon written application for withdrawal from school. No refunds are 
made for simply dropping a course. Refunds must be processed by the 
College at which fees were paid. Privilege fees are not refundable. Both 
Colleges follow the refund policy of the Board of Regents as stated below: 

Students who formally withdraw on the date of scheduled regist- 
ration or during one week following the scheduled registration date 
are entitled to a refund of 80% of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who formally withdraw during the period between one and 
two weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a 
refund of 60% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
formally withdraw between two and three weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 40% of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw during 
the period between three and four weeks after the scheduled 
registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of the fees paid for 
that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of four weeks 
has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be entitled to 
no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

DORMITORY FEES AT SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Students who occupy dormitory facilities at Savannah State College 
should refer to the Savannah State general Bulletin for information on 
fees and should contact the Office of Student Affairs at Savannah State 
for assistance. 



18 






FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified 
students; these assistantships are awarded and administered by the 
individual graduate departments of the two Colleges. Students may seek 
information from the individual departments about assistantships but are 
advised to make a formal request for an assistantship only after their 
admission to the Graduate Program with Regular Admission status. 

Students are invited to contact the Offices of Financial Aids at the two 
Colleges for information on federal and state programs of financial 
assistance to college students. 

VETERANS BENEFITS 

Both campuses provide graduate students with veteran's services 
through Offices of Veterans Affairs. Information of interest to veterans 
can be obtained by writing or calling the office of Veteran Affairs at 
either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. 

Once accepted into the graduate program, the veteran should contact 
one of the offices for processing instructions. Since processing time 
varies, a first quarter student should expect a four to six week delay in 
receiving the first benefit check. First quarter student veterans should 
consider this delay when making financial arrangements to attend school. 

For purposes of G.I. Bill benefits, ten (10) quarter hours is considered 
to be a full load; a load of five (5) graduate quarter hours entitles the 
graduate student to half-time benefits. 



19 



ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDIES 



Graduate course work provides an opportunity for continuing profes- 
sional growth and competency, for expanding professional and cultural 
background, and for extending knowledge and understanding in an area 
of specialty. Qualified students may take advantage of these educational 
opportunities without necessarily seeking a degree. Admission to one of 
the degree programs of the Joint Graduate Studies Program is a serious 
academic venture; therefore, prospective students are expected to show 
evidence of high academic achievement and potential. Students who 
enroll as degree-seeking students must meet more rigorous admission 
standards than those students who do not seek a master's degree. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants desiring admission on a degree-seeking status must present 
satisfactory undergraduate academic records and satisfactory scores on 
appropriate admissions examinations. Some of the graduate degree 
programs have specialized test requirements, specified undergraduate 
course requirements or other requirements for degree-seeking students. 
Refer to the departmental programs for specific information on these 
requirements. 

General requirements for degree-seeking students include the follow- 
ing: applicants for the M.B.A. program must provide satisfactory scores 
on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT); applicants for all 
M.Ed, programs must provide satisfactory scores on either the Aptitude 
Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Common 
Examination of the National Teacher Examination (NTE). Satisfactory 
undergraduate grades must be presented by all degree-seeking students. 

Admission to some programs may require satisfactory scores on either 
the appropriate area examination of the NTE or the appropriate ad- 
vanced test of the GRE. For details of such requirements, consult the 
appropriate departmental entry in the catalogue or the Departmental 
Coordinator or the Graduate Office. 

Applications for the above examinations are usually available at the 
two Colleges and will be given to students who come to the Colleges to 
obtain them. Students who wish to write for an application form or to 
submit an application for these examinations should contact: Educational 
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540. Students should request 
that their test scores be sent to the Graduate Studies Office, Armstrong 
State College, Savannah, Georgia 31406. 



20 



TYPESOF ADMISSION 

Regular Admission 
(a degree-seeking classification) 

DEFINITION 

Regular Admission means that a student has met all admission 
requirements and is admitted to a degree program with full graduate 
status. 

REQUIREMENTS 

A student who has earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
college, who has completed all of the prerequisites for his planned 
graduate field of study, and who meets the other requirements of the 
Graduate Program may be admitted on Regular Admission status. These 
requirements include minimum undergraduate grade-point averages in 
combination with certain minimum test scores. For the M.B.A. program, 
these grade point averages range from a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 to a 
minimum of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and must be combined with minimum test 
scores on the GMAT. See the Business Administration departmental 
section of this catalogue for specific requirements. For M.Ed, programs, 
a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 is required and a minimum test score of 500 on 
the NTE Commons examination or 800 on the GRE Aptitude examina- 
tion. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the appropriate 
departmental entry. Degree programs providing teacher certification 
have other admission requirements, including: (1) a recommendation 
from the school in which a student has been employed as a teacher or has 
completed a student internship, and (2) eligibility for fourth level certifi- 
cation in the field of study. (For further information on admission to 
certification programs, consult the Graduate Office or the Education 
Departmental Coordinator. ) 



Pro vis io n a I Adm iss io )t 
(a degree-seeking classification) 

DEFINITION 

Provisional Admission means that a student has applied for admission 
to a degree program and has some condition placed on his status such as 
low grades or test scores. The student is admitted to a degree program 
but must meet certain conditions before achieving full graduate status 
(i.e., Regular Admission). 

REQUIREMENTS 

For Provisional Admission, a student must hold a baccalaureate degree 
and meet the other admission requirements of the Graduate Program. 



21 



These requirements include minimum undergraduate grade point aver- 
ages in combination with certain minimum test scores. 

For the M.B.A. program these grade point averages range from a 
minimum G.P.A. of 2.2 to a minimum of 2.7 and must be combined with 
minimum test scores on the GMAT. See the Business Administration 
departmental section of this catalogue for specific requirements. 

For the M.Ed, programs, students who fail to meet Regular Admission 
score requirements may be granted Provisional Admission if the combi- 
nations of their G.P.A. and test scores conform to the following formulas: 

GPA x 100 + NTE Common = 750 or more. 
GPA x 100 + GRE Aptitude = 1000 or more. 

In no case, however, may the G.P.A. be less than 2.2, the NTE less than 
450, or the GRE less than 700. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the appropriate 
departmental entry. 

Additional Stipulations for Provisional Admissions. 

As with Regular Admission, recommendation forms and other aspects 
of the Admissions Procedures must be adhered to. 

Provisionally admitted students may be required to remove any 
specific deficiencies that are ascertained by taking undergraduate sup- 
porting courses before the students are allowed to attempt graduate 
courses within the program to which they have been admitted. M.Ed, 
students may remain admitted on a provisional basis until they have 
attempted 15 hours of approved graduate work. If they satisfactorily 
complete the initial, approved 15 hours of graduate work with no grade 
less than a "B,"-of which 10 hours must be in the professional 
sequence — and submit the Area test score as may be required, these 
students may submit a written request, with advisor's endorsement, to 
move into Regular status. 

Upon satisfying the Area test score as may be required and upon 
completing 25 hours of approved course work with a "B" average or 
better, of which 15 hours must be in the major field of study, any 
provisionally admitted student (M.B.A. or M.Ed.) will be eligible for 
Regular status. If the student does not have a "B" average or better upon 
completing these 25 hours of course work, he or she will be dropped as a 
degree-seeking student. 



22 



Post Baccalaureate Admission 
(Nondegree status) 

Post baccalaureate admission is provided for those students who may 
not wish to pursue a graduate degree, including teachers whose main 
purpose is to obtain credits necessary for teacher certification and/or for 
students who may desire to enter a degree program but who have missing 
data. Requirements for Post Baccalaureate Admission include documen- 
tary evidence of a baccalaureate or higher degree and submission of 
necessary application papers. The student may also have to meet specific 
prerequisites to enroll in courses in certain departments. 

No more than fifteen (15) hours earned while enrolled as a Post 
Baccalaureate student may be applied toward a M.Ed, degree and no 
more than ten (10) hours toward a M.B.A. degree. 

A Post Baccalaureate student who wishes to have degree status must 
submit a written request to the Graduate Office and must meet all of the 
requirements set forth for degree-seeking students. 

TRANSIENT STUDENT 

Transient students must arrange to have written authorization sent to 
the Graduate Office from their dean, department head, or registrar at the 
graduate school in which they are enrolled in order to be accepted as a 
transient student and to register in the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 
They must also submit the application for admission form and the $10 fee 
as described in the Admission Procedures. If they wish to become 
degree-seeking students, they must request appropriate admission in 
writing and must submit the necessary documents. 

READMISSIONS 

Any student in the Joint Graduate Studies Program who did not 
matriculate (i.e., register) during the quarter immediately preceding the 
quarter in which he next intends to matriculate must process a readmis- 
sion form with the Registrar's Office. The only students exempted from 
this requirement are those students who are admitted to the Program in 
the quarter immediately preceding the quarter of their first matricula- 
tion. For further information, inquire at the Graduate Offices or Regis- 
trar's office. (Note: through Summer Quarter of 1978, the Registrar at 
Savannah State College will handle matriculations and readmissions for 
the Joint Graduate Studies Program.) 



23 



ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

The Graduate Office at Armstrong State College is the graduate admis- 
sions office. All admissions documents should be sent to this office 
for processing; the application for admission, $10 fee, and transcripts 
must reach the office 20 days prior to registration. 

The following materials and procedures are part of the requirements 
for admission to the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

1. The application-for-admission form, available in the Graduate Office 
at either College, must be completed and submitted. Required of all 
applicants. 

2. Three (3) official transcipts showing all college credits earned for the 
undergraduate degree should be sent directly from the college 
which awarded the degree to the Graduate Office at Armstrong 
State College. Required of all applicants except transient students 
who may submit letter of authorization from their graduate school. 

3. Test scores, as appropriate and required for the major, must be 
submitted. Required of degree-seeking students only. 

4. Completed recommendation forms (2) must be submitted; these 
forms are available in the two Graduate Offices. For applicants 
entering teacher certification programs, at least one (1) recommen- 
dation must be from supevisory personnel who observed the student 
in a teaching internship or as an employed teacher. These recom- 
mendations are required of degree-seeking students only. 

5. A ten dollar ($10) application fee is required of all students, except 
graduates of Savannah State College and Armstrong State College. 

All materials and documents should be submitted as soon as possible 
but at least twenty (20) days prior to the registration date of the quarter 
a student enrolls. Action can be taken on applications for admission only 
after essential materials have been received. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY DOES NOT IMPLY AU- 
TOMATIC ACCEPTANCE OF THE STUDENT AS A CANDIDATE 
FOR ANY MASTER'S DEGREE. SEE SECTION ON CANDIDACY 
FOR DEGREE. 



24 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The student is charged with the responsibility for taking the initiative 
in meeting all academic requirements and in maintaining a careful check 
on his or her progress toward earning a degree. The student is responsi- 
ble for discharging his or her obligations to the business offices and the 
libraries and for adhering to the rules and regulations appertaining to 
graduate students in particular and to all students enrolled in a unit of the 
University System of Georgia. Graduate student academic regulations 
are set forth in this bulletin; for information regarding general regula- 
tions of students using the property and facilities of Savannah State 
College or Armstrong State College, refer to the general bulletins and 
student publications of the two Colleges. It is the student's responsibility 
to abide by catalogue requirements. A student's claim that he or she has 
been granted an exception to these requirements must be documented 
before the merits of the claim can be evaluated. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, the student will be referred 
to a Departmental or Program Coordinator for adviser assignment. 
Consultation with the assigned adviser is required prior to registration. 
Each student must process appropriate advisement papers which are 
available from his or her assigned adviser and which provide the adviser 
clearance required for registration. 

Transient students report to the Graduate Office for advisement and 
adviser clearance. 

Post Baccalaureate students obtain adviser clearance by processing the 
Special advisement form with their assigned advisers. During the quarter 
in which a Special Admissions student achieves degree-seeking status, he 
or she must process the program of Study form. 

Degree-seeking students, both Regular and Provisional Admissions 
students, must process the Program of Study form with their assigned 
advisor no later than the end of their first quarter of enrollment. A 
temporary adviser clearance statement may be provided by the adviser 
which will be valid only for the student's initial registration. This 
temporary clearance should be processed on a special advisement form, 
with appropriate notations made to indicate that it is temporary. 

The Program of Study shows the courses the student will take in his or 
her degree program, transfer courses that )night apply to the degree, and 



25 



prerequisite courses or other prerequisites. The Program of Study must 
be followed by the student in fulfilling degree requirements. However, 
the student can take courses additional to those on his Program of Study, 
and he may enroll in the courses on his Program of Study during quarters 
other than those which might be shown on his Program of Study form. 
Moreover, the student may officially modify his Program of Study with 
the concurrence of his adviser and other appropriate personnel by 
processing the form for Modification of Program of Study. These forms 
are available from the advisers. 

Students should note that any departure from the catalogue require- 
ments for a degree must be approved by the Graduate Dean. 

FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

Specialized advisement is available for foreign students from the 
Graduate Foreign Student Adviser, Dr. Kamalakar Raut, located in room 
231, Griffin-Drew Science Hall, at Savannah State College. The mailing 
address is P.O. Box 20397, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia, 
31401. 

REGISTRATION 

Before a student may register for graduate courses in the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program he must be formally admitted as a graduate 
student (although 500 level courses may be taken by undergraduate 
students upon complying with requirements and procedures stipulated 
by and available in the Graduate Offices). If his circumstances require it, 
he must be readmitted (see section on Admissions, paragraph on Read- 
missions). Through the Summer Quarter of 1978, registration will occur 
on the Savannah State campus. 

TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDITS 

A maximum of thirty (30) hours of credit may be transferred from 
another institution, provided: 

1. that each course equates with a course in the curriculum of the Joint 
Graduate Program or is an acceptable elective. 

2. that the credit was earned in an accredited graduate program. 

3. that a grade of B or better was earned in each course. 

4. that the credit was earned within the past five years. 

5. that no more than fifty percent of the required credits shall be 
transferred for use towards a master's degree (i.e., no more than 
50% of either the required professional education credits or other 
required credits). 



26 



For additional information on the amount of credit transferable for a 
particular degree program, refer to the appropriate departmental entry. 

PROCEDURES FOR PROCESSING TRANSFER CREDITS 

Requests by students to receive transfer graduate credit must be 
supported by three (3) copies of the graduate transcript showing the 
credits requested. The formal and final request for receiving transfer 
credit is part of the application for Candidacy which the student must 
process upon the completion of 25 hours of graduate work. This applica- 
tion is obtained in the Graduate Offices. 

Advisement on transfer of credit is routinely provided on the Program 
of Study form which every degree-seeking student must complete with 
his adviser in his first quarter of enrollment. Formal approval of transfer 
credits is granted via the student's Application for Candidacy which 
requires approval by the student's adviser and Department Coordinator 
and by the Graduate Dean. 

Prospective students may write to the Department Coordinator in 
their area of study to obtain advisement on transfer of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Courses numbered 500 to 599 are open to both undergraduate and 
graduate students. In such courses, the quantity and quality of work 
required of the graduate students will be on the same level as that 
required in those courses offered exclusively for graduates. Courses 
numbered 600 to 699 will be open only to graduate students. Candidates 
for master's degrees must take at least fifty percent of their courses at 
the 600 level. 

GRADUATE CLASS REGULATIONS AND SCHEDULES 

Graduate classes are conducted in conformity with the general 
academic policies of the Board of Regents and of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program and the regulations of the Campus on which a given 
class is taught. Specific class requirements, including attendance re- 
quirements and requirements for grades are set by the instructor for each 
class. 

The two sponsoring Colleges reserve the right to cancel classes and to 
adjust class schedules. 

GRADES 

In accordance with the policies of the Board of Regents, the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program is on a 4.0 grade point system. The only 



27 



grades approved by the Board of Regents for computing the grade point 
averages of students are: A— 4, B— 3, C— 2, D— 1. F— 0, and WF 
(withdrew failing) — 0. The Board of Regents has also approved for uses 
other than for computing grade point averages, the following symbols: 
I — incomplete; W — withdrew without penalty: V — audit; K — credit for a 
course by examination; and S — satisfactory and U — unsatisfactory which 
are applicable only to theses, practicums, internships, and proficiency 
requirements. 

In the Joint Graduate Studies Program grades assigned are A, B, C, D, 

F (failure), I (incomplete), W (withdrew with no penalty), and WF 
(withdrew failing). The grade of W does not enter into computing a 
student's grade point average. 

Stipulations applicable to other symbols used in the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program include: 

I — incomplete. May be awarded by an insructor, who will also stipulate 
the conditions for its removal. Any grade of I which has not been removed 
by completing the course after three (3) quarters of matriculating in 
residence after the I was awarded shall become an automatic F; if the I 
has not been removed within one calendar year after the I was awarded, 
regardless of intervening matriculations, the I shall become an F. 

W — withdrawal without penalty. May be awarded by an instructor up to 
the mid-quarter period in a course. Regents' policy stipulates that 
"Withdrawals without penalty will not be permitted after the mid-point of 
the total grading period (including final examinations) except in cases of 
hardship as determined by the appropriate official of the respective 
institution." 



WF — withdrew failing. May be awarded by an instructor anytime that a 
student withdraws from a course after the drop/add period; mandatory 
after midquarter except for hardship cases as stipulated above for grades 
of AW 

V — audit. Use of this symbol is subject to the discretion of the individual 
joint graduate departments, and the departments may require that a 
student receive the permission of the instructor to audit a course prior to 
registering for the course. Moreover, an auditi)ig student must pay the 
usual fees, must register for the course, and may not transfer from audit 
to credit status (or vice versa). 

S and U — satisfactory and unsatisfactory: see above. Specific courses 
receiving these grades are identified in departmental course listings. 
Comprehensive examinations are given these grades also. 



28 



K — credit by examination. Use of this symbol is subject to the discretion 
of the individual joint graduate departments. 

NOTICE: Students expecting to receive grades of V or K must insure 
that they are enrolled in an appropriate course or activity for which V or 
K grades are awarded by the appropriate department. If this catalogue 
does not show in the departmental entries that the given departments 
have authorized the use of V or K, then a student expecting to receive V 
in a course should obtain written verification from the appropriate 
instructor prior to registering for the course that V will be awarded. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND STANDING 

Any student who falls below a 3.0 (B) average shall be on academic- 
probation. 

Any student who is admitted to Provisional Admission (formerly 
conditional) status and who does not achieve a 3.0 average or better upon 
completing 25 hours shall be dropped as a degree-seeking student and be 
placed on Post Baccalaureate status. Any Regular Admission student 
who has less than a 3.0 average after completing 25 or more hours shall be 
placed on "regular admission — probation status" and shall, thereafter, be 
required to achieve grades of B or better in all courses in order to 
maintain this status and must achieve a 3.0 average in order to return to 
Regular Admission status. Any student on "regular admission — 
probation status" who earns less than a B in any course or who 
accumulates 75 hours while still on this status shall be dropped as a 
degree-seeking student and shall be placed on Post Baccalaureate status. 

COURSE LOAD LIMITATION 

A full-time graduate student is expected to carry no more than fifteen 
(15) hours per quarter. The course load for employed students should be 
appropriately reduced in consultation with their advisers. Students on 
academic probation or on Provisional Admissions status should carefully 
plan their course loads in consultation with their advisers. 

WITHDRAWAL, DROPPING COURSES, AND 
ADDING COURSES 

Withdrawal is, in the technical sense, dropping all courses and proces- 
sing a formal withdrawal through the Office of Graduate Studies which 
issues a withdrawal form. A student may withdraw from school (or drop a 
single course) at any time during the quarter. Only by formally withdraw- 
ing, however, can a student become eligible for the refund of fees as 
explained in the section on fees. The student bears the responsibility of 



29 



contacting the graduate office to effect a withdrawal and of contacting his 
professor(s) to determine what grade(s) he will receive (W or WF). In 
order to expedite any refund due, the student must initiate his with- 
drawal on the same campus where he paid fees. 

Dropping a course should also be formalized through the Graduate 
Office which will process a drop/add slip. If a student is taking only one 
course, the drop becomes, technically, a withdrawal, and a refund may be 
due. The student is responsible for contacting his instructor concerning 
the grade he will receive (W, WF). 

Adding a course is also formalized through the Graduate Office which 
will process a drop/add slip. Courses may be added only during the late 
registration days at the beginning of the quarter and not at any other 
time during the quarter. The student must pay the appropriate fee for the 
additional course, unless a course comparable in credit hours is being 
dropped simultaneously. 

The Graduate Council reserves the right to request the withdrawal of 
any student at any time during his course of studies if he does not meet 
the required standards of scholarship, or if he cannot remain in the 
program without endangering his own health or the health of others, or if 
he fails in any way to meet the standards of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program. 

CATES COURSES 

Savannah State College and Armstrong State College participate in the 
Coastal Area Teacher Education Service, a consortium of area public 
school systems and institutions of the University System of Georgia 
offering graduate and undergraduate courses in teacher education. 

A student who wishes to apply CATES course credit to his degree 
program must obtain approval from his adviser to take a course for 
degree credit prior to taking the course. Without this prior approval, the 
course is subject to being treated as a transfer course, in which case, the 
Transfer of Graduate Credits policies and procedures described in this 
Bulletin will be followed. 






30 



DEGREES AND GENERAL 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



DEGREES OFFERED 

The following degrees are offered in the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program: 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Education in Business Education 

Master of Education in Biology 

Master of Education in Chemistry 

Master of Education in Elementary Education 

Master of Education in Early Childhood Education 

Master of Education in Special Education — Behavior Disorders 

Master of Education in English 

Master of Education in Mathematics (being deactivated in 1977) 

Master of Education in History 

Master of Education in Political Science 

The sponsoring colleges have approved the addition to the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program of Master of Education degree programs in 
Industrial Arts Education and Science Education, and of Master of 
Science degree programs in Chemistry and Criminal Justice. Approval 
for the offering of these degree programs is pending action by the Board 
of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Any student who might 
be interested in one of these programs should request further information 
on the status of the program from the Office of Graduate Studies at either 
Savannah State College or Armstrong State College. 

TIME LIMITATION 

Students working toward a master's degree must complete all re- 
quirements for the degree within a period of not more than six years from 
the date of admission. Extension of time may be granted by the Graduate 
Council, upon recommendation of the student's major department, but 
only in cases of unusual circumstances. 

COURSE AND RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of sixty (60) quarter hours of graduate credits must be 
earned for the Master of Education degree. Credit for a minimum of 
thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in residence. Courses to be 
counted for residence may be accumulated on a full-time or part-time 
basis. 



31 



Satisfactory completion of sixty (60) quarter hours of approved 
graduate credits is required for the Master of Business Administration 
degree; thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in residence. 

BALANCE OF COURSES 

Two forms of balance in accumulating courses must be adhered to by 
degree-seeking students. First, at least fifty percent (50%) of the courses 
earned for a degree must be at the 600 level. 

Second, fifty percent (50%) of the courses applied to a degree must be 
earned at each of the two Colleges (Savannah State and Armstrong 
State). This balance of courses between the two Colleges includes a 50-50 
balancing of the required courses and a 50-50 balancing of the elective 
courses in each degree program. Minor deviations from this strict 50-50 
balancing of courses may be allowed where an odd number of courses in 
either the required or the elective category or in both categories requires 
the deviation. The departmental degree program descriptions identify 
the 600 level courses and provide additional guidance on balancing 
courses. 

DEGREE CANDIDACY 

Upon successful completion of twenty-five quarter hours of graduate 
work, and at least one quarter piror to making application for the degree, 
the student is required to file an application for admission to candidacy. 
The student will submit four copies of the completed application to his 
major department. Application forms are available in the Graduate 
Offices on both campuses. 

Approval of the application will be based upon verification that the 
student: 

1. has been admitted to full graduate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

2. has maintained a minimum of a "B" average in all work attempted. 

APPLICATION FOR THE DEGREE 

At the time specified on the academic calendar, the student must file an 
application for the appropriate master's degree with his major depart- 
ment. Note that the application for the degree must be preceded by the 
application for candidacy by at least one quarter. Application forms are 
available in the Graduate Offices. 



32 






SUMMARY OF GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

General regulations for obtaining a master's degree from the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program are summarized as follows: 

1. Admission to full graduate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

2. Admission to candidacy for the degree. 

3. Satisfactory completion of sixty (60) quarter hours of approved 
graduate level course work. 

4. Meeting certification requirements for M.Ed, programs (some prog- 
rams may have an option for no certification). 

5. Maintenance of "B" average. 

6. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination. 

7. Filing an application for the degree at the time specified. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The Master of Education degree is designed to comply with the 
requirements for teacher certification at the fifth level in the various 
areas of specialization. This degree ordinarially is granted only to 
students who qualify for T-5 certification (or equivalent certification for 
other states). This requirement entails meeting T-4 certification re- 
quirements (Georgia). However, some programs may have an option for 
no certification. 

Students who use graduate credits to meet T-4 certification require- 
ments may be required to take graduate courses beyond the 60 hours 
required for the M.Ed, degree in order to meet T-5 certification require- 
ments. Although the M.Ed, degree programs in the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program are designed to meet the requirements for approved 
programs for T-5, the designs assume that the student has already met 
T-4 certification requirements. All students without T-4 certification who 
are entering an M.Ed. Program (these students are referred to as "late 
decision" students) should consult with the Education Department at 
either College concerning specific courses to meet those requirements. 

Since the M.Ed, programs in the Joint Graduate Studies Program 
require 60 hours, which is 15 more than the 45 minimum required for the 
T-5 by the State Education Department, 15 of the 60 graduate hours may 
be used to fulfill T-4 certification requirements. However, none of the 15 
hours so used can then be applied toward meeting the 45 hours specified 
for the T-5. 

Detailed information concerning programs and procedures relating to 
graduate teacher certification may be obtained from the Office of 
Graduate Studies or from the Department of Education at either College. 

33 



IM 




t 



- 





DEPARTMENTS: PROGRAMS 
AND COURSES 



Departmental requirements covering admissions, prerequisite courses, 
and other aspects of the programs of study are described in this section of 
the Bulletin. 

PROGRAM COORDINATORS 

For each program of study, the department head on one campus serves 
as the Coordinator. The Coordinators alternate on a yearly basis between 
Armstrong State College and Savannah State College. The Coordinators 
terminate their roles in September of each year and, therefore, the 1978 
Coordinators begin their service in September, 1977. 

The Departmental Coordinators for 1977 and 1978 are: 

Business Administration: Dr. Thomas Eason (ASC), 1978 — Dr. Mary 

Torian (SSC), 1977. 
Business Education: Dr. Mary Torian (SSC), 1978 — Dr. Emory 

Richards (ASC), 1977. 
Biology: Dr. Margaret Robinson (SSC), 1978 — Dr. Leslie Davenport 

(ASC), 1977. 
Chemistry: Dr. Willie Tucker (SSC), 1978 — Dr. Henry Harris (ASC), 

1977. 
Elementary Education: Dr. Thelma Harmond (SSC), 1978 — Dr. William 

Stokes (ASC), 1977. 
English: Dr. Hugh Pendexter (ASC), 1978 — Dr. Luetta Milledge (SSC), 

1977. 
History and Political Science: Dr. Isaiah Mclver (SSC), 1978 — Dr. 

Roger Warlick (ASC), 1977. 
Mathematics: Mr. J. B. Clemmons (SSC), 1978 — Dr. Richard Summer- 

ville (ASC), 1977. 

COURSES 

Graduate courses are listed and described in each departmental sec- 
tion. The following course numbering system is used: courses numbered 
500-599 may be taken by undergraduate or graduate students and, in 
some cases, are courses that are cross-listed as both 400 and 500 courses. 
Courses numbered 600-699 or higher are for graduate students only. 

Each course listed shows the departmental identification, the course 
number, the course name, a code number and the campus location. The 
code number indicates: with the first number, the hours of lecture per 



35 



week; with the second number the hours of lab per week; and with the 
third number the quarter hours of credit for the course. Example: 
Chemistry 522. Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-0). 

Statements on prerequisites, campus location and descriptions follow 
the course numbers. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Thomas R. Eason, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Mary Torian, 
Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Alban (ASC); Dr. Anderson (SSC); Dr. 
Bhatia (ASC); Dr. Byrd (SSC); Dr. Hall (ASC); Dr. Johns (SSC); Dr. 
Laburtis (ASC); Dr. Lamb (ASC); Dr. McCarthy (ASC); Dr. O'Keefe 
(SSC); Dr. Richards (ASC); and Dr. Singh (SSC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Business Administration 

Coordinator — 1978, Dr. Thomas Eason 

OBJECTIVE 

The Master of Business Administration degree program is designed to 
give candidates a broad background of advanced professional training in 
organizational management. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general admission requirements and procedures for 
all graduate programs stated earlier in this bulletin, more specific 
requirements for admission to the MBA program are given below: 

All applicants for admission to the MBA program are required to take 
the Graduate Management Admissions Test. This test is administered at 
Savannah State College and at other testing centers once each quarter. 
The test is designed to measure aptitude for graduate study in business 
and is not a measure of knowledge in specific subjects. Therefore, 
applicants should not delay taking this examination simply because they 
have not had specific course work in business. 

REGULAR ADMISSION 

To qualify for admission to full graduate status in the MBA program, 
applicants must show competence in the common business core of 
knowledge, which requires a basic understanding of accounting, 
economics, finance, management, marketing, and statistics. Students 
who have received a bachelor's degree in business generally have fulfilled 



36 









this requirement, but students with degrees in other disciplines will need 
preparatory work in these areas before beginning MBA course work. The 
preparatory requirements may be met by the satisfactory completion of 
not less than one course (equivalent to 5 quarter hours or 3 semester 
hours) in each of the following areas: 

Accounting (Principles, Managerial, or Cost) 

Economics (Micro and Macro Principles) 

Finance (Business, Corporate, or Managerial) 

Management (Principles) 

Marketing (Principles) 

Statistics (Elements of) 

Normally, thirty hours of preparatory work will be the maximum 
required, but students should recognize that one course in accounting and 
one course in economics will provide only a minimum level of preparation 
for graduate course work. A better preparation could easily improve the 
performance in related graduate courses by one letter grade or even two. 

These preparatory requirements may be satisfied by taking approp- 
riate courses on campus, or by correspondence, or by scoring not less 
than the fifieth percentile on the appropriate subject examination(s) of 
the CLEP (College Level Examination Program). The CLEP examina- 
tions are available through the testing services of either College. 

In addition to appropriate preparatory work, regular admission status 
requires that one of the following admission standards be met: 

1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 and a score of not less 
than 450 on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or 

2. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 and a score of not less 
than 400 on the GMAT, or 

3. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 and a score of not less 
than 425 on the GMAT, or other combinations of grade point 
averages between 2.5 and 3.0 in conjunction with GMAT scores 
between 450 and 400 on an inverse scale. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

Provisional admission will be accorded those applicants who meet all 
the requirements for regular admission with the exception of preparatory 
course work. Upon satisfactory completion of the prerequisite courses, 
the conditional status will be removed and regular admission status will 
be accorded. 

Provisional Admission may be given to a limited number of applicants 
who fail to meet the admission standards for regular admission but, 
nevertheless, present evidence of a reasonable prospect of success in the 



37 



n 



program. For this category of admission applicants must have, in addition 
to appropriate preparatory work, one of the following: 

1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.2 and a score of not less 
than 425 on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or 

2. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 and a score of not less 
than 375 on the Graduate Management Admission Test, or 

3. Other combinations of grade point averages between 2.2 and 2.7 in 
conjunction with GMAT scores between 425 and 375 on an inverse 
scale. 

Upon completion of twenty-five hours of graduate course work with a 
"B" average, the Provisional Admission status will be changed to regular 
admission, providing all other requirements for Regular Admission have 
been satisfied. Failure to maintain a "B" average in the first twenty-five 
hours of graduate work will result in being dropped as a degree-seeking 
student. 

ADMISSION STATUS AS A 
PREREQUISITE TO MBA COURSES 

Stipulations and problems related to the pursuit of graduate study in 
the business administration courses are such that students should meet 
those conditions identified above under either the Regular or the Provi- 
sional Admissions categories in order to enroll in any MBA courses. 
Therefore, Post Baccalaureate Admissions offers little or no opportunity 
for graduate study in business administraton and is granted to MBA 
students primarily to identify applicants who have not yet submtited a 
satisfactory GMAT score or a satisfactory G.P.A. or have not completed 
the preparatory courses. 

ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, each student will be assigned 
a faculty adviser. The faculty adviser will approve the scheduling of 
course work, recommend the student for candidacy, and serve as 
chairman of the student's comprehensive examination committee. 



38 






COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Business Administration program requires forty-five 
quarter hours of core course requirements and an additional fifteen 
quarter hours of electives from graduate course offerings. 

Quarter Hours 
I. Core requirements 45 

BAD 602— Managerial Micro Economics (ASC) 

BAD 610— Managerial Statistics (SSC) 

BAD 611— Quantitative Methods in Business (ASC) 

BAD 620— Managerial Finance (ASC) 

BAD 630— Managerial Costing and Control (SSC) 

BAD 650— Marketing Problems Seminar (SSC) 

BAD 660 — Advanced Management Seminar (ASC) 

BAD 662— Human Behavior in Organization (SSC) 

BAD 665— Administrative Policy (ASC or SSC) 

II. Electives 15 



'tives . . 








BAD 601 
BAD 604 
BAD 605 


BAD 612 
BAD 613 
BAD 621 


BAD 640 


BAD 661 
BAD 663 



III. Balance of Courses. 

Students are required to take one-half of their course work on each campus. 
Responsibility for the MBA courses is divided between the two sponsoring colleges as 
indicated below: 

Required Courses 
Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BAD 610 BAD 650 BAD 602 BAD 620 

BAD 630 BAD 662 BAD 611 BAD 660 

BAD 665 offered at SSC or ASC 
All courses are scheduled to be offered in early and late evening periods. Courses are 
offered on one campus on Monday and Wednesday and the other on Tuesday and 
Thursday. Thus, there are four non-conflicting evening periods. Each required course 
is offered every other quarter. A full-time student, having all undergraduate pre- 
requisite courses, may complete the MBA program in four consecutive quarters. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

It will be the responsibility of the student to make application for 
admission to candidacy after the completion of all prerequisite courses 
and twenty-five hours of graduate course work. This application will be in 
four copies to the faculty adviser. Admission to candidacy is contingent 
upon verification that the student has attained a "B" average in twenty- 
five hours of course work and has met all regular admission requirements 
including: 

1. an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admissions Test. 

2. completion of all undergraduate prerequisite courses. 

3. removal of provisional admission status, when applicable. 

39 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A final comprehensive examination, to be scheduled in a student's final 
quarter and at least two weeks prior to graduation, is required of all 
candidates for the Degree of Master of Business Administration. The 
final examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of the 
student's faculty adviser as chairman and other members of the graduate 
faculty appointed by the MBA Coordinator. The date of the examination, 
the time and place, will be set by the Coordinator after consultation with 
the faculty adviser. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date, and time of the examination and the composition of the committee. 

The candidate is expected to demonstrate an adequate understanding 
of the common core of knowledge in business, economics, and statistics, 
and competency to discuss advanced material in those areas in which he 
has had graduate course work. 

The examinating committee's decision on the candidate's peformance 
on the comprehensive examination shall be reported as "S" or "U" to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 
Should the decision be reported as "U," the committee will outline a 
program of corrective action to be taken by the candidate prior to his 
being re-examined. 

Graduate Courses in Business Administration 

It should be understood that prerequisite to all MBA courses, the 
student must satisfy requirements in the common body of knowledge of 
business and administration as stated above. Waivers may be granted for 
certain courses. 

BAD 601. Macro Economic Analysis. (5-0-5). SSC. 
National income accounting. Determinants of national income, 
employment, price level and growth rates. 

BAD 602. Managerial Economics. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Economic analysis applied to decision making at the level of the firm. 
Analysis of demand, pricing, and cost. National income and firm forecast- 
ing problems. Financial and long term planning. 

BAD 604. Business Relations with Government and Society. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

The business environment with consideration of the economic, legal 
and social implications for policy making. 

BAD 605. Special Economic Problems. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Analysis of current economic issues. 



40 



BAD 610. Managerial Statistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Applications in economic and business statistics. 

BAD 611. Quantitative Methods in Business. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ite: BAD 610 or permission of instructor. 

The application of models and mathematical techniques to modern 
decision-making. 

BAD 612. Seminar in Business Research. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The application of research methods in both the internal and external 
domains of business. Guided research in a substantive field of the 
student's choice, i.e., finance, marketing, accounting, management, 
forecasting, or any other area in which the objectives of the research 
project is the acquisition of information useful to business enterprise. 

BAD 613. Administrative Communications. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The role of communication in effective business management; theory 
and principles necessary for practical applications; study of communica- 
tion problems within, between and among organizations, industry and 
their groups. 

BAD 620. Managerial Finance. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Analysis of financial problems and policies. 

BAD 621. Investment Management. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The theory and tools of analysis required in the management of 
financial assets from the viewpoint of the investor and the investment 
adviser. Investment media, markets, problems, practices, and 
philosophies will be studied. 

BAD 630. Managerial Costing and Control. (5-0-5). SSC. 
The study of physical and monetary input-output relationships and use 
of such cost studies for managerial strategy, planning, and control. 

BAD 640. Information Systems. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Total Information Systems for managerial strategy, planning and 
control. 

BAD 650. Marketing Problems Seminar. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An examination of new developments in the dynamic field of marketing 
from the viewpoint of the marketing decision-maker. 

BAD 660. Advanced Management Seminar. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The historical foundations and development of management concepts. 
Emphasis is upon developing concepts in dealing with emerging problems 
of management. 

BAD 661. Theory of Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A universally applicable study of organizations and their structures. 
Organizational factors and associated concepts are examined and 
analyzed. 



41 






BAD 662. Human Behavior in Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Contributions and limitations of the behavior sciences in the develop- 
ment of modern organization theory. 

BAD 663. Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Modern industrial relations and its background. Current problems in 
labor relations. 

BAD 665. Administrative Policy. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. Must be taken 
in the last or next to last quarter of the M.B.A. Program. 

Policy-making and administration from the top management point of 
view, encompassing the entire field of organizations. 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Business Education 

Coordinator — 1978, Dr. Mary Torian 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate program leading to the Master of 
Education Degree in Business Education are to prepare master teachers 
of business and vocational business education and to prepare individuals 
for administrative and supervisory positions in these specialties for the 
seocndary and junior college levels. 

In keeping with the objectives of the Joint Graduate Studies Program, 
the M.Ed, in business education is designed for furthering professional 
growth and competency, expanding professional and cultural 
backgrounds, and extending knowledge and understanding in business 
education. 

This program supplements undergraduate studies for the T-4 Certifi- 
cate to teach in Georgia and provides opportunities for candidates to 
obtain the T-5 Certificate upon completion of the prescribed curriculum in 
business education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Formal admission to the degree program should be sought through the 
Admissions Office of the Joint Graduate Program as described in the 
General Admissions section of this Bulletin. 

In accordance with general admission policies, Regular Admission with 
full graduate status requires the minimum 2.5 cumulative undergraduate 
average with a score of at least 500 on the N.T.E. Common (or 800 on the 
G.R.E. Aptitude). Regular Admission also requires a score of not less 
than 560 on the business education area examination of the NTE. 

Provisional Admission may be granted to those students who show 
potential for successful pursuit of graduate studies. In accordance with 



general admission policies, Provisional Admission requires the minimum 
G.P. A. and test score as called for in the general admission requirements. 
Provisional Admission also requires a score of not less than 540 on the 
business education area examination of the NTE. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in Business Education will be 
assigned an adviser. As soon as the student is notified of this assignment, 
he should arrange for a conference with his or her adviser. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Transfer of credits will be evaluated for full credit up to 50% of the 
required hours for graduation, but these credits must meet the general 
graduate policies on transfer of credit. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A minimum of 60 quarter hours of graduate course work with a B 
average (3.00) is required for graduation with an M.Ed, degree in 
Business Education. 

2. After admission to regular status in te graduate program, and Upon 
completion of 25 quarter hours of satisfactory graduate work, the 
student should file application for candidacy in quadruplicate to the 
major department. 

3. During the quarter preceding the final intended quarter of matricu- 
lation for the M.Ed, degree in Business Education (and by the 
deadline specified on the academic calendar), the candidate must file 
an application for the degree with the Graduate Studies Office. 

4. During the final quarter of residence, a candidate must pass a final 
comprehensive examination in the field. The Business Education 
Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten (10) days prior to the examination concerning th 
proposed place, date, and time of the examination and the composi- 
tion of the committee. The examining committee's decision on the 
candidate's performance on the comprehensive examination will be 
reported as "pass" or "fail" to the Deans for Graduate Studies within 
three (3) days after the examination. 



43 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
The basic plan of the curriculum is summarized as follows: 

Quarter Hours 

Professional Education Courses 15 

Business Education Content Courses 30 

(Includes BED 601 (5 hours), BED 611 (5 hours) and 10 hours of 
Business Administration cognate courses.) 

Electives 15 

Total 60 

The curriculum is designed with several options to meet the needs of 
varying specialists in the field of business teacher education. The course 
content of these options comes from appropriate selection of courses in 
the 30-hour business education content area, including the 10 hours of 
cognate courses. These options and specific courses required under each 
are: 

Option 1. Administration and Supervision: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 603, 611 and 612 
Option 2. Stenographic-Clerical: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 621, and 622. 
Option 3. General Business and Accounting: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 631, and 632. 
Option 4. Data Processing: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 623, and 624. 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Education Course Requirments 15 

Foundations 5 

EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

or 
EDN 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth 
and Development (SSC) 

or 
EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of Human 
Learning (SSC) 

Quarter Hours 

Curriculum and Methods 5 

EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

Research 5 

EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 



44 



II. Content Course Requirements 



30 



Content courses, including cognate courses, and elective* will be selected by the 
student based on his interests, aptitudes, and professional goals. A thesis option is 
available through registration in BED 690. BED 601 and BED 611 are required. 



BED 601 


BED 611 


BED 622 


BED 632 


BED 602 


BED 612 


BED 623 


BED 690 


BED 603 


BED 621 


BED 631 


BED 700 



All of the above courses carry 5 hours credit except 690 and 700 which carry 10 hours 
of credit each. 

Special Summer Workshop Courses Available 

BED 620—10 hours; combines BED 621 and 622. 
BED 630—10 hours; combines BED 631 and 632. 
BED 640—10 hours; combines BED 623 and 624. 

Workshops are offered alternately on each campus. 

Business Administration Cognate Courses 

As a part of the content area, a minimum of 10 hours of Business Administration 
courses is required. These courses, selected in conference with the student's adviser, 
should complement the selected option of concentration. 

III. Elective Course Requirements 15 

The 15 hours of electives may be selected from Business Administration courses and 
should complement the selected option of concentration. An appropriate course in 
exceptional children (EXC 522) must be taken if not taken previously. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. For the campus 
location of the Education courses, see the Education Department section of this 
Bulletin. For the campus location of the Business Administration courses, see the 
Master of Business Administration degree program in this section of this Bulletin. A 
guide to the campus location of the Business Education courses is given below. 



Savannah State College 



Armstrong State College 



BED 611 


BED 624 


BED 612 


BED 632 


BED 622 


BED 700 



BED 601 


BED 621 


BED 602 


BED 623 


BED 603 


BED 631 



BED 690 offered at both Colleges. 

BED 620, 630, and 640 — For more information, contact the Coordinator. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The student who does not hold the Georgia T-4 teaching certificate or 
its equivalent must satisfy the regulations of the State Department of 
Education through additional courses as may be required. 

The professional education requirements may be met, depending on the 
evaluation of the undergraduate transcript, through the fifteen hours of 



45 



electives and additional hours as may be required. See section on Teacher 
Certification under General Degree Requirements. 

Graduate Courses in Business Education 

BED 601. Principles, Problems, and Curriculum Development in Bus- 
iness Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive view of the basic principles and criteria for developing 
effective programs in business education on all levels, with special 
attention to problems of identification, growth, and contributions. 

BED 602. Current Problems and Issues in Vocational Business Edu- 
cation. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the principles of vocational education; federal and state 
legislation as it pertains to programs of vocational education; the organi- 
zation and operation of vobe programs; and related research. 

BED 603. Evaluation of Research and Empirical Literature in Busi- 
ness Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Critical analysis of research studies in business education; study and 
development of reports, research studies; investigations, and method of 
recording and retaining data, with special emphasis on administrative 
data. 

BED 611. Administration and Supervision in Business Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Principles, policies, and procedures in developing appreciation and 
understanding of and knowledge and skill in the art of effective administ- 
ration and supervision in business education. 

BED 612. Guidance and Career Development in Business Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The role of the business education teacher and administrator in 
developing an effective career development program: inclusive of selec- 
tion, recruitment, and grade or curriculum placement; keeping personnel 
records; a testing and evaluation program; counseling; placement; and 
followup. 

BED 621. Vocational Development in Shorthand and Typewriting. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Problems in development of occupational proficiency in shorthand and 
typewriting; new media and evaluation of aptitudes, interests, and 
achievement for vocational competency. 

BED 622. Vocational Development in Office Practice and Office 
Machines. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Enrichment of selected modules for developing vocational competency 
in the capstone course in Office Practice and in Office Machines. 



46 



BED 623. Introduction to the Teaching of Data Processing. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Introduction to data processing; development of key punching and 
basic programming skills. 

BED 624. Vocational Development in the Teaching of Data Proces- 
sing. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Mathematics 306 or equivalent computer 
programming skill. 

Systems, program languages, computer and keypunch operation, other 
input devices for developing modules and techniques of teaching modern 
methods of data processing. 

BED 631. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching General 
Bsiness. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive concentration on objectives, instructional materials, 
media, teaching technqiues, and evaluation procedures for general busi- 
ness and social business subjects. 

BED 632. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching Bookkeeping 
and Accounting. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The development of enrichment materials and techniques for effective 
teaching and learning in bookkeeping and accounting. 

BED 690. Research and Thesis. (10 quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 
(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

An in-depth study and concentration in the development of the thesis 
research problem. Seminar sessions for progress reporting and critical 
analysis. 

BED 700. Internship in Teaching and/or Administrative Office Prac- 
tice. (10 quarter hours). SSC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Internship teaching in vocational or secondary schools for those with 
needs in this area; full time work experience in structured offices for 
experienced teachers. 

BED 620. Workshop for Vocational Development in Stenographic 
Skills. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques and 
skills incorporated in BED 621 and BED 622 as described above. 

BED 630. Workshop for Vocational Development in General Business 
and Accounting. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques and 
skills incorporated in BED 631-632 as described above. 

BED 640. Workshop for Vocational Development in Data Processing. 
(10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of programming 
skills and the teaching of data processing. Combines BED 623 and 624. 



47 



BIOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Leslie Davenport, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Margaret Robin- 
son, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Beumer, (ASC); Dr. Emeh, (SSC); 
Dr. Guillou, (ASC); Dr. Hunter, (SSC); Dr. Krishnamurti, (SSC); Dr. 
Nambiar, (SSC); Dr. Pingel, (ASC); Dr. Singh, (SSC); Dr. Thorne, 
(ASC); and Dr. Woodhouse, (SSC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Biology 

Coordinator — 1978, Dr. Margaret Robinson 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to graduate courses in biology requires that a student meet 
the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program and be formally admitted as a graduate student. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Biology Faculty and a professinal adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each of his 
advisers and plan his program under their guidance, and should have at 
least one conference per quarter with his academic adviser. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 15 

EDN 671 — Educational Research — 5 hours 
Two courses (10 hours) from the following two areas: 
Foundations — 5 hours 
Curriculum and Methods — 5 hours 

II. Academic Courses — Biology 25 

In order to receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in Biology, the student will 
be expected to have acquired at least the following credits in either his upper division 
undergraduate work or in graduate work: 

15 quarter hours in botany 
15 quarter hours in zoology 
5 quarter hours in cell biology 

If the entering student has had no courses in any of these areas, his graduate program 
in biology must include courses to assure this diversification. Each student must 
include 5 quarter hours credit for the course, BIO 630, Biological Sciences in the 
Secondary School, which may be credited as either Biology or Education. 

The student entering the program with previous credits in biology will be required to 
take courses as needed in any of the indicated areas (botany, zoology, cell biology) to 



48 






assure the prescribed minimum diversification. In addition to meeting the minimum 
requirement for diversification, he will elect courses with the advice of his graduate 
advisers to meet the total requirements of 25 hours of biology plus elective to comply 
with item three (III) below. 

III. Electives — Biology and Education 25 

No more than 20 quarter hours of graduate credit may be taken in either field (Biology 
or Education), but this should not be interpreted to restrict any course work which 
exceeds the minimum requirements for th degree. An appropriate course in excep- 
tional children (e.g., EXC 522) must be taken if not taken previously. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one half of their 
required courses and one half of their elective courses at each of the two Colleges. A 
guide to the location of the biology courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BIO 500 BIO 525 BIO 630 BIO 550 BIO 540 ZOO 510 



BIO 501 


BIO 526 


BOT 607 


BIO 580 


BIO 510 


ZOO 525 


BIO 502 


BIO 527 


BOT 615 


BIO 605 


BOT 525 


ZOO 529 


BIO 506 


BIO 601 


BOT 625 


BIO 635 


BOT 620 


ZOO 535 


BIO 515 


BIO 609 


BOT 626 


BIO 640 


ZOO 605 


ZOO 645 


BIO 520 


BIO 612 








ZOO 645 



BIO 630 offered at either college 

For location of Education Courses, see the Education Department section of this 
Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in biology, each 
student is required to pass a comprehensive examination covering the 
areas in which he has had course work applicable to his decree, The 
examination may be oral or written. Oral examinations will last no more 
than one and one-half hours; written examinations will last no more than 
three hours. This examination will be completed no later than mid-term of 
the quarter preceding that in which graduation is anticipated. If the 
student should fail the examination, he may be re-examined orally or in 
writing, at the discretion of the departments, in areas of specific 
weakness only. The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans 
for Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the examination and the composition of 
the committee. The result of the examination will be reported to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 



49 



Graduate Courses in Biology 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Savannah State College: 

BIOLOGY 500. Physiological Ecology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Ecology and Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological adaptations 
of plants and animals to specific environments. Emphasis will be placed 
on the physiological problems faced by organisms common to the local salt 
marsh and marine environments. 

BIOLOGY 501. General Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Twenty hours of Biological Sciences, Organic Chemistry, and General 
Physics. 

A study of the physics and chemistry of mechanisms underlying 
functional occurrences in living organisms, particularly those involved in 
homeostasis. 

BIOLOGY 502. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
General Physiology. 

A systematic study of the functions of the organs in the animal kingdom 
and the physiological principles involved. 

BIOLOGY 506. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General 
and Field Botany and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to cellular and organismal functions important in the 
life of green plants with emphasis on the physical and chemical basis of 
the observed properties and processes. 

BIOLOGY 515. Marine Biology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General 
Botany and Invertebrate Zoology. 

An introduction to the physiological and ecological biology of microor- 
ganisms, plants, and animals of the sea and its shores. 

BIOLOGY 520. Molecular Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: Prin- 
ciples of Genetics and Organic Chemistry. 

The nature and function of genetic material, genetic code and physical 
basis of inheritance. The study also includes genetic control of cellular 
metabolism; mechanism of gene action; genetic capacity for biosynthesis; 
gene enzyme relationship; and chemical nature of agents of heredity. 

BIOLOGY 525. Bacterial Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Microbiology and General Physiology. 

A review of current knowledge of bacterial growth and reproduction 
considered at the molecular level. Study of cellular stucture growth- 
kinetics, the synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein, the regulation of 
metabolism and general cellular physiology; the patterns of energy 
generation and biosynthesis and their regulation. 



50 






BIOLOGY 526. Virology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Microbiology. 
A study of the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of the 
viruses with emphasis on the techniques of isolation and cultivation. 

BIOLOGY 527. Mycology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Microbiology. 
A study of the ecology, physiology, and systematics of microfungi with 
emphasis on those forms of industrial or general economic importance. 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Armstrong State College: 

BOTANY 510. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Botany 
203 and Organic Chemistry. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants and 
the conditions which affect these processes. 

BOTANY 525. Plant Morphology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisite: Botany 
203. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, 
structure, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 

BIOLOGY 540. Cytology. (2-6-5). ASC. Prerequisite: Two senior 
division courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differentiation, 
and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 550. Evolution. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: major in 
biology (at least 15 quarter hours credit in upper division courses). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 580. General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Two 
upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology). 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, coordinated with a study of populations and communities 
in the field. 

ZOOLOGY 510. General Veterbrate Physiology. (3-4-5). AS0. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the 
vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 525. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. (2-6-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and department 
head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine 
invertebrates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern coastal 
region. 



51 



ZOOLOGY 529. Endocrinology. (4-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Zoology 
410 and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism and 
reproductive cycles. 

ZOOLOGY 535. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Zoology 204, and Organic Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ systems 
involved in the maintenance of homestasis under varying conditions 
within normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues and systems 
under laboratory conditions. 

The following courses are open to graduate students only: 

BIOLOGY 601. Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology. (3-4-5). SSC. 
Prerequisites: Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and Principles of 
Genetics (5 hours). Recommended: Biochemistry and/or Microbiology. 

Concepts of biochemistry and biophysics of cells, nutrition, metabolism 
and energy transfer molecular genetics, cellular anatomy and physiology, 
cytology, and ultrastructure. 

BIOLOGY 609. Advanced Microbiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Introductory Microbiology or Bacteriology (5 hours) and complete sequ- 
ence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study of important pathogenic microorganisms producing human 
disease, including characteristics of microorganisms, principles of host- 
parasite relationships, epidemiology, and immunity. Consideration will 
be given to microorganisms in their natural and unnatural environments 
with emhasis on techniques used in evaluation of their presence and 
affects in food, water, and soil. 

BIOLOGY 612. Advanced Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: Prin- 
ciples of Genetics (5 hours) and complete sequence of Organic Chemistry. 

Study of gene structure and gene action from a molecular viewpoint. 
Recent concepts and experimental approaches for recombinational 
analysis, mutagenesis, and metabolism of DNA, RNA and protein will be 
discussed. 

BIOLOGY 630. The Biological Sciences in the Secondary Schools. 
(3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A course designed especially for high school biology teachers. A 
comprehensive study of national programs for high school biology with 
special emphasis on the BSCS approaches. Laboratory experiences will 
include utilization of actual BSCS materials and apparati. 

BIOLOGY 635. Advanced General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ites: General Ecology or Plant Ecology or Animal Ecology (5 hours). 
Recommended. Statistics. 



52 



Studies of the processes and functional aspects of population and 
community ecology emphasizing interaction between structure and the 
environment. Consideration will be given to problems of environmental 
pollution. 

BIOLOGY 640. Cellular Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and 5 hours of Physiology. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between microscopic 
anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolisms, and 
growth. 

BOTANY 607. Advanced Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequis- 
ites: One course in Plant Physiology (5 hours) and complete sequence in 
Organic Chemistry. 

Comparative study of nutritional requirements, metabolism, growth 
and development, respiration, photosynthesis, and other processes in 
selected vascular and non-vascular plants. 

BOTANY 615. Comparative Morphology of Non- Vascular Plants. (3- 
4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hours). Recommended: 
Plant Anatomy (5 hours). 

Comparative morphology of non-vascular plants emphasizing identifi- 
cation, life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 

BOTANY 620. Comparative Morphology of Vascular Plants. (3-4-5). 
ASC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hours). Recommended: Plant 
Anatomy (5 hours). 

Comparative morphology of vascular plants emphasizing identification, 
life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 

BOTANY 625. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. 

BOTANY 625. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequis- 
ites: General Botany (10 hours) and Plant Systematics (5 hours). 

A two-course sequence designed primarily for teachers, emphasizing 
the identification of local flora (vascular and non- vascular), phylogeny, 
environmental relationships, techniques for collection and preservation, 
and the selection and use of materials for correlating the study of plants 
with other subjects. 

ZOOLOGY 605. Advanced Animal Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: One course in General Physioology (5 hours) and complete 
sequence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study concerning functional activities of living organisms including 
humans in terms of both cellular and systemic functions. These topics 
include biological energetics, electrolyte distribution, transport through 
membranes, and colloidal state in biological systems. 

ZOOLOGY 645. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. 



53 



ZOOLOGY 646. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A two-course sequence designed primarily for teachers, emphasizing 
the identification of local fauna (vertebrate and invertebrate), phylogeny, 
environmental relationships, techniques for collection and preservation, 
and the selection and use of materials for correlating the study of animals 
with other subjects. 

CHEMISTRY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Henry Harris, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Willie Tucker, 
Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Brewer, (ASC); Dr. James, (SSC); Dr.Me- 
non, (SSC); Dr. Raut, (SSC); Dr. Robbins, (ASC); and Dr. Stratton, 
(ASC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Chemistry 

Coordinator— 1978, Dr. Willie Tucker 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in Chemistry must meet the 
general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies Program 
and must take the chemistry area examination of the National Teacher 
Examinations (NTE) in order to qualify for degree-seeking status. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Chemistry Faculty and a professional adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each of his 
advisers and plan his program under their guidance and should have at 
least one conference per quarter with each adviser. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Education Courses 15 

These courses are selected in consultation with the Education Adviser. A Professional 
Education Core group of courses which is required is shown below: 

EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) or 

EDN 632 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 

(SSC) or EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of 

Human Learning (SSC) 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 



54 



II. Chemistry Courses 25 

These courses are selected, in consultation with the student's chemistry adviser from 
the graduate courses in chemistry. 

III. Electives 20 

Electives are to be chosen through advisement and according to individual needs and 
may include courses in chemistry, education, or a suitable third field with the prior 
approval of the student's advisers. An appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., 
EXC 522) must be taken if not taken previously. 

IV. Transfer of Credits. 

Students who have earned graduate credits at an accredited institution may transfer a 
limited number of credits to be applied toward the M.Ed, degree in chemistry. 
Transfer of credit is handled on an individual basis. 

V. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirements by taking one half of their 
required courses and one half of their electives courses at the two Colleges. A guide to 
the location of the courses follows: 



Savannah State College 



Armstrong State College 



CHEM 500 
CHEM 541 
CHEM 581 
CHEM 592 
CHEM 600 
CHEM 610 
CHEM 621 



CHEM 631 
CHEM 641 
CHEM 682 
CHEM 692 
CHEM 694 
CHEM 699 



CHEM 522 
CHEM 551 
CHEM 561 
CHEM 591 
CHEM 600 
CHEM 642 



CHEM 662 
CHEM 681 
CHEM 683 
CHEM 691 
CHEM 693 
CHEM 698 



A guide to the campus location of the education courses is in the Education Department 
section of this bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in chemistry, each 
student is required to pass a comprehensive examination covering the 
areas in which he has had course work. The examination may be oral or 
written. Oral examinations will last no more than one and one-half hours; 
written examinations will last no more than three hours. This examina- 
tion will be completed no later than mid-term of the quarter preceding 
that in which graduation is anticipated. If the student should fail the 
examination, he may be reexamined orally or in writing, at the discretion 
of the departments, in areas of specific weakness only. The Coordinator 
shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate Studies ten days 
prior to the examination concerning th proposed place, date, and time of 
the examination and the composition of the committee. The result of the 
examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within 
three days after the examination. 



55 



Graduate Courses in Chemistry 

CHEMISTRY 500. Introduction to Chemical Research. (2-0-2). SSC. 
This course outlines systematic methods of literature research and 
preparation research outlines from reference to original articles. 

CHEMISTRY 522. Inorganic Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

Modern theory of structures and bonding, acid-base theories, and 
properties of some rare elements and unusual compound will be detailed. 
The latter includes nonstoichiometric compounds, rare gas compounds, 
and coordination complexes. 

CHEMISTRY 541. Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 
Basic organic chemistry to include structures, reactions, and reaction 
mechanisms. 

CHEMISTRY 551. History of Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the present. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of ideas, men who made signific- 
ant contributions, evolution of chemical theories and the modern social 
implications of science. 

CHEMISTRY 561. Biochemistry. (4-3-5). ASC. 
Study of buffers, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids, 
proteins, enzymes, Kreb's cycle and other metabolism routes. 

CHEMISTRY 581. Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 

The basic principles, theories, and application of fundamental analytical 
chemistry are examined. The concepts of dynamic equilibrium, gravimet- 
ric and volumetric analysis are stressed. 

CHEMISTRY 591. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 
This course is designed to cover the basic principles of thermodynamics 
and molecular structure and their applications to chemical systems. 

CHEMISTRY 592. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 591. 

Topics to be discussed will vary and will include subjects such as 
surface chemistry, photochemistry, irreversible processes and crystal 
structure. 

CHEMISTRY 600. Chemical Research. (0-15-5). SSC or ASC. 
Research under the supervision of a member of the Joint Graduate 
Chemistry Faculty. 

CHEMISTRY 610. Radiochemistry. (2-3-3). SSC. 

A general course dealing with nuclear structure, radioactive properties 
and decay characteristics of radioisotopes, their production and purifica- 
tion. Different types of detection of radiation, identification of 
radioisotopes and their practical applications will also be discussed. 



56 






CHEMISTRY 621. Chemistry for High School Teachers. (4-3-5). SSC. 
This course covers CHEM Study material and also Chemical Bonding 
Approach material for high school teachers. 

CHEMISTRY 631. Development of Chemical Theories. (3-0-3). SSC. 

A study of the basic principles upon which well known chemical 
theories are founded. Topics such as the kinetic molecular theory, 
chemical equilibria, and spectroscopy will be discussed. 

CHEMISTRY 641. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 541. 

Discussion of significant principles of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 642. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2-0-2). ASC. 

Discussion of significant principles of chemical bonding, steriochemis- 
try and conformation analysis, spectroscopy and similar topics which are 
applicable to an understanding of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 662. Biochemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 561. 

A consideration of the chemical and physical principles employed in the 
study of macromolecules of biological importance. 

CHEMISTRY 681. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 581. 
Advanced theories and methods of analytical chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 682. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (2-0-2). SSC. 

The current problems facing analytical chemistry are used to coordi- 
nate and to examine contemporary thought in this field. Problems such as 
trace environmental analysis, analysis of unique materials and non- 
destructive analysis will be treated. 

CHEMISTRY 683. Instrumental Analysis. (2-3-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 581. 

A study of the fundamental principles, construction and operational 
characteristics of modern instrumentation as related to physiochemical 
analytical techniques. Optical, electrometric and chromatograhic separa- 
tion procedures are discussed and practiced. 

CHEMISTRY 691. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 
An advanced study of molecular structure, the physical properties of 
matter and the nature of chemical bonding. 

CHEMISTRY 692. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3-0-3). SSC. 
A primary study of classical thermodynamics and energetics with 
applications to chemical systems. 



57 



CHEMISTRY 693. Quantum Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

A review of classical mechanics and the rise of wave mechanics. 
Applications of wave mechanics to simple molecules and approximation 
methods will be considered. A conceptual formulation of the quantum 
theory and discussion of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation. 

CHEMISTRY 694. Chemical Kinetics. (3-0-3). SSC. 

A study of rate processes and reaction mechanisms. Topics such as 
theories of reaction rates, activation energies, reactions in solution, 
homogenous and heterogenous catalysis, and experimental method will 
be covered. 

CHEMISTRY 698. Seminar (2-0-2) and Chemistry 699, Seminar (2-0- 
2). ASC and SSC. 

Discussion of selected topics. 

EDUCATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Thelma Harmond, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. William Stokes, 
Department Head, (ASC); Dr. J. C. Adams, (SSC); Dr. J. V. Adams, 
(ASC); Dr. Agyekum, (SSC); Dr. Barber, (ASC); Dr. Bland, (ASC); Dr. 
Burgess, (SSC); Dr. Cochran, (SSC); Dr. Eaton, (SSC); Dr. Gadsden, 
(SSC); Dr. Lane, (ASC); Dr. Lawson, (SSC); Dr. Lentini, (ASC); Dr. 
Newberry, (ASC); Dr. Robinson, (SSC); Dr. Sartor, (SSC); Dr. Stephens, 
(SSC); Dr. Sumner, (SSC); and Dr. Ward, (ASC). 

Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 

Master of Education in Elementary Education and in 

Early Childhood Education and in 

Special Education-Behavior Disorders 

Coordinator — 1978, Dr. Thelma Harmond 

OBJECTIVES 

By offering advanced preparation to those who professionally serve in 
schools, the Colleges hope to aid in the development of teachers who 
possess the highest qualities of character, commitment, and professional 
competence. This aim will be facilitated by (1) encouraging the student to 
do scholarly study in advanced professional, specialized and general 
education subject matter; (2) helping the student become acquainted with 
the most recent research developments in child developments in child 
growth and development and the latest trends in curriculum; (3) deepen- 
ing his appreciation for performance in scientific investigation and 
research; and (4) promoting personal and professional maturity of the 
student that will be reflected in his relationships as he goes about his 
work in the communitv and in the field of education. 



58 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the elementary education, the early childhood, and 
the special education programs must satisfy all general admission re- 
quirements of the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after admission each student will be assigned an adviser in the 
Department of Education. As soon as he is notified of this assignment, 
the student should schedule an appointment with his adviser to determine 
any conditions and specific requirements the student must meet in order 
to complete both his degree and certification objectives. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

The Department of Education offers several specialization programs 
under the aegis of the M.Ed, degree in elementary education. These 
specialized programs of study provide, in addition to the graduate major 
in elementary education which leads to T-5 certification in this area, 
opportunity for students to qualify for certain other kinds of certification. 
Students should inquire at the Department of Education for certification 
opportnities provided by these specialized programs. 

Graduate students majoring in elementary education must complete a 
minimum of sixty quarter hours of approved courses. These hours are 
divided as follows: Professional Sequence — 20 hours; Specialization 
Courses — 25 hours; and Approved Electives — 15 hours. One course in 
reading must be taken if not taken previously as well as an appropriate 
course in exceptional children if not taken previously. 

The specialized content courses for elementary education may be 
chosen from the following areas: art and music; foreign languages; health 
and physical education; languages arts, including reading, literature, 
speech, linguistics; mathematics and science; and the social studies. 
Educational background, types of teaching experience, specific needs, 
interests and the goals of students will be the deterinants for staff 
advisement in student selection of content areas. Upon the basis of the 
foregoing factors, students may choose specialized courses from two or 
from several of the content areas. 



59 



Hours 

I. Professional sequence courses 20 

Required of students in all elementary education programs. 

EDN — 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 

or 
EDN 622— Nature and Conditions of Human Learning. (Both at SSC) 

plus 
EDN 631— Social Fondations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

plus 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

II. Courses appropriate to major field and specialization 40 

A. Courses for the conventional major in elementary education. 

1. Major field (content) courses in 

elementary education 25 

Selected, with avisement, from the following 
courses: 

EDN 540 — Teaching Language Arts in Elemen- 
tary School (ASC) 
EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) 
EDN 542 — Reading and Literature for Children 

(SSC) 
EDN 591 — Science for Elementary and ECE 

Teachers (ASC) 
EDN 601 — The Language Arts in the Educative 

Process (SSC) 
EDN 642 — Seminar in Elementary Education 

(SSC) 
EDN 643— Problems in Reading (SSC) 
EDN 691— Environmental Science (ASC) 
EDN 696 — Geography for Elementary Teachers 

(SSC) 
EDN 697— Social Studies for Elementary and 

ECE Teachers (ASC) 
MATH/EDN 592— Modern Mathematics for 

Elementary and ECE Teachers (ASC) 
ZOO/EDN 692— Zoology for Elementary Teachers 

(SSC) 
BOT/EDN 693— Botany for Elementary Teachers 

(SSC) 
CHEM/EDN 694— Chemistry for Elementary 

Teachers (SSC) 
PSci/EDN 695— Earth Science for Elementary 

Teachers (SSC) 

2. Electives 15 

Elective courses selected with advisement. 

B. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization in early 
childhood education. 

1. Major field courses in elementary education 25 

Same as in A above. 

60 



2. Specified electives only; prescribed courses arc: 15 

EDN 627— Child Growth and Development (AS( ') 
EDN 647 — Curriculum for Early Childhood Edu- 
cation (SSC) 
EDN 802— Practicum in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (ASC or SSC) 

C. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization in 
supervising teacher services.* 

1. Major field courses in elementary education 25 

Same as in A above. 

2. Specific electives only; prescribed courses are: 15 

EDN 581 — Directing and Evaluating Student 

Teaching* 
EDN 582 — Internship for Supervising Teachers* 
EDN 583 — Seminar in Supervision* 

D. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization in 
reading. 

1. Specialization courses in reading 25 

Selected, with advisement, from the following 
courses: 

EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) 
EDN 643— Problems in Teaching Reading (SSC) 
EDN 644 — Issues in Diagnosing and Prescribing in 

the Reading process (SSC) 
EDN 653— Remedial Reading (Practicum) (ASC) 
EDN 354 — Organization and Supervision of the 

Reading Program (ASC) 
EDN 543— Reading in the Secondary School (SSC) 

2. Approved electives 15 

These courses specified by the Education Depart- 
ment to insure meeting elementary education 
major requirements. 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows these program outlines. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Hours 

I. Professional Sequence Courses 25 

EDN 627— Child Growth and Development (ASC) 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

or 
EDN 637— Foundation of Early Chldhood Education (SSC) 
EDN 647— Early Childhood Education Curriculum (SSC) 
EDN 657— Early Childhood Education Methods (ASC) 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 



"See departmental section on balance of courses. 

61 



II. Courses appropriate to the early childhood education major 35 

A. Content courses to cover diversified areas 30 

1 . Two courses from: 10 

EDN 540 — Teaching Language Arts in Elemen- 
tary School and ECE (ASC) 

EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) — 
required if a reading course not taken previ- 
ously. 

EDN 542 — Reading and Literature for Children 
(SSC) 

2. Three courses from: 15 

EDN 591— Science for Elementary and ECE 

Teachers (ASC) 
MATH/EDN 592— Modern Mathematics for 

Elementary and ECE Teachers (ASC) 
EDN 628 — Movement Exploration and Motor 

Learning in Children (SSC) 
EDN 658 — Creative Activities in Art, Music, 

Dance, and Drama (SSC) 
EDN 691— Environmental Science (ASC) 
EDN 697— Social Studies for Elementary and 

ECE Teachers (ASC) 

3. Required: 5 

EDN 802— Practicum in ECE (ASC or SSC) 

B. Electives 5 

EXC 522 must be taken if an appropriate course in exceptional 
children has not been taken previously. 
Selected with advisement. 

EDN 521— Tests and Measurements (ASC) 
EDN 522 — Introduction to Exceptional Children 

(SSC) 
EDN 63&— The Young Child and His Family, 

School, Community (ASC) 
EDN 651— Newer Teaching Media II (ASC) 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows these program outlines. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
SPECIAL EDUCATION— BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professinal Sequence 20 

Same as Elementary Professional Sequence 

EDN 621 or EDN 622 EDN 641 

EDN 631 EDN 671 



62 



II. Specialization Courses 30 

EXC522 EXC685 EXC 700 may be taken in lieu 

EXC 680 EXC 686 of 685, 686, and 687, but five 

EXC 681 EXC 687 additional elective hours arc 

needed to compensate for lost 
hours (EXC 700 is only a 10- 
hour credit course). 

III. Electives 10 

A course in the teaching of reading must be taken if not taken previously. 

EXC 525 EXC 623 EXC 673 

EXC 526 EXC 654 EDN 653 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of these elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows these program outlines. 

COURSES FOR INTERRELATED 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Several courses in exceptional children contribute to the needs of 
specialists in Interrelated Special Education. Specific courses in this area 
include EXC 522, EXC 641, EXC 682, EXC 683, and EXC 684. For 
additional information regarding the contribution that these courses may 
make toward certification and professional needs, contact the Education 
Department. 

BALANCE OF COURSES FOR 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT COURSES 

*The educational supervision courses, EDN 581, 582, and 583, are open 
only to students who receive special permission to enroll in them. These 
courses deal with the preparation of teachers for the supervision of 
student teaching, an undergraduate activity on each campus. The de- 
partments on each campus may arrange for team teaching with a 
represenative from each College. 

**Courses with a double asterisk are offered at both Colleges. 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Professional Sequence Courses 

END 621 or 622 EDN 631 

END 641 EDN 631 



63 



Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Content Courses for Elementary Education 





EDN 542 
EDN 601 
EDN 642 
EDN 643 
EDN 696 


ZOO/EDN 692 
BIO/EDN 693 
PSi/EDN 695 
CHEM/EDN 694 


EDN 540 
EDN 541 
EDN 591 


EDN 691 
EDN 697 
MATH/EDN 592 




Additional Courses for Elementary Education Programs 




EDN 543 


EDN 644 


EDN 703 


EDN 521 


EDN 653 


EDN 702 


EDN 611 


EDN 661 


EDN 673** 


EDN 551 


EDN 654 


EDN 673** 


EDN 632 


EDN 662 


EDN 700** 


EDN 625 


EDN 672 


EDN 700** 










EDN 651 












EDN 581,*, EDN 582* 


, and EDN 583 


* 





Early Childhood Education Courses 

EDN 628 EDN 627 

EDN 637 EDN 638 

EDN 647 EDN 657 

EDN 658 EDN 802** 
EDN 802** 

Special Education Courses 

EXC 522 EXC 536 EXC 623 EXC 681 

EXC 525 EXC 680 EXC 654 EXC 683 

EXC 682 EXC 641 

NOTE: EXC 685, EXC 686, and EXC 687 may be taken at both Colleges but at least one of these three courses must be 
taken at each College if used for the B.D. degree. EXC 684 available at both colleges. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A committee of the faculty of the Joint Graduate Education Depart- 
ment will administer an oral examination to all candidates for the 
Master's degree. The chairman of the examining committee will be the 
student's adviser. The student and his adviser will select the other two 
members of the examining committee. This committee will have at least 
one representative from each of the two campuses. The committee should 
also have a representative from one ofthe content areas on the student's 
degree plan. 

The chairman will select, in consultation with the student, the date, 
time, and place for the examination and will report this information and 
the results of the examination to the Coordinator. 

The Coordinator shall notify the Deans for Graduate Studies ten days 
prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, data and time of 



64 



the examination and the composition of the Committee. The result of the 
examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within 
three days after the examination. 

Graduate Courses in Education 

EDUCATION 521. Tests and Measurements. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Principles and procedures in evaluating pupil growth. 

EDUCATION 540. Teaching Language Arts in Elementary School. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Exploration in the four broad areas of the language arts. Investigation 
of pertinent research of the past decade; opportunities for enriching 
experiences with media through demonstration. 

EDUCATION 541. Method of Teaching Reading. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Basic principles and methods underlying the elementary school reading 
program. 

EDUCATION 542. Reading and Literature for Children. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is designed to acquaint elementary teachers with the 
stimulating language environment of the wide world of literature for 
children. The literature approach of language learning seeks to assist the 
teacher in guiding children to become active, sensitive learners who seek 
to explore, inquire, and discover. 

EDUCATION 543. Reading in the Secondary School. (5-0-5). SSC. 
This course is designed to acquaint teachers with teaching reading in 
content areas. 

EDUCATION 551. Newer Teaching Media I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The first course in a two-course sequence. Multisensory learning and 
the utilization of audiovisual materials, newer teaching hardware, and 
programmed materials. 

EDUCATION 581. Directing and Evaluating Student Teaching. (5 
quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 

Information, skills and understandings required for effective supervi- 
sion of student teachers. Selected teachers. 

EDUCATION 582. Internship for Supervising Teachers. (5 quarter 
hours.) SSC and ASC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Cooperative field experience involving public school teachers, student 
teachers, college personnel. 

EDUCATION 583. Seminar in Supervision. (5 quarter hours). ASC 
and SSC. 

An opportunity for experienced supervising teachers to evaluate 
criteria and to develop plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 



65 



EDUCATION 591. Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Opportunities for acquiring basic knowledge in science appropriate for 
the elementary grades. 

EDUCATION 601. The Language Arts in the Educative Process. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Provisions for an examination of language developments. Current 
issues and recent research in the language arts curriculum. Theoretically 
and practically, students will be aided in finding adequate solutions to 
language problems which confront them in the daily teaching experience. 

EDUCATION 661. Philosophy and History of Education. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

Modern philosophical systems and their impact on educational theory 
and practice. 

EDUCATION 621. Advanced Studies in Human Growth and De- 
velopment. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A comprehensive view of human growth and development with em- 
phasis upon the recent literature in these fields. 

EDUCATION 622. The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

An advanced study of the various theories of learning with emphasis 
upon the latest ideas in this field. 

EDUCATION 625. Contemporary Problems in Educational Psychol- 
ogy. (5-0-5). ASC- Prerequisites: Two or more courses in psychology or 
sociology or a combination of the two. 

A seminar to explore contemporary problems of a psycho-social nature 
affecting education. 

EDUCATION 631. Social Foundations of Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Basic graduate course in the contribution of the social sciences to 
education, focused on the significant issues and problems of education. 

EDUCATION 632. Education and Minority Group Problems. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A study of intergroup education related to the problems of American 
ethnic, racial, and religious minorities. 

EDUCATION 641. Curriculum Planning. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Trends, issues, and understandings needed for curriculum develop- 
ment and teaching. 

EDUCATION 642. Seminar in Elementary Education. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Opportunities to analyze issues, theories and practices in elementary 
education. Credit, one to five quarter hours. 



66 



EDUCATION 643. Problems in Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Investigation of problems met in the teaching of reading. 

EDUCATION 644. Issues in Diagnosing and Prescribing in the Read- 
ing Process. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisites: EDN 541, EDN 643, or approval 
of instructor. 

Designed to evaluate primary issues in differentiated instruction. 
Examination of techniques employed in diagnosing and prescribing for 
reading difficulties. 

EDUCATION 651. Newer Teaching Media II. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: EDN 551. 

An advanced course contininung in-depth study of newer teaching 
media. 

EDUCATION 653. Remedial Reading. (Practicum). (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: EDN 644 or approval of instructor. 

A study of the various methods and materials utilized to test and teach 
remedial readers. The student will be required to tutor one poor reader. 

EDUCATION 661. Principles and Practices of Guidance. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An introduction to the philosophy and procedures of guidance in both 
the elementary and secondary school. 

EDUCATION 662. Guidance in Elementary School. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Application of the guidance point of view and guidance techniques to 
the elementary school classroom. Emphasis is upon the teacher's role in 
cooperating with professional guidance workers. 

EDUCATION 671. Educational Research. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Methodology of educational research and its application to instruction 
and guidance. 

EDUCATION 672. Field Project. (5 hours credit). SSC. 
An "on-the-job" research project dealing with improvement in the 
student's specific situation. 

EDUCATION 673. Individual Research. (5 hours credit). ASC or 

SSC. 

EDUCATION 675. Individual Study in Education. (1 to 5 hours). 
ASC. Opportunities provided for supervised research and independent 
study in selected areas. Research and reading in education to meet the 
needs of students involved. Designed for students with a knowledge of 
research. All work offered on an individual basis with the approval of 
department chairman, advisor, and instructor concerned. Prerequisite: 
EDN 671. 

EDUCATION 676. Individual Study in Education. (1 to 5). SSC. 
Advanced individual study similar to EDN 675. Approval of department 
chairman, advisor, and instructor concerned necessary. Prerequisites: 
EDN 671. 

67 



EDUCATION 691. Environmental Science. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Exploration of science principles through problem-solving. Designed to 
make environmental science situations meaningful. 

ZOO/EDN 692. Zoology for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Modern approaches to teaching the biological sciences. Emphasis on 
understanding of life processes in the animal kingdom. 

BOT/EDN 693. Botany for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lecture — laboratory course dealing with principles involved in 
classifying and indentifying plant life. 

CHEM/EDN 694. Chemistry for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A study of the more important metallic and non-metallic elements with 
emphasis on practical application at the elementary school level. 

PSci/EDN 695. Earth Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Composition of earth, classification and identification of rocks and 
minerals. 

EDUCATION 696. Geography for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A critical examination of instructional procedures and techniques in 
teaching geography in elementary grades. Selection, organization and 
presentation of structured facts of human environment, both cultural and 
physical. Emphasis given to the conceptual approach in the analysis of 
space and regional interaction. 

EDUCATION. 697. Social Studies for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Investigation of newer approaches to social studies teaching. Emphasis 
on related skills as map and graph reading. Analysis of behavioral 
objectives for social studies teaching. 

EDUCATION 700. Internship. (10 hours credit). ASC or SSC. (Grade 
awarded, S or U only.) 

Students who hold teaching positions in schools and/or clinic settings 
will be supervised by college staff members for one academic year. 
Supervisors will observe and hold conferences with each candidate. 
Students must complete one academic year to receive credit. 

EDUCATION 702. Seminar in Education for Staff Development. 
(Variable credit). ASC. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an 
approved staff development activity sponsored by a local school system. 
Admission to the course must be approved by the student's adviser and 
by the department head. 

This course is designed to provide a framework through which teachers 
and local school systems, in conjunction with the college, may offer 



68 



graduate credit for approved staff development activities. Credit for this 
course may be approved for either content or elective work. 

With a change in content, this course may be repeated for additional 
credit. 

EDUCATION 703. Seminar in Education for Staff Development. 
(Variable credit). SSC. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an 
approved staff development activity sponsored by a local school system. 
Admission to the course must be approved by the student's adviser and 
by the department head. 

This course is designed to provide a framework through which teachers 
and local school systems, in conjunction with the college, may offer 
graduate credit for approved staff development activities. Credit for this 
course may be approved for either content or elective work. 

With a change in content, this course may be repeated for additional 
credit. 

Graduate Courses in Education - 
Early Childhood Education 

EDN 627. Child Growth and Development. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Lecture and laboratory. Basic concepts and problems of child develop- 
ment; observation, behavior patterns, child study. 

EDN 628. Movement Exploration and Motor Learning in Children. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Develop understandings, skills, and teaching techniques and methods 
in the basic activities appropriate to the teacher of movement education. 

EDN 637. Foundations of Early Childhood Education. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Historical developments, philosophy and objectives of nursery schools, 
kindergartens, and day care centers; exploration of teacher-child and 
teacher-family interactions, diagnosis and evaluation of children. 

EDN 638. The Young Child and His Family, School, Community. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Interaction with community for services and resources. Family study 
from many different angles, utilizing data from various field, developing 
skills in procedures and techniques for working with parents. 

EDN 647. Early Childhood Education Curriculum. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Content, approaches, methods and materials appropriate for young 
child as presented in interdisciplinary or experience approach emphasiz- 
ing how language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, and the 
creative arts are adopted to skills and needs of children. 

EDN 627. Early Childhood Education Methods. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of research and programs for children under eight and 



69 



implications for program development. Developing skills in translating 
concepts into classroom practice for young children. 

EDN 658. Creative Activities in Art, Music, Dance and Drama. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Course focuses on activities in each of four areas and presented in an 
interdisciplinary approach. 

EDN 802. Practicum in Early childhood Education. (5 hours credit). 
ASC or SSC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Supervised experience in classroom with children under six. Seminars 
and projects planned according to students' needs. 

Graduate Courses in Education- 
Exceptional Children 

EXC 522. Introduction to Exceptional Children. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An introductory study of the identification, diagnosis, and education of 
the atypical child. 

EXC 525. Mental Hygiene in Teaching. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A consideration of the forces and influences on what constitutes normal 
behavior in personal and social relationships within the school setting. 
Student behavior, teacher behavior, and student-teacher interaction 
dynamics will receive major attention. Open to qualified undergraduate 
students, graduate students, and teachers seeking renewal of certifi- 
cates. 

EXC 526. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. (5-0-5). SSC. 

EXC 623. Assessment and Measurement of the Exceptional Child. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

This course will emphasize the means and interpretations of psycholog- 
ical, psychiatric, educational, and other evaluations. It will attempt to 
help the teacher understand and make relevant the test specialists' 
report. 

EXC 641. Teaching of Reading to Exceptional Children. (3-4-5). ASC. 

First half of course consists of classroom instruction in procedures for 
teaching reading. Second half of course consists of tutoring an exceptional 
child in reading under the instructor's supervision. 

EXC 654. Behavioral Intervention Procedures for Children. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

To acquaint students with historical background, developments, con- 
cepts, definitions, terminology, and techniques of behavioral interven- 
tion, as well as application of such procedures. 

EXC 673. Independent Research. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. 



70 



EXC 680. Behavior Pathology in Children. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
EXC 522. 

A study of the epidemeology, etiology, prognosis, and treatment of 
behavior disorders in children. An extensive examination of the social 
milieu will characterize the course. 

EXC 681. Education of the Emotionally Disturbed. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: EXC 680. 

The student will survey the various types of programs and approaches 
historically and currently in operation for the emotionally disturbed child. 
Emphasis will be placed on those programs within the public school 
setting. 

EXC 682. Nature of Learning Disabilities and Mental Retardation. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Definitions, orientation, characteristics, assessement, contributions of 
major authorities, and terminology for the learning disabled child. 
In-depth study of the psychological and sociological aspects of education- 
ally handicapping conditions and of the children who display those 
conditions for the mentally retarded child. 

EXC 683. Methods and Materials for Teaching Learning Disabled and 
Mentally Retarded Children. (3-4-5). ASC. 

Procedures for identifying strengths and weaknesses of students, using 
multisensory approaches, analyzing tasks into component parts, design- 
ing and using instructional materials, writing instructional objectives, 
and individualizing classroom instruction. 

EXC 684. Practicum in Learning Disabilities. Behavior Disorders, 
and Mental Retardation. (0-10-5). SSC or ASC. (Grade, S or U only.) 

The student will be required to interact with students from all three 
areas for a minimum of 10 clock hours per week. In those cases where 
students cannot be placed in a program serving all three categories of 
children, the student will be required to spend one third of the quarter 
with children from each area. The student will be expected to have direct 
involvement in teaching exceptional children. 

EXC 685-686-687. Practicum in Special Education (5 hours credit each 
course). (Grades awarded, S or U only.) 

EXC 685. Five hours to be taken among the first twenty-five hours of 
the student's program. During this time the student will be required to 
interact with behavior disordered and/or multiple handicapped children a 
minimum of eight clock hours per week in programes designed to 
ameliorate the disability. It is recommended that the student participate in 
two or more programs. ASC or SSC. 

EXC 686. Prerequisite: EXC 685. Five quarter hours of individual 
studies under the direction of the student's adviser, or the adviser's 



71 



designate, to be taken prior to the five final hours of practicum. The 
individual studies program will be designed so that the student develops 
proficiency in a minimum of one mode of treatment for behavior disordered 
children. The student will be required not only to develop expertise in a 
theoretical approach but be afforded the opportunity to interact with a 
student, or students, in tutorial situations for practical applications of the 
theoretical model selected for study. ASC or SSC. 

EXC 687. Prerequisite: EXC 686. Five hours taken during the termi- 
nal stages of the student's program. The student will be required to serve a 
minimum of ten clock hours per week in facilities designed for behavior 
disordered and/or multiple handicapped children. The student will be 
expected to have direct involvement in teaching exceptional children. A 
portion of this five quarter hours must be served in a residential facility. 
ASC or SSC. 

EXC 700. Internship. (10 hours credit). ASC or SSC. (Grade awarded, 
S or U only.) See EDN 700 for general requirements; course runs one 
academic year. 

ENGLISH 

FACULTY 

Dr. Luetta Milledge, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Hugh Pendex- 
ter, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Brooks, (ASC); Dr. Daub, (SSC); Dr. 
Jones, (ASC); Dr. Killorin, (ASC); Dr. Lawson, S(ASC); Dr. Lunz, (SSC); 
Dr. Maher, (SSC); Dr. O'Neil, (SSC); Dr. Propst, (ASC); Dr. Stevenson, 
(SSC); and Dr. Strozier, (ASC). 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in English 

Coordinator — 1978, Dr. Hugh Pendexter 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of English, in cooperation with the Department of 
Education, offers a program of study leading to the Master of Education 
degree with a concentration in English. The objectives of this program of 
study are: 

1. To upgrade the teaching of secondary school English by increasing 
the competencies of English teachers in the areas of linguistics, 
composition, and literature; 

2. To enable teachers of English in Secondary schools to pursue study 
that will enrich their skills, knowledge, and understanding in the 
teaching of language, composition, and literature; 



72 



3. To provide opportunities for professional growth and cultural en- 
richment for individuals holding the bachelor's degree but having no 
further degree or citification objectives; 

4. To enable teachers of English in secondary schools to qualify for the 
T-5 certificate. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

AND 

GENERAL COURSE PREREQUISITES 

All students entering the M.Ed, program in English must present the 
Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test in Literature and English. 
A student who scores 560 or above and who meets the general 
requirements for Regular Admission will be given Regular Admission 
Status. A student who scores below 560 will be limited to Provisional 
status (or Post Bacculaureate status if required by onther admissions 
criteria) and will be required to retake the examination until the 560 score 
is attained or, alternatively, must take supporting work as prescribed by 
the English Department as a condition for Regular status and as a 
condition for enrollment in any graduate English course. The prescribed 
work shall consist of four undergraduate courses on the 300 or 400 level, 
approved by the student's adviser, in which no grade lower than B shall 
be made. Half of these courses shall be taken on each Campus. It is 
crucial that the student have his adviser's approval before scheduling 
undergraduate courses as supporting work. (These approved under- 
graduate courses should be entered on the students advisement sheet.) 

Upon meeting one of these two conditions (560 score or completing the 
prescribed supporting work), the student may enroll in graduate English 
courses and May also advance to Regular status in accordance with 
general admission requirements. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in English will be assigned an 
academic adviser from the English Department and a professional 
adviser from the Education Department. As soon as the student is 
notified of this assignment, he should arrange for a conference with his 
advisers. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Summary of Requirements 



Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 15 

II. English Courses (required, plus electives) 40 

III. Elective Courses 5 

IV. Balance of Courses 

73 



I. Professional Education Courses 15 

EDN 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development (SSC) 

or 
EDN 622 — The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning (SSC) 

or 
EDN 631 — Social Fondations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641 — Curriculum Planning (SSC) and 
EDN 671 — Educational Research (ASC) 

II. English Courses 40 

A. A student may count no more than 15 hours of 500 level work toward the degree. 

B. English 620, 621, and 622 are required of all students. 

C. English 500, 503, 690, and 691 may be taken twice if the course is offered a second 
time with a different topic. 

III. Elective Course 5 

Because the courses in the teaching of reading and in exceptional children are required 
for certification, a student must present at least one of these as part of his undergraduate 
record before he will be admitted to candidacy for the M.Ed, degree in English or must 
present the equivalent graduate course in addition to the sixty (60) hours normally 
required in the M.Ed, program. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 



ENG 503 


ENG 642 


ENG 621 


ENG 660 


ENG 622 


ENG 665 


ENG 626 


ENG 666 


ENG 630 


ENG 691 



ENG 500 


ENG 641 


ENG 630 


ENG 650 


ENG 625 


ENG 662 


ENG 627 


ENG 664 


ENG 631 


ENG 690 


ENG 640 





A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the Education Department 
section of this Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Each candidate for the Master of Education degree with a concentration 
in English must pass a written comprehensive examination. The 
comprehensive examination will be based on the reading list in language 
and literature which must be secured by the student at the time of his 
matriculation. The student may choose to be examined under any reading 
list in force during the time of his enrollment. Copies of the reading list are 
available in the office of the Coordinator. For more specific information 
concerning the comprehensive examination, contact the Coordinator. 

The comprehensive examination covers two areas: 1) literature before 
1800; 2) literature after 1800. The separate examinations are to be taken in 
the course of the student's program, preferably before the last quarter. At 
least one of the tests in literature will include a question concerning 
bibliographical and research procedures. The student must pass all three 
examinations in order to receive his degree. After two unsuccessful 

74 



attempts at any one part of the examination, a student may not apply to 
repeat that section fro at least two quarters during which he may do guided 
study to take recommended courses in order to make up his deficiencies. In 
light of the comprehensive requirements, the student is strongly urged to 
take an additional course in linguistics. Except for the stipulation that he 
must wait at least two quarters if he fails any examination twice, there is no 
limit on the number of times that a student may take an examination. 
Examination results are designated S or U. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date and time of the examination and the composition of the committee. 
The result of the examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate 
Studies within seven days after the examination. 

Graduate Courses in English 

Regular admission status is prerequisite to enrollment in any graduate 
course in English. 

ENGLISH 500. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours credit). ASC. 

ENGLISH 503. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours credit). SSC. 

ENGLISH 620. Practical Criticism I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Composition and literary theory will constitute the basis for practical 
criticism of literary works. The relationship between literary theory and 
problems of teaching composition and literary interpretation will be 
explored, and various contexts (i.e., formalistic, socio-historical, 
archetypal) for interpreting the work of literature will be examined. 
Course requirements will include oral and written analysis of literary 
works written before 1800, selected primarily from the Graduate English 
reading list. 

ENGLISH 621. Practical Criticism II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Course description is the same as ENG 620 above, but utilizes literary 
works written after 1800, selected primarily from the graduate English 
reading list. 

ENGLISH 622. Approaches to Language. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A survey of the components of language study as well as the various 
approaches to language, meaning, and syntax. Relationships between the 
teacher's language study and classroom implementation of various facets 
of it will be explored. 

ENGLISH 625. Chaucer. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 626. Shakespeare. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 627. Milton. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 627. Milton. (5-0-5). ASC. 

75 



ENGLISH 630. American Literature to 1840. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 631. American Literature, 1840-1912. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 640. British Literature, Before 1660. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 641. British Literature, 1660-1830. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 642. British Literature, 1830-1912. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 650. British and American Literature, 1912 to the Present. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 660. Studies in Ethnic Literature. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 662. Literature: Its Intellectual Backgrounds. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

ENGLISH 664. Studies in Comparatieve Literature. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 665. Discriptive Linguistics and Transformational 
Grammar. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the English sound system, the system of word composition 
and transformational syntax. 

ENGLISH 666. Historical Linguistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 690. Special Studies: Independent Study or Seminar (1 to 5 
hours credit). ASC. 

ENGLISH 691. Special Studies: Inependent Study or Seminar. (1 to 5 
hours credit). SSC. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FACULTY 

Dr. Isaiah Mclver, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Roger Warlick, 
Department Head, (ASC). 

History 

Dr. Dean, (SSC); Dr. Duncan, (ASC); Dr. Gross, (ASC); Dr. Lanier, 
(ASC); Dr. Patterson, (ASC); Dr. Simpson, (SSC); and Dr. Smith, (SSC). 

Political Science 

Dr. Byers, (SSC); Dr. Clark, (ASC); Dr. Coyle, (ASC); Dr. Harris, 
(SSC); Dr. McCarthy, (ASC); Dr. Newman, (ASC); Dr. Rhee, (ASC); and 
Dr. Walton, (SSC). 

Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 

Master of Education in History 

and in Political Science 



Coordinator — 1978, Dr. Isaiah Mclver 
76 






OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate programs in history and in political 
science are: 

1. To increase the academic and professional skills, the competence and 
the enthusiasm of secondary teachers in history and political science 
and in social studies generally. 

2. To increase the teacher's knowledge and understanding of the nature 
and conditions of learning and the learner, at the same time making 
the teacher aware of the major features and problems of secondary 
education in the American social order. 

3. To accomplish these objectives by working jointly in a situation 
reflective of the racial and social make-up of American society and, in 
so doing, to provide a context in which teachers themselves may 
develop personally as well as academically. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in history or in political science 
must satisfy all general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program, including the requirement that the GRE Aptitude or 
NTE Common, and an appropriate advanced or area test, be completed 
prior to full admission. The results of these examinations will then serve as 
a basis for academic advisement. 

Students must also satisfy a prerequisite of 15 quarter hours of 
undergraduate work in the major discipline before any course in that 
discipline can be taken for graduate credit. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Students who have earned graduate credits at one or more accredited 
institutions may, under certain circumstances, transfer a limited number 
of quarter hours of such credits to be applied toward the M.Ed, degree 
programs in history and political science. Such transfer of credits is 
handled on an individual basis and requires the written approval of the 
student's adviser and the Coordinator. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the program in either history or political 
science, each student should contact the Coordinator to secure an adviser. 
As soon as he is notified of his assigned adviser, the student should arrange 
for a conference with his adviser and begin planning his degree program. 
Failure by the student to consult regularly with his adviser may greatly 
lengthen the time necessary to complete the program. Each student should 
feel free to consult his adviser as often as is necessary. 



77 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

A. Major in History. 

The typical history program for those students already holding a T-4 certificate in an 
appropriate field is outlined below: 

Quarter Hours 

Minimum 

I. History Courses 30 

II. Professional Education Courses 15 

EDN 622-Nature and Conditions of Human Learning, (SSC) 

or 
EDN 631-Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

and 
EDN 641-Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

and 
EDN 761-Educational Research (ASC) 

III. Approved Electives 15 

An appropriate course in exceptional children(e.g., EXC 522) 

must be taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 

B. Major in Political Science. 

The typical political science program for those students already holding a T-4 certificate in 
an appropriate field is outlined below: 

I. Political Science Courses 30 

These courses must include 5 hours in each of the following areas: 

A. American government and public policy. 

b. Comparative politics. 

c. International relations and foreign policy. 

d. Political theory. 

II. Professional Education Courses 15 

Same as Professional Education courses for History. 
EDN 622 or EDN 631 and EDN 641, and EDN 671 

III. Approved Electives 15 

Appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) 

must be taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 

C. Special program (for students without T-4 certification). Students without prior 
certification may need 70-80 hours to complete the M.Ed, program in either History of 
Political Science. An illustrative program is shown below, but the student will need 
individual guidance. 

I. Professional Education 40 

a. Foundations Courses 10 

EDN 611, EDN 622, EDN 631 

b. Methods and Curriculum 10 

EDN 641 and others 

c. Educational Research - EDN 671 5 

d. Student teaching or equivalent on-the-job 

experience - workshops, etc 10 

e. Electives 5 



78 



II. History or Political Science Courses 80 

See section below on "Use of Electives" for further information on hours in the major 
field. 

D. General Requirements. 

Use of Electives 

The flexibility provided by the 15 hours of "Aproved Electives" normally makes it posible 
to meet the other program guidelines within a 60-hour total. But, students should be 
aware, for example, that counting both graduate and undergraduate classwork, they are 
required to have a total of at least 30 hours in their major teaching area (i,e. , American or 
European History, or American Government). There may also be areas where under- 
graduate preparation was weak or unavailable, such as professional education, non- 
western traditions, etc. Such problems can best be solved on an individual basis with the 
help of the faculty adviser. 

Students should be aware that regardless of their major, state certification criteria 
recommend that social studies teachers include in their programs preparation in the 
following: American history and government, conflicting ideologies, the modern world, 
Western heritage, and non- Western traditions. 

E. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one half of their 
required courses and one half of their elective courses at each of the two colleges. 

Each College offers an almost equal number of courses every quarter. Courses to be 
offered at the two Colleges during the 1976-1977 and 1977-1978 academic years are listed 
below. Other courses are authorized in the curriculum and are listed in the following 
sections on graduate courses in history and in political science. These courses may be 
offered on demand. 





History 


Courses 


Savannah State College 




Armstrong State Coll 


517 HIS 609 HIS 681 




HIS 500 HIS 535 HIS 641 


531 HIS 621 HIS 695 




HIS 514 HIS 619 HIS 662 


534 HIS 640 HIS 669 




HIS 515 HIS 633 HIS 690 


547 HIS 680 HIS 690 




HIS 516 


606 







Political Science Courses 



Savannah State College 
POS600 POS624 POS 683 
POS608 POS 625 POS 684 
POS 610 POS 635 POS 690 
POS 616 POS 680 



Armstrong State College 
POS 511 POS 546 POS 620 
POS 535 POS 605 POS 626 
POS 540 POS 606 POS 691 



A guide to the location of the Education courses is in the Education Section of this 
Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

An integral part of the graduate experience is the achievement of a 
comprehensive understanding of the analytical skills and of the current 
state of jnowledge and scholarship absic to one's field. It is the purpose of 



79 



the Comprehensive Examination both to demonstrate this understanding 
and toaid in further synthesizing its many aspects. Thus, the examination 
itself should be in part a new experience, producing new insights and not 
merely a rehearsal of previous ones. 

Satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations, written 
and/or oral, will thus be required of all degree candidates. Candidates 
should notify their major professor and the Corrdinator of the program of 
their readiness to be examined at the time they apply for the degree - i.e. , 
no later than mid-term of their next-to-final quarter. At this time the 
specific fields and reading list to be covered will be defined, the make-up of 
the examining committee determined, and the date of the exam set. The 
examination normally occurs before mid-term of the student's final 
quarter. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date, and time of the examination and the composition of the Committee. 
The result of the examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate 
Studies within three days after the examination. 

The Coordinator will notify the student regarding the result of the 
examinations. The examination papers and/or comments of the examining 
committee will become part of the student's permanent file in the 
Department, and the student may request a conference with his major 
professor and advisers for the purpose of reviewing the examination 
papers. 

A student may repeat the Comprehensive Examinations as many times 
as necessary to demonstrate the required level of competence. 

Graduate Courses in History 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is the 
general prerequisite that a student must have completed the equivalent 
of 15 hours of undergraduate work in history to become eligible to take 
graduate work for credit toward the Master of Education degree in 
History. 

HISTORY 500. Historical Method. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research; treats 
problems of investigation, organization, and writing through discussion 
and actual research experience in local history. 

HISTORY 501. Seminar in Georgia History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A research seminar dealing with various aspects of Georgia's past with 
emphasis on original research and writing. 



HISTORY 502. United States: Colonial and Revolutionary. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 



80 






A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement and 
growth of the English colonies of North America, the American triumph 
over France in the New World, the drastic change in British colonial 
policy and the rise of American opposition to it, the achievement of 
independence and the establishment of the United States under the 
Constitution. 

HISTORY 505. United States: 1914 to Present. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Covering the most recent period in U.S. History, the course em- 
phasizes political, economic, and social issues. 

HISTORY 514. United States: Diplomatic History I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from 
colonial times through the Civil War. 

HISTORY 515. United States: Diplomatic History II. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A continuation of History 514 to the present. 

HISTORY 516. United States: constitutional History. (5-0-5). ASC. 
A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution of the 
United States. 

HISTORY 517. Reform Movements in American History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A research and readings course designed to acquaint the student with 
the dynamics of American reformism. 

HISTORY 531. History of Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A survey of the social, cultural, economic, political, religious, and 
intellectual history of Latin America from colonial times to present. 

HISTORY 532. The Russian Revolution. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes for 
the collapse of Tsarism, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the Bolshevik 
victory in the Russian Civil War. 

HISTORY 534. Contemporary Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Twentieth century influences that are producing socio-economic unrest 
in much of Latin America. 

HISTORY 535. History of Soviet Foreign Policy. (5-0-5) ASC. 

The course reviews historically the development of Soviet Foreign 
policy with West European States, notably Germany, and also with the 
non-European world through 1917-1940, World War II. and Cold War 
phases. Special attention will be given in this last phase to U.S. - Soviet 
rivalry, Soviet relations with other communist states in Eastern Europe, 
China, and with the Third World, and to the recent moves toward 
detente. 

HISTORY 547. The French Revolution. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
France, with emphasis on the impact of the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon upon the major European nations. 

81 



HISTORY 602. United States: Tyler to Lincoln. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An intensive investigation of the social, economic, political, and 
intellectual investigation of the social, economic, political, and intellectual 
conditions in the United States between 1840 and 1860. 

HISTORY 603. United States: Nineteenth Century Politics. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A research seminar in the course and deelopment of political movements 
in the United States during the Middle Period. 

HISTORY 606. United States: Afro-American History I. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A seminar on the history of ideas, culture ideologies, and institutions 
that influenced Afro-Americans from the colonial period to 1860. 

HISTORY 607. United States: Afro-Armerican History II. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A seminar in Afro-American thought and institutions - a continuation of 
History 606. The course critically evaluates Afro- American culture during 
and following the civil war. 

HISTORY 609. History of Afro-American Higher Education. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

The history of Afro- American higher education from the 19th century to 
the present with emphasis on method and philosophy. 

HISTORY 610. United States: Economic History I. (5-0-5). SSC. 
The history, economic ideas, ideologies, practices, and institutions that 
have influenced Americans from the colonial period to 1860. 

HISTORY 611. United States: Economic History II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Post-1860 American economic history and institutions that have 
influenced Americans from the Civil War to the present. A continuation of 
History 610. 

HISTORY 613. Seminar in the Puritan Ethic. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the evolution and secularization of the Puritan ethic in 
American society. Special emphasis will be given to the theorists who 
created the ethic and to those thinkers who have attempted to humanize it. 

HISTORY 617. Seminar in Pre-1860 Euro-American Reform 
Movements. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Problems in Euro-American cultural, religious, intellectual, and 
institutional development with special emphasis on cultural nationalism, 
naturalism, Darwinism, romanticism, and humanitarianism. 

HISTORY 619. Studies in American Thought. (5-0-5). ASC. 
A reading and research course devoted to the examination of topics in 
the history of American thought. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 



82 









HISTORY 621. Far East in Modern Times. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The strategic economic, political, and ideological factors that shape the 
destinies of Far Eastern countries will be critically examined. The political 
actions of the dominant powers of the East, Japan, communist China, and 
India, will be studied as well as those of the lesser nations, such as 
Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Afghanistan, 
Cambodia, Laos, and the Vietnams. The interplay of the United States and 
Europe with respect to the economic and political issues affecting the Far 
East w r ill be high-lighted. 

HISTORY 633. Topics in Modern Russian History. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Selected topics in 19th and 20th Century Russian intellectural, political, 
economic, and social history. 

HISTORY 636. European Diplomatic History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An intensive study into the origins and development of European 
diplomacy, the instruments of power, the interrelationship of diplomacy 
and military forces, the limits of national power, economic objectives, and 
the fundamentals of national objectives. Europe's special political and 
military role will be examined, as it applies to Great Britain, France, 
Germany, Russia, Austria, and Spain. The special inpingements of 
American diplomacy on European national interest will be studied, in 
complement with such internation institutions as the League of Nations, 
United Nations, Common Market, and NATO. 

HISTORY 640. England: Tudor-Stuart Topics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional, and 
religious issues of English history, 1485-1660. Class concentration will be 
directed to selected topics or periods which will be augmented by 
independent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 641. England: Restoration-Hanoverian Topics. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional and 
religious issues of English history, 1660-1815. Class concentration will be 
directed to selected topics or periods which will be augmented by 
independent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 645. Studies in Early Modern Europe. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Selected topics in XVI and XVII century European life will be studied, 
e.g., the religious controversies, geographical expansion and the scientific 
revolution. Heavy emphasis will be given independent research and 
presentations by the student. 

HISTORY 650. Topics in Modern European History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with emphasis 
upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World Wars. 



83 



HISTORY 680. Readings in American History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

HISTORY 681. Readings in European History. (5-0-5). SSC. 

HISTORY 690. Independent Study. (Credit varies). SSC. 
Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 691. Independent Study. (Credit varies). ASC. 
Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 695. American Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An extensive survey of the historiographical trends evident in the 
writing of American History with emphasis on major interpretations and 
the influence of major historians. 

HISTORY 696. European Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lectures and readings to itllustrate the major developments in the study 
of the European past. 

Graduate Courses in Political Science 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is the 
general requirement that a student must have completed the equivalent of 
15 hours of undergraduate work in Political Science to become eligible to 
take graduate work for credit toward the Master of Education degree in 
Political Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 511. American Presidency. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the Presidency, with the 
principal emphasis on the relations of the executive branch with the 
Congress and the Court system. Some attention will be given to the 
evolution of the Presidency to its present dominant position in the 
American political process. (Completion of a survey course in American 
History is desirable.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 530. Seminar in Empirical Political Thought. 
(5-0-5). ASC, 

A course primarily of readings centered on the analysis of the 
epistemological and methodological foundations of contemporary politicial 
and social science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 535. Origins of Totalitarianism. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An analysis of the socio-psychological bases of modern totalitarian 
movements. Major emphasis will be placed on pre-World War II Nazi 
Germany. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 540. Comparative Political Analysis. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

This course is mainly theoretical. It deals with the various approaches, 
concepts, and methodologies that are being used in the analysis of 
comparative politics, viz: the traditional aproach (formal-legal), group 



84 



theory of politics, systems analysis, structural-functional analysis, 
communications theory, decision-making theory, game theory, etc. At the 
same time, each approach is examined as it is used in comparing the politics 
of various countries. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 546. Far Eastern Government and Politics. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Description and comparative analysis of the political systems of Com- 
munist China and Japan. Special attention is given to historical develop- 
ment, political institutions and processes, political culture, political 
socialization, and contemporary problems. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 600. Research Methods in Political Science. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course covers the different methodological approaches to political 
data, data gathering, and data analysis. It also gives an overview of the 
philosophy of science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 603. Public Policy. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Here an analysis is made of the way public policy is made, who influences 
it, and the varied techniques Political Scientist have developed to study it. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 604. Principles of Public Administration. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is to acquaint the student with the chief concepts, theories, 
ideas and models in Public Administration. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 605. State Government. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A comparative study of the structure, function and political process of 
state, county and other special government units in the United States. 
Special emphasis will be given to the states of Georgia, Florida, and South 
Carolina. Field studies will be utilized to gain first-hand knowledge 
whenever possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 606. Urban Government. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the structure, function, and political processes of city and 
other local governments in the United States. Special attention will be 
given to the workings of city government in the state of Georgia in general 
and to the cities in the Savannah area in particular. Field studies will be 
utilized to gain first-hand knowledge whenever possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 608. Urban Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course surveys the theories, the approaches, models, and the 
techniques of political activity in the urban metro areas. In addition, it also 
reviews the proposals and solutions for urban reform. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 610. American Political Parties. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A seminar which will consider the structural-functional nomenclature of 
American political parties as well as make analytical inquiry into their 
growth, development, aims, and primary concerns. 

85 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 615. American Supreme Court. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A seminar analyzing the key problems and issues in the judicial process: 
judicial behavior, judicial policy making, judicial biography, and the court 
in the political process. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 616. Black Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An analysis is made in this course of the areas of specialization in Black 
politics as well as the numerous political activities in the Black community. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 619. American Foreign Policy. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course will span the period from the American Revolution to the 
Vietnamese War. Areas of major interest will be America's early isolation, 
its emergence as an International power, participation in major wars, and 
as a primary force in the United Nations. The course will examine the 
relationship of the United States with the USSR, United Kingdom, 
Mainland China, and other world powers. This study will show the 
supporting roles of the U.S. Military, the CIA, AID, USIA, Peace Corps, 
and other agencies. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 620. Topics in International Relations. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Prerequisite: undergraduate work in the field or permission of the 
instructor. A seminar course with specific titles announced as offered. May 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 621. International Relations: Far East. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The politics, people, movements and ideologies are surveyed for the 
impact on Asia and the world. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 623. International Relations: Africa. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

The diplomacy, alliances and internal politics of the Black African 
countries are analyzed and studied for trends and continuities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 624. USSR and Red China in Conflict. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 

This course will consider and evaluate Chinese and Russian relations 
before and after the 1917 Communist Revolution. The causes of 
Sino-Soviet conflicts will be traced to their economic, political, strategic, as 
well as ideologue, will be compared with the political, strategic, as welll as 
ideological sources. The history of the break between the Soviet Union and 
the Peoples Republic of China and the implication of this hiatus for the 
security of the modern world will be critically exmined. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 625. Communist China in World Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course stresses the international role of the Peoples Republic of 
China. The growth of China's Communist element is traced first through 



86 






its tenuous relationship with Nationalist China and then as the successor to 
Nanking. Particular emphasis is given to the changing relations of Red 
China to the USSR, the United States, Japan, and the devloping nations of 
Africa, Asia, and the Middle. East. Communist China's interest in world 
revolution, cultural programs, and insurgencies are examined against its 
break with and distrust of the Soviet Union. Reasons are explored for the 
detente of China with the United States. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 626. Seminar in International Law. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A detailed study of selected topics within the field of International Law. 
emphasis will be on wide reading, written reports and classroom discussion 
and analysis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 627. International Organizations. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

This course will analyze the roles and internal sturctures of the United 
Nations, the Common Market, NATO, the International Court, the 
Orgnaization of American States, the World Bank, and other international 
organizations. Of special interest will be the particular influence of the 
United States in these organizations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 628. Communism, Capitalism, and 
Christianity. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is a study of the origins of Communism, Capitalism, and 
Christianity and their interrelationship in the modern world. Students will 
explore the similarities and differences of the three factors in Europe, 
Asia, Africa, and America. The effects of these forces will be studied as 
they impinged on various countries and on such dominant personalities as 
Joseph Stalin, Woodrow Wilson, Sun Yat Sen, De Gaulle, Francisco 
Franco, and John D. Rockefeller. Of special interest in this study will be 
such periods of intense Communist-Capitalistic relationship as the 
Post- World War I period, the epoch of Nazism, the "Cold War," and the 
Russo-American Detente. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 629. Contemporary Problems in 
International Relations. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis of the major areas of conflict - or cooperation - in the 
international areana is made to highlight trends, patterns and continuities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 630. World Ideological Movements. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

An analysis of the major ideological movements conditioning the mind of 
contemporary many. The course will focus primarily on democratic 
capitalism, fascism, socialism, and communism. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 635. Plack Political Thought. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A study of the major thinkers in the Black community and the effects of 
their ideas on the concepts of freedom, liberalism, conservtism, state, 



87 



obligation, consent, etc., for the purpose of its intellectual value and 
comparative possibilities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 642. Latin American Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A survey of the key Latin American countries and their politics is made 
for insight, comparison, and prospects. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 649. Revolutions and Revolutionaries. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

This course addresses itself to the causes and characteristics of 
revolutions, from the American Revolution to the recent social revolution 
of Blacks, women, and minorities. Each major revolution selected will be 
examined concerning the basic reasons for the upheaval, the leadership, 
and the benefits and losses incurred by the revolt. The course will 
specificlly treat the French Revolution, the revolutions of 1848, the 
Risorgimento, the Meiji Restoration, overthrow of the Ching Dynasty, 
Jose Rizal and the Philippines, the Irish problem, Kenyatta and the Mau 
Mau and other revolutions. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 680. Readings in American Government. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 681. Readings in American Political Thought. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 683. Readings in Political Theory. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

POLITICAL SCJENCE 684. Readings in Comparative Politics. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 690/691. Independent Study.(Credit varies). 
ASC and SSC. 

Admission by approval of the instructor and the Departmental 
Coordinator. 

MATHEMATICS 

FACULTY 

Mr. J.B. Clemmons, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Richard M. Sum- 
merville, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Chi, (ASC); Dr. Englhardt, 
(SSC); Dr. Etersque, (ASC); Dr. Hansen, (ASC); Dr. Hinkel, (ASC); Dr. 
A. Houston, (SSC); Dr. S. Hudson, (SSC); Dr. Kilhefner, (ASC); Dr. 
Laska, (ASC); Dr. Munson, (ASC); Dr. Netherton, (ASC); and Dr. 
Shipley, (ASC). 

This program being deactivated in 1977 
Coordinator - 1978, Mr. J.B. Clemmons 



88 



OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Mathematics of the Joint Graduate Studies Prog- 
ram, in cooperation with the Department of Education, offers a program of 
study leading to the degree of Master of Education. The objectives of this 
program are: 

1. To enhance the academic and professional competence of mathema- 
tics teachers in secondary schools - at both the junior and senior high 
school levels: 

2. To develop the skills, confidence, and understanding that such 
teachers need in order to meet the present scientific and technologi- 
cal challenges of modern society; 

3. To acquaint secondary mathematics teachers with the various major 
braches of mathematics which are active in contemporary research 
and relevant to the various modern secondary mathematics curricula; 
and 

4. To familiarize teachers of mathematics with those persons who have 
contributed significantly to the field, as well as with prominent 
mathematicians and educators currently working in the area of im- 
proving the teaching and understanding of the subject. 

In addition to its own degree program, the department also offers 
coursework designed to support the other graduate degree programs of 
the Joint Graduate Studies Program and to meet the needs of all graduate 
students in the areas of mathematics, mathematical physics, mathematics 
education, statistics, and computer science. 

Admission: Program being deactivated; no 
admissions will be processed. 

Students entering the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics must 
satisfy the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies 
Program, including the requirements related to either the "common" part 
of the National Teachers Examination (NTE) or the "aptitude" part of the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE). In addition, the mathematics 
"area" part of the NTE must be taken prior to admission as a degree- 
seeking student. Students must make a scaled score of 600 on this "area" 
test for Regular Admission; no minimum score is required for Provisional 
Admission. 

Subsequent to his admission, but prior to enrolling in his first mathema- 
tics course (which, ordinarily, is Mathematics 501), each student must take 
the Graduate Mathematics Diagnostic Test (GMDT). The GMDT has the 
purpose of allowing some students to exempt Mathematics 501 upon scor- 
ing at a very high level. However, if a sufficiently low score is made on the 
GMDT, the student is not allowed to take Mathematics 501 until he meets 
requirements set for him by the Examinations Committee of the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics Faculty. These requirements normally consist of 

89 



satisfactory preformance in appropriate undergraduate course(s) and/or 
on subsequent re-examination. The GMDT is not required of students in 
order to take Mathematics/Education 592 or Mathematics 594. 

Each entering student should contact the Mathematics Coordinator of 
the Joint Graduate Studies Program as early as possible for details con- 
cerning the GMDT and should arrange with the Coordinator to take the 
GMDT at its first administration after his admission to the program. 
Failure to do so can result in severely retarding the student's academic 
progress. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the M.Ed, degree program in mathema- 
tics, each student will be assigned both an academic adviser and a profes- 
sional adviser. The former will be a member of the Joint Graduate 
Mathematics Faculty, and the latter a member of the Joint Graduate 
Education Faculty. As soon as he is notified of this assignment, the student 
should arrange for a conference with each of his advisers and begin plan- 
ning his entire degree program under their guidance. A copy of the stu- 
dent's proposed program is to be placed on file in each of the Graduate 
Dean's offices. The student will find that his advisers can provide him with 
the kind of counsel and information which will make possible realistic 
planning, informed and personalized judgments, and, hence, a maximally 
valuable graduate education. Each student should feel free to consult with 
his advisers as often as is necessary and should plan to have a least one 
conference per quarter with each. 

TRANSFER OR CREDIT 

All student requests for transfer of graduate mathematics credit will be 
evaluated by the Transfer Credit committee of the Joint Graduate 
Mathematics Faculty. A formal student request should include a list of the 
courses to be considered, a list of the texts used for each course, and a 
catalogue containing a description of each course. 

In reaching a decision the committee will adhere to the philosophy that 
the transfer of graduate credit is a privilege to be granted only when there 
is no doubt that the course under consideration is comparable in quality and 
content to one in the Joint Mathematics Graduate Program. To properly 
determine these factors, the committee may at its option (a) request a 
personal interview with the student to discuss course content and/or (b) 
require a written examination to test the student's mastery of this conten. 

Transfer credit is also subject to the following regulations: 

1. Each course must have been taken in an accredited graduate 
program. 

2. Each course grade must be B or better. 



90 



3. Each credit must have been earned within the past five years. 

4. A maximum often (10) quarter hours of transfer credit in mathema- 
tics may be applied to a degree. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete a sequence of courses which conforms to the following require- 
ments: 

I. Education Courses (15 quarter hours): To include Education 641 and 671 and one of the 
following: Education 621, 622, or 631. 

II. Mathematics Courses (35 quarter hours): To include Mathematics 501, 502, 505, 510, 530, 
and 10 quarter hours of approved courses chosen from the following courses: Mathema- 
tics 605, 610, 615, 620, 630, 635, 640, 655, 660, 670, 691, and 692. It is strongly 
recommended that 501, 502, 505, 510 and 530 be completed before taking other courses. 

III. Elective Courses (10 quarter hours): To be taken in Mathematics, Education or a 
suitable third field with the prior approval of the student's advisers. (Since a course in 
exceptional children is required for certification, students should take EXC 522 if they 
have not had an appropriate course previously.) 

IV. Balance of Courses. Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking 
one-half of their courses at each College. A guide to the location of the mathematics 
courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

MATH 501 MATH 640 MATH 502 MATH 615 

MATH 505 MATH 655 MATH 510 MATH 620 

MATH 594 MATH 670 MATH 530 MATH 630 

MATH 605 MATH 691 MATH 592 MATH 660 

MATH 563 MATH 610 MATH 692 

A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the Education Department of 
this Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Certain courses in the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics are desig- 
nated as "core" courses because they contain many of the concepts most 
basic and useful to a teacher in junior or senior high school. The core 
courses are Mathematics 501, 502, 505, 510, and 530. 

An integral part of the graduate program is the attainment of the kind of 
comprehensive understanding of these concepts which can be achieved by 
their re-examination in the light of experience and insight obtained from 
the completion of the courses in the program. The mathematics graduate 
faculty also considers that the crystallization of knowledge to be gained 
from remastering fundamental topics with the benefit of a broadened 
viewpoint is of great value. 

Accordingly, each recipient of the Master of Education degree in 
Mathematics is required to have successfully demonstrated the attainment 
of such knowledge and such understanding on a written comprehensive 



91 



examination. The following regulations govern the administration of the 
comprehensive examination in mathematics. 

1. Comprehensive Examinations will be held during the Fall and Spring 
Quarters, on the third Monday of November and April, respectively. 
The coordinator shall notify the students and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies, at least ten days prior to the examination, concerning the 
palce and time of day of the examination. 

2. Students must register with the Mathematics Coordinator stating 
their intention to take the Comprehensive Examination. The dead- 
line for registering for the Comprehensive Examination is two 
months before the date of the Examination. The registering students 
will receive within one week of this deadline the list of topics for which 
they will be responsible on the examination. 

3. The Examinations Committee of the Joint Graduate Mathematics 
Faculty will be responsible for constructing exams, administering 
them, grading them, and making recommendations to the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics faculty concerning success or failure on the 
examinations. The Joint Graduate Mathematics Faculty shall make 
the final decision on success or failure. The result of the examination 
will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within seven 
days after the examination. 

4. The Mathematics Coordinator will notify the examined students on 
the results of the Comprehensive Exams. The examined students 
may request a conference with their faculty advisers for the purpose 
of discussing and reviewing the examination papers. The examina- 
tion papers will remain in the advisement files of the student 
advisers until the end of the subsequent quarter. 

5. Students may repeat the Comprehansive Examination as many 
times as they find necessary to demonstrate the required level of 
compentence. 

Graduate Courses in Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS 501. Calculus for Graduate Students. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Prerequisite: Students must pass the Graduate Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test prior to enrolling. 

A review of the fundamental concepts and applications of analytic 
geometry and the differential and integral calculus of one and several 
variables. (May be exempted by examination.) 

MATHEMATICS 502. Foundations of Mathematics. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 501. 

An intensive examination of the fundamental ideas of modern axiomatic 
mathematics. Special attention is given to elementary logic, sets, rela- 
tions, functions, and a systematic construction of the real number system. 

92 



MATHEMATICS 505. Analysis I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
502. SSC. 

A careful re-examination of the elements of differential and integral 
calculus; limits, continuity, the derivative, implicit functions, inverse func- 
tions, the indefinite and definite integral, the fundamental theorem of 
calculus; applications in science and technology. 

MATHEMATICS 510. Algebra I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
502. ASC. 

A brief survey of abstract and linear algebra, including topics from 
group theory, vector spaces and matrices. 

MATHEMATICS 530. Geometry I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
502. ASC. 

A transformation approach to the study of Euclidean, hyperbolic and 
elliptic geometry; together with its application in secondary school cur- 
riculum. 

MATHEMATICS/EDUCATION 592. Modern Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. (Does not require the GMDT.) 

Content concentration emphasizing the rigor, mathematical language, 
and subject matter to be taught in the elemtary shcool. 

MATHEMATICS 594. Statistics for Education and the Social Sci- 
ences. (5-0-5). SSC. (Does not require the GMDT.) 

Graphic representation and data reduction; measures of central ten- 
dency and variability; distributions; correlation; regression; hypothesis 
testing. Primary emphasis is upon the development of statistical skills 
necessary for the conduct and interpretation of statistical research. 

MATHEMATICS 605. Analysis II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
505. SSC. 

A continuation of Analysis I; Taylor's theorem, infinite series, power 
series, improper integrals, multiple integrals; applications in science and 
technology. 

MATHEMATICS 610. Algebra II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
510. ASC. 
A continuation of Algebra I with topics from groups, rings, and fields. 

MATHEMATICS 615. Number Theory. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 502. ASC. 

Topics from number theory including divisibility, congruences, 
Diophantine problems, nuber-theoretic functions, classical construction 
problems. 

MATHEMATICS 620. Probability and Mathematical Statistics. (5-0- 
5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 505. ASC. 

The basic concepts of probability and statistics. Random experiment, 



93 



event space, probability, random variable, conditional probability, inde- 
pendence, basic distributions, limit theorems, sampling, estimation, tests 
of hypotheses. 

MATHEMATICS 630. Gemoetry II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathema- 
tics 530. ASC. 

A continuation of Geometry I including a study of similarities leading to 
some classical theorems of geometry. 

MATHEMATICS 635. Topology. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
502. SSC. 

The basic concepts of topology; topological spaces, continuous functions, 
homeomorphisms, quotients, products, connectedness, compactness, sep- 
aration axioms, metrizability. 

MATHEMATICS 640. Applied Analysis and Mathematical Physics. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 505. SSC. 

Formulation of equations from scientific and technological principles and 
the solution of these equations. Problems will be chosen from the physical 
and biological sciences, from engineering and from business and 
economics. 

MATHEMATICS 655. Computer Science and Numerical Methods. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

Topics in computer science and numerical methods, to include various 
applications of computing in mathematics and data processing. 

MATHEMATICS 660. Mathematical Logic. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 502. ASC. 

Topics include symbolization of sentences, and the propositional and 
first order predicate calculi (including the completeness theorems). If time 
permits, cardinal and ordinal numbers will be discussed. 

MATHEMATICS 670. History and Philosohy of Mathematics. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

A survey of the development of mathematics and a study of formalism, 
intuitionism, and logicism. 

MATHEMATICS 691. Topics in Mthematics for the Jinior High School 
I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 502. SSC. 

A detailed examination of the content of various modern programs in 
mathematics for the junior high school. Special attention is given to a 
development of the theoretical foundations underlying such content and to 
the relevance of the content in other areas of a student's education. 

MATHEMATICS 692. Topics in Mathematics for the Junior High 
School II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 691. ASC. 

A survey of topics from finite mathematics including combinations, 
permutations, probability and statistics. The computer will be used as a 
tool for solving problems in these areas. 

94 



MATHEMATICS 698. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours). ASC. Offerd by 
secial arrangement. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and permission 
of the department head. SSC. 

Individual reading and research under the direction of a member of the 
graudate mathematics faculty. The topics will consist of material not 
normally covered in the regular course offerings. 

MATHEMATICS 699. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours). SSC. Offered by 
Special arrangement. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and permis- 
sion of the department head. SSC. 

Individual reading and research under the direction of a member of the 
graudate mathematics faculty. The topics will consist of material not 
normally covered in the regular course offerings. 



95 



INDEX 

Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Standing 29 

Adding Courses 29 

Administrative Officers 8 

Admissions, General Requirements 20 

Procedures 24 

Types of 21 

Advisement 25 

Balance of Course 32 

Biology, Graduate Courses in 50 

M. Ed. Degree in 48 

Board of Regents, Members of 6 

Staff of 6 

Business Administation, Graduate Courses in 40 

Master's Degree in 36 

Business Education, Graduate Courses in 46 

M.Ed. Degree in 42 

Candidacy for Degree 32 

CATES Courses 30 

Chemistry, Graduate Courses in 56 

M.Ed. Degree in 54 

Class Regulations 27 

Comprehensive Examination, Requirement for Degree 33 

Course Load 29 

Degree requirements, Summary 33 

Degrees Offered 31 

Dropping Courses 29 

Education, Graduate Gourses in 65 

Programs in 58 

Elementray Education, M.Ed. Degree in 59 

English, Graduate Courses in 75 

M.Ed. Degree in 72 

Exceptional Children, Degree Program in 62 

Graduate Courses in 70 

Faculty 10 

Fees 17 

Financial Assistance 19 



96 



Grades 27 

Graduate Council 9 

Graduate courses, Identification of 27 

Graduate Departments, Heads of 8 

Graduate Program coordinators 35 

Graduation, Application for 33 

History, Graduate Courses in 80 

M.Ed. Degree in 76 

History of Joint Graduate Studies Program 15 

Housing 18 

Joint Graduate Studies Program, 

Administration of 16 

History of 15 

Organization of 16 

Purpose of 15 

Mathematics, Graduate Courses in 92 

M.Ed. Degree in 88 

Political Science, Graudate Courses in 84 

M.Ed. Degree in 76 

Probation 29 

Program of Study Advisement Form 25 

Readmission 23 

Refunds of Fees 18 

Registration 26 

Requirements for Master's Degree, General 31 

Residence Requiremnts for Degree 31 

Residency Requirements Georgia 17 

Special Admission Advisement Form 29 

Special Education, Graduate Courses in 70 

M.Ed. Degree in 62 

Student Responsibilities 25 

Teacher Certification 33 

Time Limitation, Degree Programs 31 

Transfer of Credit 26 

Veterans Benefits 19 

Withdrawal from Classes 29 



97 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



1RADUATE STUDIES 




A 

ssc 
c 



Catalogue and General Bulletin 
Joint Graduate Studies Program 
J'ANNAH STATE COLLEGE and ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 
1978-1979 



CATALOGUE AND GENERAL BULLETIN 

of 

THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

OF 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE— ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Units of the University System of Georgia 

1978-1979 



The statements set forth in this Catalogue are for informational pur- 
poses only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a 
student and this institution. 

While the provisions of this Catalogue will ordinarily be applied as 
stated, Savannah State College and Armstrong State College reserve the 
right to change any provision listed in this Catalogue, including but not 
limited to academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to 
individual students. Every effort will be made to keep students advised of 
any such changes. Information on changes will be available in the Graduate 
Office at Savannah State College and the Graduate Office at Armstrong 
State College. It is especially important that each student note that it is 
his/her responsibility to keep himseh7herself apprised of current gradua- 
tion requirements for his/her particular degree program. 

Armstrong State College and Savannah State College do not discrimi- 
nate on the basis of sex, race, creed, national origin, or disability as 
required by Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972, and the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 
1973. 



CONTENTS 



Academic Calendar 4 

Governing Board and Staff of the 

University System of Georgia 6 

Administrative Officers of the 

Joint Graduate Studies Program 8 

Heads of the Graduate Departments 8 

The Graduate Council 9 

The Graduate Faculty 10 

History, Purpose, and Organization 15 

Fees, Refunds and Financial Assistance 17 

Admission to Graduate Study 20 

Academic Regulations 25 

Degrees and General Degree Requirements 31 

Departments: Programs and Courses 35 

Business Administration 36 

M.B.A. Program 

M.Ed., Business Education 

Biology 48 

M.Ed., Biology 

Chemistry 54 

M.Ed., Chemistry 

Education 58 

M.Ed., Elementary Education 

M.Ed., Early Childhood Education 

M.Ed., Special Education — Behavior Disorders 

English 72 

M.Ed., English 

History and Political Science 76 

M.Ed., History 
M.Ed., Political Science 

Mathematics .90 

M.Ed., Mathematics 

Index 93 



1978 



1979 



SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 



SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 



JANUARY 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011121314 

15161718192021 

22232425262728 

293031 

FEBRUARY 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12131415161718 

19202122232425 

262728 

MARCH 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12131415161718 

19202122232425 

262728293031 

APRIL 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9101112131415 

16171819202122 

23242526272829 

30 

MAY 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 910111213 

14151617181920 

21222324252627 

28293031 

JUNE 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11121314151617 

18192021222324 

252627282930 



JULY 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9101112131415 

16171819202122 
23242526272829 
3031 

AUGUST 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9101112 

13141516171819 

20212223242526 

2728293031 

SEPTEMBER 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10111213141516 
17181920212223 
24252627282930 

OCTOBER 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011121314 

15161718192021 

22232425262728 

293031 

NOVEMBER 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12131415161718 

19202122232425 

2627282930 

DECEMBER 1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10111213141516 
17181920212223 
24252627282930 
31 



JANUARY 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 910111213 
14151617181920 
21222324252627 
28293031 

FEBRUARY 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11121314151617 

18192021222324 

25262728 

MARCH 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11121314151617 

18192021222324 

25262728293031 

APRIL 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011121314 
15161718192021 
22232425262728 
2930 

MAY 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9101112 

13141516171819 

20212223242526 

2728293031 

JUNE 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10111213141516 

17181920212223 

24252627282930 



JULY 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011121314 

15161718192021 

22232425262728 

293031 

AUGUST 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12131415161718 

19202122232425 

262728293031 

SEPTEMBER 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9101112131415 

16171819202122 

23242526272829 

30 

OCTOBER 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 910111213 

14151617181920 

21222324252627 

28293031 

NOVEMBER 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11121314151617 

18192021222324 

252627282930 

DECEMBER 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9101112131415 

16171819202122 

23242526272829 

3031 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1978-1979 



JUNE 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1978 



12 Registration — Monday. 

13 Classes begin — Tuesday. 

16 Last day to register for credit- 



-Friday. 



JULY 



4 Holiday — Tuesday. 

13 Mid-term — Thursday. 

13 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

TBA Preregistration for the Fall Quarter. 



AUGUST 10 Last day of classes— Thursday. 

14-15 Examinations — Monday and Tuesday. 
13 Graduation — with SSC, Sunday. 



FALL QUARTER, 1978 

SEPTEMBER 20 Registration— Wednesday. 

25 Classes begin — Monday. 
29 Last day to register for credit — Friday. 

OCTOBER 27 Mid-term— Friday. 

27 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
TBA Preregistration for Winter Quarter. 

NOVEMBER 23-24 Thanksgiving Holidays (begins at 12:30 P.M. on 
November 23). 

DECEMBER 5 Last day of classes— Tuesday. 

6-7 Examinations — Wednesday and Thursday. 



JANUARY 



WINTER QUARTER, 1979 

2 Registration — Tuesday. 

4 Classes begin — Thursday. 

9 Last day to register for credit — Tuesday. 



FEBRUARY 6 Mid-term— Tuesday. 

6 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
13 Last day to file application for graduation at end 
of Spring Quarter — Tuesday. 
TBA Preregistration for the Spring Quarter. 



MARCH 



13 Last day of classes — Tuesday. 
14-15 Examinations — Wednesday and Thursday. 



MARCH 



SPRING QUARTER, 1979 

22 Registration — Thursday. 
26 Classes begin — Monday. 
30 Last day to register for credit — Friday. 



APRIL 27 Last day to file application for graduation at end 

of Summer Quarter — Friday. 
27 Mid-term— Friday. 

27 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
TBA Preregistration for Summer Quarter. 



MAY 
JUNE 



31 Last day of classes — Thursday. 

4-5 Examinations — Monday and Tuesday. 
3 Graduation — with SSC, Sunday 



JUNE 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1979 

12 Registration — Tuesday. 

13 Classes begin — Wednesday. 

16 Last day to register for credit — Friday. 



JULY 



4 Holiday — Wednesday. 

12 Mid-term — Thursday. 

12 Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 

TBA Preregistration for the Fall Quarter. 



AUGUST 9 Last day of classes— Thursday. 

13-14 Examinations — Monday and Tuesday. 
15 Graduation — with ASC, Wednesday. 



SEPTEMBER 



FALL QUARTER, 1979 

Registration. 

Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit 



OCTOBER 



Last day to withdraw from class with grade of W. 
Mid-term. 



NOVEMBER 22-23 Thanksgiving Holidays (begin at 12:30 P.M. 
on November 22). 
Last day of classes. 



DECEMBER 



Examinations. 

Christmas Vacation begins. 



GOVERNING BOARD, 
ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

MILTON JONES, Chairman Columbus 

ERWIN A. FRIEDMAN, Vice Chairman Savannah 

SCOTT CANDLER, JR Decatur 

RUFUS B. COODY Vienna 

CHARLES A. HARRIS Ocilla 

JESSE HILL, JR Atlanta 

0. TORBITT IVEY, JR Augusta 

JAMES D. MADDOX Rome 

ELRIDGE W. MCMILLAN Atlanta 

CHARLES T. OXFORD Albany 

LAMAR R. PLUNKETT Bowdon 

JOHN H. ROBINSON, III Americus 

P. R. SMITH Winder 

DAVID H. TISINGER Carrollton 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 

STAFF OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR .Chancellor 

JOHN W. HOOPER Vice Chancellor 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretary 

SHEALY E. McCOY Vice Chancellor -Fiscal 

Affairs and Treasurer 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Vice Chancellor -Construction 

and Physical Plant 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor -Research 

M. COY WILLIAMS .Vice Chancellor 

Academic Development 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR Vice Chancellor -Services 

HARRY B. O'REAR Vice Chancellor -Health Affairs 

HASKIN R. POUNDS Assistant Vice Chancellor 

JAMES L. CARMON Assistant Vice Chancellor - 

Computing Systems 

MARY ANN HICKMAN Assistant Vice Chancellor -Personnel 

ROBERT M. JOINER Assistant Vice Chancellor - 

Communications 

HARRY H. MURPHY, JR Director of Public Information 

L. HARLAN DAVIS Director, Interinstitutional Programs 

in International Affairs 



Su 



J 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF 
THE JOINT GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

President 
Clyde Hall (Acting) Henry L. Ashmore 

Vice President 
Thomas Byers (Acting) H. Dean Propst 

Dean for Graduate Studies 
James A. Eaton Joseph V. Adams 

Comptroller 
Prince Mitchell Jule R. Stanfield 

Registrar 
John B. Clemmons George Hunnicutt 

Librarian 
Andrew J. McLemore Gerald Sandy 

HEADS OF THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENTS 

Biology 
Margaret C. Robinson Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. 

Business Administration 
Mary C. Torian Thomas R. Eason 

Chemistry 
Willie G. Tucker Henry E. Harris 

Education 
Thelma M. Harmond William W. Stokes 

English 
Luetta C. Milledge Hugh Pendexter, III 

Mathematics 
John B. Clemmons Richard M. Summerville 

History and Political Science 
Isaiah Mclver Roger K. Warlick 



8 






THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 



During the 1977-1978 academic year, the Graduate Council was reor- 
ganized. Prior to March, 1978, the Council membership included most of 
the administrative officials on the preceding page, including all of the 
department heads listed there, plus seven faculty members, plus two 
graduate students. 

Effective March, 1978, the members of the Graduate Council included 
the presidents and vice presidents as ex-officio, non-voting members, plus 
the following members: 

Graduate Deans: Two Graduate Student: One 

Departmental Representatives: 

Business Administration: Coordinator — Dr. Thomas Eason. 
Elected Faculty: Dr. John Chasse and Dr. Mary Torian. 

Biology: Coordinator — Dr. Margaret Robinson. 

Chemistry: Coordinator — Dr. Henry Harris. 



Education: 
Elected Faculty: 

English: 

History and Political 
Science: 
Elected Faculty: 

Mathematics: 



Coordinator — Dr. Thelma Harmond 

Dr. Adaline Barber, Dr. Jacquelyn Stephens 

and Dr. William Stokes. 

Coordinator — Dr. Hugh Pendexter. 

Coordinator — Dr. Isaiah Mclver 

Dr. Olavi Arens. 

Coordinator — Mr. J. B. Clemmons. 



Effective September, 1978, the members of the Graduate Council will 
include, in addition to the above mentioned ex-officio members, the two 
Graduate Deans, one graduate student plus departmental representatives 
as follows: 

Coordinator — Dr. Mary Torian 

Dr. and Dr. 



Business Administration: 
Two Elected Faculty: 

Biology: 

Chemistry: 

Education: 
Three Elected Faculty: Dr. 

and Dr. 
English: 

History and Political 
Science: 
One Elected Faculty 

Mathematics: 



Coordinator — Dr. Leslie Davenport 

Coordinator — Dr. Willie Tucker 

Coordinator — Dr. William Stokes 
Dr. 

Coordinator — Dr. Luetta Milledge 
Coordinator — Dr. Roger Warlick 

Dr. 



Coordinator — Dr. Richard Summerville 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

JOHN C. ADAMS, Ed.D., Florida State University, Education (SSC) 

JOSEPH V. ADAMS, Ph.D., University of Alabama, Psychology (ASC) 

STEPHEN AGYEKUM, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (SSC) 

EDWARD ALBAN, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Business Adminis- 
tration (ASC) 

HAYWARD ANDERSON, D.B.A., Harvard University, Business Ad- 
ministration (SSC) 

OLAVI ARENS, Ph.D., Columbia University, History (ASC) 

ADELINE Z. BARBER, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 
(ASC) 

JIMMY B. BENSON, Ph.D., Cornell University, Biology (SSC) 

RONALD J. BEUMER, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Biology (ASC) 

SARVAN K. BHATIA, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Business Admin- 
istration (ASC) 

NANCY V. BLAND, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

JOHN BREWER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Chemistry (ASC) 

KENT BROOKS, Ph.D., George Washington University, English (ASC) 

CLIFFORD BURGESS, Ph.D., Auburn University, Education (SSC) 

THOMAS H. BYERS, Ph.D., Ball State University, Political Science 
(SSC) 

JOHN D. CHASSE, Ph.D., Syracuse University, Business Administra- 
tion (SSC) 

C.P.G. CHI, Ph.D., Wayne State University, Mathematics (ASC) 

ROSS L. CLARK, Ph.D., Tulane University, Political Science (ASC) 

JOHN H. COCHRAN, JR., Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 

(SSC) 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, Ph.D., Florida State University, Political Sci- 
ence (ASC) 

OSCAR C. DAUB, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Biology 

(ASC) 

JOHN DUNCAN, Ph.D., Emory University, History (ASC) 



10 



THOMAS R. EASON, Ph.D., University of Mississippi, Business Ad- 
min is t ra t ion (ASC) 

JAMES A. EATON, Ed.D., Columbia University, Education (SSC) 

FRANKIE ELLIS, Ed.D., University of Texas, Education (SSC) 

C. OBI EMEH, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Biology (SSC) 

JACOB ENGELHARDT, Ph.D., New York University, Mathematics 
(SSC) 

STANLEY ETERSQUE, Ed.D., West Virginia University Mathemat- 
ics (ASC) 

IDA J. GADSDEN, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Education 

(SSC) 

JIMMIE F. GROSS, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (ASC) 

LAURENT J. GUILLOU, JR., Ph.D., Louisiana State University, Biol- 
ogy (ASC) 

ORANGE HALL, Ph.D., University of Florida, Business Administra- 
tion (ASC) 

THELMA M. HARMOND. Ph.D., Ohio State University, Education 
(SSC) 

JOHNR. HANSEN, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Mathematics (ASC) 

HENRY E. HARRIS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, Chemis- 
try (ASC) 

LAWRENCE HARRIS, Ph.D., University Santo Tomas, Manila, His- 
tory and Political Science (SSC) 

JERALINE HARVEN, Ed.D., Indiana University, Business Education 

(SSC) 

JOHN S. HINKEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Mathematics 

(ASC) 

JOHN HOUSTON, Ph.D., Purdue University, Mathematics (SSC) 

ANNE L. HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University, Mathematics (ASC) 

SIGMUND HUDSON, Ph.D., Tulane University, Mathematics (SSC) 

FRISSEL R. HUNTER, Ph.D. , State University of Iowa, Biology (SSC) 

JEFFREY JAMES, Ph.D., Howard University, Chemistry (SSC) 

JAMES LAND JONES, Ph.D., Tulane University, English (ASC) 

DALE Z. KILHEFNER, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, Math- 
ematics (ASC) 



11 



JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, Ph.D., Columbia University, English (ASC) 

PULLABHOTIA V. KRISHNAMURTI, Ph.D., Texas A. and M. Uni- 
versity, Biology (SSC) 

MICHAEL A. LABURTIS, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

MARY LOU LAMB, Ed.D., Indiana University, Business Education 

(ASC) 

OSMOS LANIER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (ASC) 
JOSEPH LANE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Psychology (ASC) 

CORNELIA V. LAWSON, Ed.D., University of Arkansas, Education 

(SSC) 

MARGARET LAWSON, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, English 

(ASC) 

CHARLES LASKA, Ph.D., Syracuse University, Mathematics (ASC) 

ELIZABETH LUNZ, Ph.D., Tulane University, English (SSC) 

ISAIAH McIVER, Ph.D., Loyola University, History (SSC) 

WILLIAM D. MCCARTHY, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Business 
Administration (ASC) 

MICHAEL K. MAHER, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

JOHN C. MCCARTHY, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Political Science 

(ASC) 

MANCHERY P. MENON, Ph.D., University of Arkansas, Chemistry 

(SSC) 

LUETTA C. MILLEDGE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, English (SSC) 

RICHARD E. MUNSON, Ph.D., Rutgers University, Mathematics 

(ASC) 

K. G. NAMBIAR, Ph.D., Texas A. & M. University, Biology (SSC) 

JAMES S. NETHERTON, Ph.D., University of Virginia, Mathematics 
(ASC) 






S. LLOYD NEWBERRY, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education 

(ASC) 






JOHN F. NEWMAN, Ph.D., University of Florida, Political Science 

(ASC) 

HERBERT O'KEEFE, Ph.D., Georgia State University, Accounting 
(SSC) 



12 



i 



GEORGE 0. O'NEILL, Ph.D., University of Southern California, En- 
glish (SSC) 

ROBERT M. PATTERSON, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, History 
(ASC) 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, English 

(ASC) 

ALLEN L. PINGEL, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Biology 
(ASC) 

H. DEAN PROPST, Ph.D., Peabody College, English (ASC) 

KAMALAKAR RAUT, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Chemistry 

(SSC) 

STEVE YOUNG RHEE, Ph.D., University of Missouri, Political Sci- 
ence (ASC) 

EMORY H. RICHARDS, Ph.D., Ohio State University, Business Ad- 
ministration (ASC) 

PAUL E. ROBBINS, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, Chemistry 
(ASC) 

A. DORIS ROBINSON, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Education 

(SSC) 

MARGARET C. ROBINSON, Ph.D., Washington University, Biology 

(SSC) 

DeLACY SANFORD, Ph.D., State University of N. Y., Stony Brook, 
History (SSC) 

HERMAN SARTOR, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Education (SSC) 

CHARLES T. SHIPLEY, Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Mathematics 

(ASC) 

JOHN E. SIMPSON, Ph.D., University of Georgia, History (SSC) 
HARPAL SINGH, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Biology (SSC) 
R. B. SINGH, Ph.D. , Patna University, Business Administration (SSC) 
STEVEN SMITH, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, History (SSC) 

JACQUELYN STEPHENS, Ed.D., Oklahoma University, Education 

(SSC) 

ROBERT L. STEVENSON, Ph.D., University of Indiana, English 

(SSC) 

MEROLYN STEWART, Ph.D., University of Missouri, History (SSC) 



13 



WILLIAM W. STOKES, Ed. D., University of Florida, Education (ASC) 

JANET D. STONE, Ph.D., Emory University, History (ASC) 

CEDRIC STRATTON, Ph.D., Birbeck College, London, England, 
Chemistry (ASC) 

ROBERT I. STROZIER, Ph.D., Florida State University, English 

(ASC) 

RICHARD SUMMERVILLE, Ph.D., Syracuse University, Mathemat- 
ics (ASC) 

JOSEPH W. SUMMER, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Education 

(SSC) 

CLAUDIA THOMAS, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, Ph.D., University of Georgia, Biology (ASC) 

MARY C. TORIAN, Ed.D., New York University, Business Adminis- 
tration (SSC) 

WILLIE G. TUCKER, Ph.D. , University of Oklahoma, Chemistry (SSC) 

HANES WALTON, Ph.D., Howard University, History (SSC) 

PAUL E. WARD, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Education (ASC) 

ROGER K. WARLICK, Ph.D., Boston University, History (ASC) 

BERNARD L. WOODHOUSE, Ph.D., Howard University, Biology 
(SSC) 



14 



HISTORY, PURPOSE 
AND ORGANIZATION 



HISTORY 

Graduate Studies in Savannah were initiated at the beginning of the 
summer quarter 1968, when Savannah State College, with the approval of 
the Board of Regents, began offering courses leading to the degree of 
Master of Science in Elementary Education. The program operated as an 
independent program for thirteen quarters, enrolling well over two 
hundred students. It was approved by both the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and the Georgia State Board of Education. Seventy- 
five persons received master's degrees under this program. 

Beginning with the fall quarter of 1971, Savannah State College joined 
with Armstrong State College to offer a joint program of graduate work. 
The combined faculties, library holdings, and facilities of the two colleges 
made possible the expansion of the graduate program to include a master's 
degree in business administration as well as the program in elementary 
education. In the spring of 1972, the Board of Regents approved the 
addition of secondary options in the Master of Education program. The 
Joint Graduate Studies Program has been fully accredited by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools, with its degree programs in Educa- 
tion approved by the Georgia State Department of Education. 

PURPOSE 

The philosophical base of the Joint Graduate Studies Program is an 
affirmation of the dignity and worth of the individual. Implicit in this 
philosophy is a realization that modern man must be productive, articulate, 
and proactive. The Program is dedicated to service through: educational 
programs, community involvement, faculty and student research, 
scholarship and creativity. By offering advanced preparation to those who 
professionally serve the public schools, the Joint Graduate Studies Pro- 
gram contributes to the development of teachers who possess the qualities 
of character, commitment, and professional promise, and through these 
teachers, to the children they serve. By offering advanced professional 
training in management and administration, the Program serves individu- 
als for positions of responsibility in business, industry, government and 
education.- 



15 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Joint Graduate Program is designed to insure the equal involvement 
of the two Colleges in the administration of the program and the instruc- 
tion offered within the program. Students are required to take one-half of 
the courses in their degree programs at Savannah State College and 
one-half of the courses at Armstrong State College. The graduate degrees, 
bearing the signatures of both Presidents, are awarded jointly by the two 
Colleges. The location of the graduation ceremonies alternates between 
the two Colleges. 

The policy-making body for the Joint Graduate Program is the Graduate 
Council which is composed of representatives from both Colleges. Pro- 
grams and general academic policies are approved by the Graduate Council 
for recommendation to the Presidents. The combined resources of the 
academic departments and libraries and the campus facilities of the two 
Colleges are utilized in support of the Joint Graduate Program. 

Administrative operations of the program are the responsibility of the 
two Graduate Deans and of the Department Heads on the two campuses. 
Each of the Graduate Deans serve a two-year term, on an alternating 
basis, as the Coordinating Dean for Graduate Studies. The Heads of 
Departments alternate on a yearly basis as Departmental Coordinators. 
The various administrative officers of the two Colleges give further sup- 
port to the program. 



16 



FEES, REFUNDS, & 
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



ALL FEES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE END OF ANY 
QUARTER. 

APPLICATION FEE 

An application fee of $10.00 is paid by each graduate student at the time 
of initial application for admission. This fee is not required of graduates 
from either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. The 
acceptance of the application fee does not constitute acceptance of the 
student into the graduate program. This fee, which is paid at Armstrong 
State College, is not refundable. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

The matriculation fee for part-time students is $12.00 per quarter hour; 
thus, the matriculation fee for one five (5) hour course is $60.00. Students 
carrying 12 credit hours or more will pay $145.00. 

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION 

Non-residents of Georgia carrying 12 credit hours or more must pay a fee 
of $238.00 per quarter in addition to all regular fees. Students carrying less 
than 12 credit hours in a quarter who are not legal residents of the State of 
Georgia will pay at the rate of $20.00 per quarter hour for out-of-state 
tuition, in addition to matriculation fees. For residency requirements as 
established by the Board of Regents, see the Bulletin and General 
Catalogue of Armstrong State College. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE 

All students enrolled for six quarter hours or more must pay an Activity 
Fee of $15.00 per quarter. 

ATHLETIC FEE 

All students must pay an Athletic Fee of $8.00 per quarter. 



17 



LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students registering on 
the date listed in the catalogue as the date on which classes begin. A fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the date listed in the 
catalogue as the "last day to register for credit." 

GRADUATION FEE 

Each candidate for graduation must pay a graduation fee of $27.50 prior 
to his or her graduation. This fee must be paid at Savannah State College. 
For further information, inquire at the Graduate Offices. 

REFUNDS 

Refund of the matriculation fee and of non-resident tuition will be made 
only upon written application for withdrawal from school. No refunds are 
made for simply dropping a course. Refunds must be processed by the 
College at which fees were paid. Privilege fees are not refundable. Both 
Colleges follow the refund policy of the Board of Regents as stated below: 

Students who formally withdraw on the date of scheduled registra- 
tion or during one week following the scheduled registration date are 
entitled to a refund of 80% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students 
who formally withdraw during the period between one and two 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 
60% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally with- 
draw between two and three weeks after the scheduled registration 
date are entitled to a refund of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who formally withdraw during the period between three 
and four weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a 
refund of 20% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who with- 
draw after a period of four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled 
registration date will be entitled to no refund of any part of the fees 
paid for that quarter. 






DORMITORY FEES AT SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 






Students who occupy dormitory facilities at Savannah State College 
should refer to the Savannah State general Bulletin for information on 
fees and should contact the Office of Student Affairs at Savannah State for 
assistance. 






18 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified 
students; these assistantships are awarded and administered by the indi- 
vidual graduate departments of the two Colleges. Students may seek 
information from the individual departments about assistantships but are 
advised to make a formal request for an assistantship only after their 
admission to the Graduate Program with Regular Admission status. 

Students are invited to contact the Offices of Financial Aids at the two 
Colleges for information on federal and state programs of financial assis- 
tance to college students. 

VETERANS BENEFITS 

Both campuses provide graduate students with veteran's services 
through Offices of Veterans Affairs. Information of interest to veterans 
can be obtained by writing or calling the office of Veteran Affairs at either 
Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. 

Once accepted into the graduate program, the veteran should contact 
one of the offices for processing instructions. Since processing time varies, 
a first quarter student should expect a four to six week delay in receiving 
the first benefit check. First quarter student veterans should consider this 
delay when making financial arrangements to attend school. 

For purposes of G.I. Bill benefits, ten (10) quarter hours is considered to 
be a full load; a load of five (5) graduate quarter hours entitles the graduate 
student to half-time benefits. 



19 



ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDIES 



Graduate course work provides an opportunity for continuing profes- 
sional growth and competency, for expanding professional and cultural 
backgrounds, and for extending knowledge and understanding in an area 
of specialty. Qualified students may take advantage of these educational 
opportunities without necessarily seeking a degree, but admission to one of 
the degree programs of the Joint Graduate Program is a serious academic 
venture. Therefore, prospective students are expected to show evidence of 
high academic achievement and potential. Students who enroll as degree- 
seeking students must meet more rigorous admission standards than those 
students who do not seek a master's degree. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants desiring admission on a degree-seeking status must present 
satisfactory undergraduate academic records and satisfactory scores on 
appropriate admissions examinations. Some of the graduate degree pro- 
grams have specialized test requirements, specified undergraduate course 
requirements, or other requirements for degree-seeking students. Refer 
to the departmental programs for specific information on these require- 
ments. 

General requirements for degree-seeking students include the fol- 
lowing: applicants for the M.B.A. program must provide satisfactory 
scores on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT); applicants 
for all M.Ed, programs must provide satisfactory scores on either the 
Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Common 
Examination of the National Teacher Examination (NTE). Satisfactory 
undergraduate grades must be presented by all degree-seeking students. 

Admission to some programs may require satisfactory scores on either 
the appropriate area examination of the NTE or the appropriate advanced 
test of the GRE. For details of such requirements, consult the appropriate 
departmental entry in the catalogue or the Departmental Coordinator or 
the Graduate Office. 

Applications for the above examinations are usually available at the two 
Colleges and will be given to students who come to the Colleges to obtain 
them. Students who wish to w r rite for an application form or to submit an 
application for these examinations should contact: Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540. Students should request that their 
test scores be sent to the Graduate Studies Office, Armstrong State 
College, Savannah, Georgia 31406. 



20 



CATEGORIES OF ADMISSION 

Regular Admission 
(a degree status classification) 



DEFINITION 



Regular Admission means that a student has met all admission require- 
ments and is admitted to a degree program with full graduate status. 

REQUIREMENTS 

A student who has earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
college, who has completed all of the prerequisites for his planned graduate 
field of study, and who meets the other requirements of the Graduate 
Program may be admitted on Regular Admission status. These require- 
ments include minimum undergraduate grade-point averages in combina- 
tion with certain minimum test scores. For the M.B.A. program, these 
grade point averages range from a minimum G.P. A. of 2.5 to a minimum of 
3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and must be combined with minimum test scores on the 
GMAT. See the Business Administration departmental section of this 
catalogue for specific requirements. For M.Ed, programs, a minimum 
G.P. A. of 2.5 is required and a minimum test score of 550 on the NTE 
Commons examination or 800 on the GRE Aptitude examination. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the appropriate 
departmental entry. Degree programs providing teacher certification 
have other admission requirements, including: (1) a recommendation 
from the school in which a student has been employed as a teacher or has 
completed a student internship, and (2) eligibility for fourth level certifica- 
tion in the field of study. (For further information on admission to certifica- 
tion programs, consult the Graduate Office or the Education Departmental 
Coordinator.) 



Provisional Admission 
(a degree status classification) 

DEFINITION 

Provisional Admission means that a student has applied for admission to 
a degree program and has some condition placed on his status such as low 
grades or test scores. The student is admitted to a degree program but 
must meet certain conditions before achieving full graduate status (i.e., 
Regular Admission). 



21 



REQUIREMENTS 

For Provisional Admission, a student must hold a baccalaureate degree 
and meet the other admission requirements of the Graduate Program. 
These requirements include minimum undergraduate grade point aver- 
ages in combination with certain minimum test scores. 

For the M.B.A. program these grade point averages range from a 
minimum G.P.A. of 2.2 to a minimum of 2.7 and must be combined with 
minimum test scores on the GMAT. See the Business Administration 
departmental section of this catalogue for specific requirements. 

For the M.Ed, programs, students who fail to meet Regular Admission 
score requirements may be granted Provisional Admission if the combina- 
tions of their G.P.A. and test scores conform to the following formulas: 

GPA x 100 + NTE Common = 750 or more. 
GPA x 100 + GRE Aptitude = 1000 or more. 

In no case, however, may the G.P.A. be less than 2.2, the NTE less than 
450, or the GRE less than 700. 

For area test scores required by any department, see the appropriate 
departmental entry. 

Additional Stipulations for Provisional Admissions. 

As with Regular Admission, recommendation forms and other aspects of 
the Admissions Procedures must be adhered to. 

Provisionally admitted students may be required to remove any specific 
deficiencies that are ascertained by taking undergraduate supporting 
courses before the students are allowed to attempt graduate courses 
within the program to which they have been admitted. M.Ed, students 
may remain admitted on a provisional basis until they have attempted 15 
hours of approved graduate work. If they satisfactorily complete the 
initial, approved 15 hours of graduate work with no grade less than a "B, " 
- of which 10 hours must be in the professional sequence - and submit 
the appropriate Area test score, if required, these students may submit a 
written request, with advisor's endorsement, to move into Regular status. 

Upon satisfying the Area test score, if required, and upon completing 25 
hours of approved course work with a "B" average or better, of which 15 
hours must be in the major field of study, any provisionally admitted 
student (M.B.A. or M.Ed.) will be eligible for Regular status. If the 
student does not have a "B" average or better upon completing these 25 
hours of course work, he or she will be dropped as a degree-seeking 
student. 






22 



Post Baccalaureate and Post Graduate Admission 
(Nondegree status) 

Post Baccalaureate or Post Graduate admission is provided for those 
students who may not wish to pursue a graduate degree, including 
teachers whose main purpose is to obtain credits necessary for teacher 
certification and/or for students who may desire to enter a degree program 
but who have missing data. Requirements for Post Baccalaureate Admis- 
sion include documentary evidence of a baccalaureate degree and submis- 
sion of necessary application papers. The student may also have to meet 
specific prerequisites to enroll in courses in certain departments. Post 
Graduate Admission requirements are the same except that a graduate 
degree is required. 

No more than fifteen (15) hours earned while enrolled as a Post 
Graudate or Post Baccalaureate student may be applied toward a 
M.Ed, degree and no more than ten (10) hours toward aM.B. A. degree. 

A student admitted on non-degree status who wishes to be advanced to a 
degree status category of admission bears the responsibility for: 

1. Meeting all requirements for degree status which are in effect at the 
time the student submits to the graduate office the required data 
and documents for degree status. 

2. Notifying the Graduate Admissions Office in writing of the intent and 
desire to advance to degree status. 

Action by the Graduate Admissions Office to advance a non-degree 
student to a degree status category is contingent on the student meeting 
the above responsibilities, and the student is cautioned to maintain a 
careful check on his or her status. 

TRANSIENT STUDENT 

Transient students must arrange to have written authorization sent to 
the Graduate Office from their dean, department head, or registrar at the 
graduate school in which they are enrolled in order to be accepted as a 
transient student and to register in the Joint Graduate Program. They 
must also submit the application for admission form and the $10 fee as 
described in the Admission Procedures. If they wish to become degree- 
seeking students, they must request appropriate admission in writing and 
must submit the necessary documents. 

READMISSIONS 

Any student in the Joint Graduate Program who did not matriculate 
(i.e., register) during the quarter immediately preceding the quarter in 
which he next intends to matriculate must process a readmission form with 
the Registrar's Office. The only students exempted from this requirement 



23 



are those students who are initially admitted for graduate study in the 
quarter immediately preceding the quarter of their first matriculation. For 
further information, inquire at the Graduate Offices or Registrar's office. 
(Note: through the Summer Quarter of 1980, the Registrar at Armstrong 
State College will handle matriculations and readmissions for the Joint 
Graduate Program.) 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

The Graduate Office at Armstrong State College is the graduate admis- 
sions office. All admissions documents should be sent to this office for 
processing; the application for admission, the compliance form, $10 fee, 
and transcripts must reach the office 20 days prior to registration. 

The following materials and procedures are part of the requirements for 
admission to the Joint Graduate Studies Program. 

1. The application-for-admission form and compliance form, available in 
the Graduate Office at either College, must be completed and submit- 
ted. Required of all applicants, 20 days prior to registration. 

2. Three (3) official transcripts showing all college credits earned for the 
undergraduate degree should be sent directly from the college which 
awarded the degree to the Graduate Office at Armstrong State 
College. Required of all applicants except transient students who 
may submit letter of authorization from their graduate school (20 
days prior to registration). 

3. Test scores, as appropriate and as required for the major, must be 
submitted. Required of degree-seeking students only. 

4. Completed recommendation forms (2) must be submitted; these 
forms are available in the two Graduate Offices. For applicants enter- 
ing teacher certification programs, at least one (1) recommendation 
must be from supervisory personnel who observed the student in a 
teaching internship or as an employed teacher. These recom- 
mendations are required of degree-seeking stude?its only. 

5. A ten dollar ($10) application fee is required of all students, except 
graduates of Savannah State College and Armstrong State College. 

All materials and documents should be submitted as soon as possible, but 
items as noted above must arrive at least twenty (20) days prior to the 
registration date of the quarter a student enrolls. Action can be taken on 
applications for admission only after essential materials have been re- 
ceived. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY DOES NOT IMPLY AU- 
TOMATIC ACCEPTANCE OF THE STUDENT AS A CANDIDATE 
FOR ANY MASTER'S DEGREE. SEE SECTION ON CANDIDACY 
FOR DEGREE. 

24 









ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The student is charged with the responsibility for taking the initiative in 
meeting all academic requirements and in maintaining a careful check on 
his or her progress toward earning a degree. The student is responsible for 
discharging his or her obligations to the business offices and the libraries 
and for adhering to the rules and regulations appertaining to graduate 
students in particular and to all students enrolled in a unit of the University 
System of Georgia. Graduate student academic regulations are set forth in 
this bulletin; for information regarding general regulations of students 
using the property and facilities of Savannah State College or Armstrong 
State College, refer to the general bulletins and student publications of the 
two Colleges. It is the student's responsibility to abide by catalogue 
requirements. A student's claim that he or she has been granted an 
exception to these requirements must be documented before the merits of 
the claim can be evaluated. Students should note carefully the regula- 
tions in this chapter of the catalogue as well as in the admissions 
chapter. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to graduate study, each student will be referred to a 
departmental coordinator or office for adviser assignment. Consultation 
with the assigned adviser is required prior to registration. Each student 
must process appropriate advisement papers which are available from his 
or her assigned adviser and which provide the adviser clearance required 
for registration. 

Transient students report to the Graduate Office for advisement and 
adviser clearance. 

Post Baccalaureate and Post Graduate students obtain adviser clearance 
by processing the non-degree advisement form with their assigned advis- 
ers. During the quarter in which a Post Baccalaureate student achieves 
degree-seeking status, he or she must process the Program of Study form. 

Degree-seeking students, both Regular and Provisional Admissions 
students, must process the Program of Study form with their assigned 
adviser no later than the end of their first quarter of enrollment. A 
temporary adviser clearance statement may be provided by the adviser 
which will be valid only for the student's initial registration. This tempor- 
ary clearance should be processed on non-degree advisement form, with 
appropriate notations made to indicate that it is temporary. 



25 



The Program of Study shows the courses the student will take in his or 
her degree program, transfer courses that might apply to the degree, and 
prerequisite courses or other prerequisites. The Program of Study must be 
followed by the student in fulfilling degree requirements. However, the 
student can take courses additional to those on his Program of Study, and 
he may enroll in the courses on his Program of Study during quarters other 
than those which might be shown on his Program of Study form. Moreover, 
the student may officially modify his Program of Study with the concurr- 
ence of his adviser and other appropriate personnel by processing the form 
for Modification of Program of Study. These forms are available from the 
advisers. 

Students should note that any departure from the catalogue re- 
quirements for a degree must be approved by the Graduate Dean. 

FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

Specialized advisement is available for foreign students from the 
Graduate Foreign Student Adviser, Dr. Kamalakar Raut, located in room 
231, Griffin-Drew Science Hall, at Savannah State College. The mailing 
address is P.O. Box 20397, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia, 
31401. 

REGISTRATION 

Before a student may register for graduate courses in the Joint Graduate 
Program he must be formally admitted as a graduate student (although 500 
level courses may be taken by undergraduate students upon complying 
with requirements and procedures stipulated by and available in the 
Graduate Offices). If his circumstances require it, he must be readmitted 
(see section on Admissions, paragraph on Readmissions). Through the 
Summer Quarter of 1980, registration will occur on the Armstrong State 
campus. In order to register, a student will be required to show at registra- 
tion his admission confirmation and his advisor clearance forms. 

TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDITS 

A maximum of thirty (30) hours of credit may be transferred from 
another institution, provided: 

1. that each course equates with a course in the curriculum of the Joint 
Graduate Program or is an acceptable elective. 

2. that the credit was earned in an accredited graduate program. 

3. that a grade of B or better was earned in each course. 

4. that the credit was earned no more than six years prior to completion 
of all degree requirements. 



26 



5. that no more than fifty percent of the required credits shall be 
transferred for use towards a master's degree (i.e. , no more than 50% 
of either the required professional education credits or other required 
credits in M.Ed, programs). 

For additional information on the amount of credit transferable for a 
particular degree program, refer to the appropriate departmental entry. 

PROCEDURES FOR PROCESSING TRANSFER CREDITS 

Requests by students to receive transfer graduate credit must be sup- 
ported by three (3) copies of the graduate transcript showing the credits 
requested. The formal and final request for receiving transfer credit is part 
of the Application for Candidacy which the student must process upon the 
completion of 25 hours of graduate work. This application is obtained in the 
Graduate Offices. The three (3) graduate transcripts should be sent to the 
Savannah State Graduate Office. 

Advisement on transfer of credit is routinely provided on the Program of 
Study form which every degree-seeking student must complete with his 
adviser in his first quarter of enrollment. Formal approval of transfer 
credits is granted via the student's Application for Candidacy which re- 
quires approval by the student's adviser and Department Coordinator and 
by the Graduate Dean. 

Prospective students may write to the Department Coordinator in their 
area of study to obtain advisement on transfer of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Courses numbered 500 to 599 are open to both undergraduate and 
graduate students. In such courses, the quantity and quality of work 
required of the graduate students will be on the same level as that required 
in those courses offered exclusively for graduates. Courses numbered 600 
to 699 will be open only to graduate students. Candidates for master's 
degrees must take at least fifty percent of their courses at the 600 level. 

GRADUATE CLASS REGULATIONS AND SCHEDULES 

Graduate classes are conducted in conformity with the general academic 
policies of the BoarM of Regents and of the Joint Graduate Program and the 
regulations of the Campus on which a given class is taught. Specific class 
requirements, including attendance requirements and requirements for 
grades are set by the instructor for each class. 

The two sponsoring Colleges reserve the right to cancel classes and to 
adjust class schedules. 



27 



GRADES AND GRADE POINT AVERAGES 

In accordance with the policies of the Board of Regents, the Joint 
Graduate Program is on a 4.0 grade point system. The only grades ap- 
proved by the Board of Regents for computing the grade point averages of 
students are: A— 4, B— 3, C— 2, D— 1, F— 0, and WF (withdrew 
failing) — 0. The Board of Regents has also approved for uses other than for 
computing grade point averages, the following symbols: I — incomplete; 
W — withdrew without penalty; V — audit; K — credit for a course by 
examination; and S — satisfactory and U — unsatisfactory which are appli- 
cable only to theses, practicums, internships, and proficiency require- 
ments. 

In the Joint Graduate Program grades assigned are A, B, C, D, F 
(failure), I (incomplete), W (withdrew with no penalty), and WF (withdrew 
failing). The grade of W does not enter into computing a student's grade 
point average. 

Stipulations applicable to other symbols used in the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program include: 

I — incomplete. May be awarded by an instructor, who will also stipulate 
the conditions for its removal. Any grade of I which has not been removed 
by completing the course after three (3) quarters of matriculating in 
residence after the I was awarded shall become an automatic F; if the I has 
not been removed within one calendar year after the I was awarded, 
regardless of intervening matriculations, the I shall become an F. 

W — withdrawal without penalty. May be awarded by an instructor up to 
the mid-quarter period in a course. Regents' policy stipulates that "With- 
drawals without penalty will not be permitted after the mid-point of the 
total grading period (including final examinations) except in cases of hard- 
ship as determined by the appropriate official of the respective institu- 
tion." 

WF — withdrew failing. May be awarded by an instructor anytime that a 
student withdraws from a course after the drop/add period; mandatory 
after midquarter except for hardship cases as stipulated above for grades 
of W. 

V — audit. Use of this symbol is subject to the discretion of the individual 
joint graduate departments, and the departments may require that a 
student receive the permission of the instructor to audit a course prior to 
registering for the course. Moreover, an auditing student must pay the 
usual fees, must register for the course, and may not transfer from audit 
to credit status (or vice versa). 

S and U — satisfactory and unsatisfactory; see above. Specific courses 
receiving these grades are identified in departmental course listings. 
Comprehensive examinations are given these grades also. 



28 



K — credit by examination. Use of this symbol is subject to the discretion of 
the individual joint graduate departments. 

Students expecting to receive grades of V or K must insure that they are 
enrolled in an appropriate course or activity for which V or K grades are 
awarded by the appropriate department. If this catalogue does not show in 
the departmental entries that the given departments have authorized the 
use of V or K, then a student expecting to receive V in a course should 
obtain written verification from the appropriate instructor prior to regis- 
tering for the course that V will be awarded. 

Grade point averages are calculated on all graduate work attempted. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND STANDING 

Any student who falls below a 3.0 (B) average shall be on academic 
probation. 

Any student who is admitted to Provisional Admission status and who 
does not achieve a 3.0 average or better upon completing 25 hours shall be 
dropped as a degree student and be placed on non-degree status. Any 
Regular Admission student who has less than a 3.0 average after complet- 
ing 25 or more hours shall be placed on "regular admission — probation 
status" and shall be required to achieve grades of B or better in all courses 
in order to maintain this status and must achieve a 3.0 average in order to 
return to Regular Admission status. Any student on "regular 
admission — probation status" who earns less than a B in any course or who 
accumulates 75 hours while still on this status shall be dropped as a degree 
student and shall be placed on non-degree status. 

COURSE LOAD LIMITATION 

A full-time graduate student is expected to carry no more than fifteen 
(15) hours per quarter. The course load for employed students should be 
appropriately reduced in consultation with their advisers. Students on 
academic probation or on Provisional Admissions status should carefully 
plan their course loads in consultation with their advisers. 

WITHDRAWAL, DROPPING COURSES, AND 
ADDING COURSES 

Withdrawal is, in the technical sense, dropping all courses and process- 
ing a formal withdrawal through the Office of Graduate Studies which 
issues a withdrawal form. A student may withdraw from school (or drop a 
single course) at any time during the quarter. Only by formally withdraw- 
ing, however, can a student become eligible for the refund of fees as 
explained in the section on fees. The student bears the responsibility of 
contacting the graduate office to effect a withdrawal and of contacting his 
professor(s) to determine what grade(s) he will receive (W or WF). In 



29 



order to expedite any refund due, the student must initiate his withdrawal 
on the same campus where he paid fees. 

Dropping a course should also be formalized through the Graduate Office 
which will process a drop/add slip. If a student is taking only one course, 
the drop becomes, technically, a withdrawal, and a refund may be due. The 
student is responsible for contacting his instructor concerning the grade he 
will receive (W,WF). 

Adding a course may be accomplished through the Registrar's Office 
which will process a drop/add slip. Courses may be added only during the 
late registration days at the beginning of the quarter and not at any other 
time during the quarter. The student must pay the appropriate fee for the 
additional course, unless a course comparable in credit hours is being 
dropped simultaneously. 

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWALS 

The Graduate Offices reserve the right to effect the withdrawal of any 
student at any time during his course of studies if he does not meet his 
financial obligations or the required standards of scholarship, or if he 
cannot remain in the program without endangering his own health or the 
health of others, or if he fails in any way to meet the standards of the Joint 
Graduate Program. 

CATES COURSES 

Savannah State College and Armstrong State College participate in the 
Coastal Area Teacher Education Service, a consortium of area public 
school systems and institutions of the University System of Georgia offer- 
ing graduate and undergraduate courses in teacher education. 

A student who wishes to apply CATES course credit to his degree 
program must obtain approval from his adviser to take a course for degree 
credit prior to taking the course. Without this prior approval, the course is 
subject to being treated as a transfer course, in which case, the Transfer of 
Graduate Credits policies and procedures described in this Bulletin will be 
followed. 



30 



DEGREES AND GENERAL 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



DEGREES OFFERED 

The following degrees are offered in the Joint Graduate Studies Pro- 
gram: 

Master of Business Administration 
Master of Education in Business Education 
Master of Education in Biology 
Master of Education in Chemistry 
Master of Education in Elementary Education 
Master of Education in Early Childhood Education 
Master of Education in Special Education — Behavior Disorders 
Master of Education in English 

Master of Education in Mathematics (Not active at present time) 
Master of Education in History 
Master of Education in Political Science 

(English, History, and Political Science are available as options without 
teacher-certification requirements) 

The sponsoring colleges have approved the addition of Master of Educa- 
tion degree programs in Industrial Arts Education and Science Education, 
and of Master of Science degree programs in Chemistry and Criminal 
Justice. Approval of these degree programs is pending action by the Board 
of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Any student interested in 
one of these programs should request further information on the status of 
the program from the Office of Graduate Studies at either Savannah State 
College or Armstrong State College. 

TIME LIMITATION 

Students working toward a master's degree must complete all require- 
ments for the degree within a period of not more than six years from the 
date of first enrollment. Extension of time may be granted by the Graduate 
Council, upon recommendation of the student's major department, but 
only in cases of unusual circumstances. 

COURSE AND RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Satisfactory completion of at least sixty (60) quarter hours of graduate 
credit is necessary for the Master of Education degree, and a minimum of 
thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in residence. Courses to be 
counted for residence may be accumulated on a full-time or part-time basis. 






31 



Satisfactory completion of at least sixty (60) quarter hours of approved 
graduate credits is required for the Master of Business Administration 
degree, and a minimum of thirty (30) quarter hours must be earned in 
residence. 

Students should note that the sixty hour requirement is a minimum 
requirement. Degree students with academic weaknesses should recog- 
nize that they may have to complete more than sixty hours to fulfill all 
curriculum requirements and comply with all academic regulations. 

BALANCE OF COURSES 

Two forms of balance in accumulating courses must be adhered to by 
degree-seeking students. First, at least fifty percent (50%) of the courses 
earned for a degree must be at the 600 level. 

Second, fifty percent (50%) of the courses applied to a degree must be 
earned at each of the two Colleges (Savannah State and Armstrong State). 
This balance of courses between the two Colleges includes a 50-50 balanc- 
ing of the required courses and a 50-50 balancing of the elective courses in 
each degree program. Minor deviations from this strict 50-50 balancing of 
courses may be allowed where an odd number of courses in either the 
required or the elective category or in both categories requires the devia- 
tion. The departmental degree program descriptions identify the 600 level 
courses and provide additional guidance on balancing courses. 

DEGREE CANDIDACY 

Upon successful completion of twenty-five quarter hours of graduate 
work taken in residence and at least one quarter prior to making appli- 
cation for the degree, the student is required to file an application for 
admission to candidacy. The student will submit the completed application 
to his adviser. These application forms are available in the Graduate 
Offices on both campuses. 

Approval of the application will be based upon verification that the 
student: 

1. has been admitted to full graduate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

2. has maintained a minimum of a "B" average in all work attempted. 

APPLICATION FOR THE DEGREE 

At the time specified on the academic calendar, the student must file an 
application for the appropriate master's degree with his major depart- 
ment. Note that the application for the degree must be preceded by the 
application for candidacy by at least one quarter. Application forms are 
available in the Graduate Offices. 



32 



THIRTY HOUR PLAN FOR A SECOND MASTER'S DEGREE 

Students who have already earned a master's degree can, under certain 
circumstances, earn a second master's degree in the Joint Graduate Pro- 
gram by completing as little as 30 quarter hours of graduate work in 
residence. Essential elements of the second master's degree plan are: 

1. All general requirements (e.g. , Regular Admission status, adherence 
to general academic regulations, "B" average, comprehensive 
examinations, etc.) and all specific curricular requirements (i.e., 
departmental prerequisites for courses, specific courses, etc.) cur- 
rently applicable to a master's degree will apply to the second degree 
sought, except as explicity noted below: 

2. For the Second master's degree: 

A. The student must take at least 30 quarter hours in residence 
additional to course work that was used in fulfilling requirements 
for a previous master's degree. Additional hours may be neces- 
sary in order to fulfill curricular requirements or for such pur- 
poses as teacher certification in programs designed as Approved 
Programs for Georgia State Certification. 

B. The 30 (or more) hours in residence must meet existing require- 
ments on recency of credit. For the other hours, (hours applied to 
both the first degree and to the second degree), fifteen hours will 
have no age limit, but the remaining hours must be no more than 
twelve years old when requirements for the second master's 
degree are completed. 

C. A curriculum plan for a second degree that is consistent with 
existing catalogue plans must be prepared by a department head 
or by a graduate adviser with his or her department head's en- 
dorsement. A copy of this plan will be sent to both graduate offices 
and will be given to the student. For this purpose, current ad- 
visement forms, with appropriate modifications may be used. The 
plan must show the 30 (or more) hours to be taken in residence and 
the previous graduate hours that are to apply to the second 
degree. 

SUMMARY OF GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

General regulations for obtaining a master's degree from the Joint 
Graduate Studies Program are summarized as follows: 

1. Admission to full graduate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

2. Admission to candidacy for the degree. 

3. Satisfactory completion of at least sixty (60) quarter hours of ap- 
proved graduate level course work. 

33 



4. Meeting certification requirements for M.Ed, programs (some M.Ed, 
programs may have an option for no certification). 

5. Maintenance of "B" average. 

6. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination. 

7. Filing an application for the degree at the time specified. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Although some M.Ed, degree programs have an option for no certifica- 
tion most of these degrees are designed to comply with the requirements 
for teacher certification at the fifth level in the various areas of specializa- 
tion. The degree ordinarially is granted only to students who qualify for 
T-5 certification (or equivalent certification for other states), which in turn 
entails meeting T-4 certification requirements (Georgia). Students who 
use graduate credits to meet T-4 certification requirements may be re- 
quired to take graduate courses beyond the 60 hours required for the 
M.Ed, degree in order to meet T-5 certification requirements. Since the 
M.Ed, programs require 60 hours, which is 15 more than the 45 minimum 
required for the T-5 by the State Education Department, 15 of the 60 
graduate hours may be used to fulfill T-4 certification requirements. How- 
ever, none of the 15 hours so used can then be applied toward meeting the 
45 hours specified for the T-5. 

Detailed information concerning programs and procedures relating to 
graduate teacher certification may be obtained from the Office of Graduate 
Studies or from the Department of Education at either College. 

NON CERTIFICATION M.Ed. PROGRAMS 

Building on the basic, academic structure of the typical M.Ed, degree 
programs, departments may offer M.Ed, programs without applying all of 
the stipulations for certification programs. The curriculum essentials of a 
non-certification degree program are: 

At least fifteen hours of education course work. 

At least twenty five hours of major area course work. 

At least five hours of free electives. 

Such programs do not meet certification requirements by the State of 
Georgia. 



34 



DEPARTMENT: PROGRAMS 
AND COURSES 



Departmental requirements covering admissions, prerequisite courses, 
and other aspects of the programs of study are described in this section of 
the Bulletin. 

PROGRAM COORDINATORS 

For each program of study, the department head on one campus serves 
as the Coordinator. The Coordinators alternate on a yearly basis between 
Armstrong State College and Savannah State College and commence their 
service in September of the year. 

The Departmental Coordinators for the 1978-1979 year are: 

Business Administration: Dr. Mary Torian (SSC). 

Business Education: Dr. Thomas Eason (ASC). 

Biology: Dr. Leslie Davenport (ASC). 

Chemistry: Dr. Willie Tucker (SSC). 

Education: Dr. William Stokes (ASC). 

English: Dr. Luetta Milledge (SSC). 

History and Political Science: Dr. Roger Warlick (ASC). 

Mathematics: Dr. Richard Summerville (ASC). 

COURSES 

Graduate courses are listed and described in each departmental section. 
The following course numbering system is used: courses numbered 500-599 
may be taken by undergraduate or graduate students and, in some cases, 
are courses that are cross-listed as both 400 and 500 courses. Courses 
numbered 600-699 or higher are for graduate students only. 

Each course listed shows the departmental identification, the course 
number, the course name, a code number and the campus location. The 
code number indicates: with the first number, the hours of lecture per 
week, with the second number the hours of lab per week; and with the third 
number the quarter hours of credit for the course. Example: Chemistry 
522. Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-0). 

Statements on prerequisites, campus location and descriptions follow 
the course numbers. 



35 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Thomas R. Eason, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Mary Torian, 
Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Alban (ASC); Dr. Anderson (SSC); Dr. 
Bhatia (ASC); Dr. Hall (ASC); Dr. Laburtis (ASC); Dr. Lamb (ASC); Dr. 
McCarthy (ASC); Dr. O'Keefe (SSC); Dr. Richards (ASC); and Dr. Singh 
(SSC). 

Coordinator — 1978-1979 — Dr. Mary Torian 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Business Administration 

OBJECTIVE 

The Master of Business Administration degree program is designed to 
give candidates a broad background of advanced professional training in 
organizational management. 

ASMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to general admission requirements and procedures for all 
graduate programs stated earlier in this bulletin, more specific require- 
ments for admission to the MBA program are given below: 

All applicants for admission to the MBA program are required to take 
the Graduate Management Admissions Test. This test is administered at 
Savannah State College and at other testing centers once each quarter. 
The test is designed to measure aptitude for graduate study in business 
and is not a measure of knowledge in specific subjects. Therefore, appli- 
cants should not delay taking this examination simply because they have 
not had specific course work in business. 

REGULAR ADMISSION 

To qualify for admission to full graduate status in the MBA program, 
applicants must show competence in the common business core of knowl- 
edge, which requires a basic understanding of accounting, economics, 
finance, management, marketing, and statistics. Students who have re- 
ceived a bachelor's degree in business generally have fulfilled this re- 
quirement, but students with degrees in other disciplines will need pre- 
paratory work in these areas before beginning MBA course work. The 
preparatory requirements may be met by the satisfactory completion of 
not less than one course (equivalent to 5 quarter hours or 3 semester hours) 
in each of the following areas: 

Accounting (Principles, Managerial, or Cost) 

Economics (Micro and Macro Principles) 



36 



Finance (Business, Corporate, or Managerial 

Management (Principles) 

Marketing (Principles) 

Statistics (Elements of) 

Normally, thirty hours of preparatory work will be the maximum re- 
quired, but students should recognize that one course in accounting and 
one course in economics will provide only a minimum level of preparation 
for graduate course work. A better preparation could easily improve the 
performance in related graduate courses by one letter grade or even two. 

These preparatory requirements may be satisfied by taking appropriate 
courses on campus, or by correspondence, or by scoring not less than the 
fifieth percentile on the appropriate subject examination(s) of the CLEP 
(College Level Examination Program). The CLEP examinations are avail- 
able through the testing services of either College. 

In addition to appropriate preparatory work, regular admission status 
requires that one of the following admission standards be met: 

1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 and a score of not less 
than 450 on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or 

2. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 and a score of not less 
than 400 on the GMAT, or 

3. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 and a score of not less 
than 425 on the GMAT, or other combinations of grade point averages 
between 2.5 and 3.0 in conjunction with GMAT scores between 450 
and 400 on an inverse scale. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

Provisional admission will be granted to those applicants who meet all 
the requirements for regular admission with the exception of preparatory 
course work. Upon satisfactory completion of the prerequisite courses, the 
conditional status will be removed and regular admission status will be 
accorded. 

Provisional Admission may also be granted to a limited number of 
applicants who fail to meet the admission standards for regular admission 
but, nevertheless, present evidence of a reasonable prospect of success in 
the program. For this category of admission applicants must have, in 
addition to appropriate preparatory work, one of the following: 

1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.2 and a score of not less 
than 425 on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or 

2. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 and a score of not less 
than 375 on the Graduate Management Admission Test, or 



37 



3. Other combinations of grade point averages between 2.2 and 2.7 in 
conjunction with GMAT scores between 425 and 375 on an inverse 
scale. 

Upon completion of twenty-five hours of graduate course work with a 
"B" average, the Provisional Admission status will be changed to regular 
admission, providing the course prerequisite requirements for Regular 
Admission have been satisfied. Failure to maintain a "B" average in the 
first twenty-five hours of graduate work will result in being dropped as a 
degree-status student. 

ADMISSION STATUS AS A 
PREREQUISITE TO MBA COURSES 

Stipulations and problems related to the pursuit of graduate study in the 
business administration courses are such that students should meet those 
conditions identified above under either the Regular or the Provisional 
Admissions categories in order to enroll in any MBA courses. Post Bac- 
calaureate admission status offers little opportunity for graduate study in 
business administration and is granted to MBA students primarily to 
identify applicants who have not yet submitted a satisfactory GMAT score 
or a satisfactory G.P.A. or have not completed the preparatory courses. 

ADVISEMENT 

Upon admission to the graduate program, each student will be assigned 
a faculty adviser. The faculty adviser will approve the scheduling of course 
work, recommend the student for candidacy, and serve as chairman of the 
student's comprehensive examination committee. 



38 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Business Administration program requires forty-five 
quarter hours of core course requirements and an additional fifteen quar- 
ter hours of electives from graduate course offerings. 

Quarter Hours 
I. Core requirements 45 

BAD 602— Managerial Micro Economics (ASC) 

BAD 610— Managerial Statistics (SSC) 

BAD 611 — Quantitative Methods in Business (ASC) 

BAD 620— Managerial Finance (ASC) 

BAD 630— Managerial Costing and Control (SSC) 

BAD 650— Marketing Problems Seminar (SSC) 

BAD 660 — Advanced Management Seminar (ASC) 

BAD 662— Human Behavior in Organization (SSC) 

BAD 665— Administrative Policy (ASC or SSC) 

II. Electives 15 

BAD 601 BAD 612 BAD 621 BAD 661 

BAD 604 BAD 613 BAD 640 BAD 663 

BAD 605 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students are required to take one-half of their course work on each campus. Responsibil- 
ity for the MBA courses is divided between the two sponsoring colleges as indicated 
below: 

Required Courses 
Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BAD 610 BAD 650 BAD 602 BAD 620 

BAD 630 BAD 662 B Ad 611 BAd 660 

BAD 665 offered at SSC or ASC 

All courses are scheduled to be offered in early and late evening periods. Courses are 
offered on one campus on Monday and Wednesday and the other on Tuesday and 
Thursday. Thus, there are four non-conflicting evening periods. Each required course is 
offered every other quarter. A full-time student, having all undergraduate prerequisite 
courses, may complete the MBA program in four consecutive quarters. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

It will be the responsibility of the student to make application for 
admission to candidacy after the completion of all prerequisite courses and 
twenty-five hours of graduate course work. This application will be sub- 
mitted to the faculty adviser. Admission to candidacy is contingent upon 
verification that the student has attained a "B" average in twenty-five 
hours of course work and has met all regular admission requirements 
including: 

1. an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admissions Test. 

2. completion of all undergraduate prerequisite courses. 

3. removal of provisional admission status, when applicable. 

39 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A final comprehensive examination, to be scheduled in a student's final 
quarter and at least two weeks prior to graduation, is required of all 
candidates for the Degree of Master of Business Administration. The final 
examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of the student's 
faculty adviser as chairman and other members of the graduate faculty 
appointed by the MBA Coordinator. The date of the examination, the time 
and place, will be set by the Coordinator after consultation with the faculty 
adviser. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date, and time of the examination and the composition of the committee. 

The candidate is expected to demonstrate an adequate understanding of 
the common core of knowledge in business, economics, and statistics, and 
competency to discuss advanced material in those areas in which he has had 
graduate course work. 

The examinating committee's decision on the candidate's performance 
on the comprehensive examination shall be reported as "S" or "U" to the 
Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the examination. 
Should the decision be reported as "U," the committee will outline a 
program of corrective action to be taken by the candidate prior to his being 
re-examined. 

Graduate Courses in Business Administration 

It should be understood that prerequisite to all MBA courses, the 
student must satisfy requirements in the common body of knowledge of 
business and administration as stated above. Waivers may be granted for 
certain courses. 

BAD 601. Macro Economic Analysis. (5-0-5). SSC. 
National income accounting. Determinants of national income, employ- 
ment, price level and growth rates. 

BAD 602. Managerial Economics. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Economic analysis applied to decision making at the level of the firm. 
Analysis of demand, pricing, and cost. National income and firm forecast- 
ing problems. Financial and long term planning. 

BAD 604. Business Relations with Government and Society. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

The business environment with consideration of the economic, legal and 
social implications for policy making. 

BAD 605. Special Economic Problems. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Analysis of current economic issues. 



40 



BAD 610. Managerial Statistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Applications in economic and business statistics. 

BAD 611. Quantitative Methods in Business. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
BAD 610 or permission of instructor. 

The application of models and mathematical techniques to modern 
decision-making. 

BAD 612. Seminar in Business Research. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The application of research methods in both the internal and external 
domains of business. Guided research in a substantive field of the student's 
choice, i.e., finance, marketing, accounting, management, forecasting, or 
any other area in which the objectives of the research project is the 
acquisition of information useful to business enterprise. 

BAD 613. Administrative Communications. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The role of communication in effective business management; theory and 
principles necessary for practical applications; study of communication 
Problems within, between and among organizations, industry and their 
groups. 

BAD 620. Managerial Finance. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Analysis of financial problems and policies. 

BAD 621. Investment Management. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The theory and tools of analysis required in the management of financial 
assets from the viewpoint of the investor and the investment adviser, 
investment media, markets, problems, practices, and philosphies will be 
studied. 

BAD 630. Managerial Costing and Control. (5-0-5). SSC. 
The study of physical and monetary input-output relationships and use 
of such cost studies for managerial strategy, planning, and control. 

BAD 640. Information Systems. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Total Information Systems for managerial strategy, planning and con- 
trol. 

BAD 650. Marketing Problems Seminar. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An examination of new developments in the dynamic field of marketing 
from the viewpoint of the marketing decision-maker. 

BAD 660. Advanced Management Seminar. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The historical foundations and development of management concepts. 
Emphasis is upon developing concepts in dealing with emerging problems 
of management. 

BAD 661. Theory of Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A universally applicable study of organizations and their structures. 
Organizational factors and associated concepts are examined and analyzed. 



41 



BAD 662. Human Behavior in Organization. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Contributions and limitations of the behavior sciences in the develop- 
ment of modern organization theory. 

BAD 663. Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Modern industrial relations and its background. Current problems in 
labor relations. 

BAD 665. Administrative Policy. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. Must be taken in 
the last or next to last quarter of the M.B.A. Program. 

Policy-making and administration from the top management point of 
view, encompassing the entire field of organizations. 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Business Education 

Coordinator — 1978-1979 — Dr. Thomas Eason 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate program leading to the Master of Educa- 
tion Degree in Business Education are to prepare master teachers of 
business and vocational business education and to prepare individuals for 
administrative and supervisory positions in these specialties for the secon- 
dary and junior college levels. 

In keeping with the objectives of the Joint Graduate Studies Program, 
the M.Ed, in business education is designed for furthering professional 
growth and competency, expanding professional and cultural back- 
grounds, and extending knowledge and understanding in business educa- 
tion. 

This program supplements undergraduate studies for the T-4 Certifi- 
cate to teach in Georgia and provides opportunities for candidates to obtain 
the T-5 Certificate upon completion of the prescribed curriculum in busi- 
ness education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Formal admission to the degree program should be sought through the 
Admissions Office of the Joint Graduate Program as described in the 
General Admissions section of this Bulletin. 

In accordance with general admission policies, Regular Admission with 
full graduate status requires the minimum 2.5 cumulative undergraduate 
average with a score of at least 550 on the N.T.E. Common (or 800 on the 
G. R . E . Aptitude) . Regular Admission also requires a score of not less than 
560 on the business education area examination of the NTE. 

Provisional Admission may be granted to those students who show 
potential for successful pursuit of graduate studies. In accordance with 



42 



general admission policies, Provisional Admission requires the minimum 
G.P.A. and test score as called for in the general admission requirements. 
Provisional Admission also requires a score of not less than 540 on the 
business education area examination of the NTE. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in Business Education will be 
assigned an adviser. As soon as the student is notified of this assignment, 
he should arrange for a conference with his or her adviser. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Transfer of credits will be evaluated for full credit up to 25% of the 
required hours for graduation, but these credits must meet the general 
graduate policies on transfer of credit. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A minimum of 60 quarter hours of graduate course work with a B 
average (3.00) is required for graduation with an M.Ed, degree in 
Business Education. 

2. After admission to regular status in the graduate program, and upon 
completion of 25 quarter hours of satisfactory graduate work, the 
student should file application for candidacy in quadruplicate to the 
major department. 

3. During the quarter preceding the final intended quarter of matricula- 
tion for the M.Ed, degree in Business Education (and by the deadline 
specified on the academic calendar), the candidate must file an appli- 
cation for the degree with the Graduate Studies Office. 

4. During the final quarter of residence, a candidate must pass a final 
comprehensive examination in the field. The Business Education 
Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten (10) days prior to the examination concerning the pro- 
posed place, date, and time of the examination and the composition of 
the committee. The examining committee's decision on the candi- 
date's performance on the comprehensive examination will be re- 
ported as "pass" or "fail" to the Deans for Graduate Studies within 
three (3) days after the examination. 



43 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The basic plan of the curriculum is summarized as follows: 

Quarter Hours 

Professional Education Courses 20 

Business Education Content Courses 35 

(Includes BED 601 (5 hours), BED 611 (5 hours) and 10 hours of Business 
Administration cognate courses.) 

Electives 5 

Total 60 

The curriculum is designed with several options to meet the needs of 
varying specialists in the field of business teacher education. The course 
content of these options comes from appropriate selection of courses in the 
30-hour business education content area, including the 10 hours of cognate 
courses. These options and specific courses required under each are: 

Option 1. Administration and Supervision: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 603, 611 and 612 
Option 2. Stenographic-Clerical: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 621, and 622. 
Option 3. General Business and Accounting: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 631, and 632. 
Option 4. Data Processing: 

Required Courses: BED 601, 611, 623, and 624. 

Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Course Requirements 20 

EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

plus 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth 
and Development (SSC) 

or 
EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of Human 
Learning (SSC) 



44 



II. Content Course Requirements 35 

Content courses, including cognate courses, and electives will be select ed by t he st udenl 
based on his interests, aptitudes, and professional goals. A thesis option is available 
through registration in BED 690. BED 601 and BED 611 are required. 



BED 601 


BED 611 


BED 622 


BED 632 


BED 602 


BED 612 


BED 623 


BED 690 


BED 603 


BED 621 


BED 631 


BED 700 



All of the above courses carry 5 hours credit except 690 and 700 which carry 10 hours of 
credit each. 

Special Summer Workshop Courses Available 

BED 620—10 hours; combines BED 621 and 622 
BED 630—10 hours; combines BED 631 and 632 
BED 640—10 hours; combines BED 623 and 624 

Workshops are offered alternately on each campus. 

Business Administration Cognate Courses 

As a part of the content area, a minimum of 10 hours of Business Administration 
courses is required. These courses, selected in conference with the student's adviser, 
should complement the selected option of concentration. 

III. Elective Course Requirements 15 

The 15 hours of electives may be selected from Business Administration courses and 
should complement the selected option of concentration. An appropriate course in 
exceptional children (EXC 522) must be taken if not taken previously. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. For the campus 
location of the Education courses, see the Education Department section of this Bulle- 
tin. For the campus location of the Business Administration courses, see the Master of 
Business Administration degree program in this section of this Bulletin. A guide to the 
campus location of the business Education courses is given below. 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

BED 611 BED 624 BED 601 BED 621 

BED 612 BED 632 BED 602 BED 623 

BED 622 BED 700 BED 603 BED 631 

BED 690 offered at both Colleges. 

BED 620, 630, and 640 — For more information, contact the Coordinator. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The student who does not hold the Georgia T-4 teaching certificate or its 
equivalent must satisfy the regulations of the State Department of Educa- 
tion through additional courses as may be required. See section on Teacher 
Certification under General Degree Requirements. 



45 



Graduate Courses in Business Education 

BED 601. Principles, Problems, and Curriculum Development in Busi- 
ness Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive view of the basic principles and criteria for developing 
effective programs in business education on all levels, with special atten- 
tion to problems of identification, growth, and contributions. 

BED 602. Current Problems and Issues in Vocational Business Educa- 
tion. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of the principles of vocational education; federal and state 
legislation as it pertains to programs of vocational education; the organiza- 
tion and operation of vobe programs; and related research. 

BED 603. Evaluation of Research and Empirical Literature in Business 
Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Critical analysis of research studies in business education; study and 
development of reports, research studies; investigations, and method of 
recording and retaining data, with special emphasis on administrative 
data. 

BED 611. Administration and Supervision in Business Education. (5-0- 
5). SSC. 

Principles, policies, and procedures in developing appreciation and 
understanding of and knowledge and skill in the art of effective administra- 
tion and supervision in business education. 

BED 612. Guidance and Career Development in Business Education. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

The role of the business education teacher and administrator in develop- 
ing an effective career development program: inclusive of selection, re- 
cruitment, and grade or curriculum placement; keeping personnel records; 
a testing and evaluation program; counseling; placement; and followup. 

BED 621. Vocational Development in Shorthand and Typewriting. (5- 
0-5). ASC. 

Problems in development of occupational proficiency in shorthand and 
typewriting; new media and evaluation of aptitudes, interests, and 
achievement for vocational competency. 

BED 622. Vocational Development in Office Practice and Office 
Machines. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Enrichment of selected modules for developing vocational competency 
in the capstone course in Office Practice and in Office Machines. 

BED 623. Introduction to the Teaching of Data Processing. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Introduction to data processing; development of key punching and basic 
programming skills. 



46 



BED 624. Vocational Development in the Teaching of Data Processing. 
(5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Mathematics 306 or equivalent computer prog- 
ramming skill. 

Systems, program languages, computer and keypunch operation, other 
input devices for developing modules and techniques of teaching modern 
methods of data processing. 

BED 631. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching General Busi- 
ness. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An intensive concentration on objectives, instructional materials, 
media, teaching techniques, and evaluation procedures for general busi- 
ness and social business subjects. 

BED 632. Improved Techniques and Media for Teaching Bookkeeping 
and Accounting. (5-0-5). SSC. 

The development of enrichment materials and techniques for effective 
teaching and learning in bookkeeping and accounting. 

BED 690. Research and Thesis. (10 quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 
(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

An in-depth study and concentration in the development of the thesis 
research problem. Seminar sessions for progress reporting and critical 
analysis. 

BED 700. Internship in Teaching and/or Administrative Office Practice. 
(10 quarter hours). SSC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Internship teaching in vocational or secondary schools for those with 
needs in this area; full time work experience in structured offices for 
experienced teachers. 

BED 620. Workshop for Vocational Development in Stenographic Skills. 
(10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques and 
skills incorporated in BED 621 and BED 622 as described above. 

BED 630. Workshop for Vocational Development in General Business 
and Accounting. (10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of techniques and 
skills incorporated in BED 631-632 as described above. 

BED 640. Workshop for Vocational Development in Data Processing. 
(10 quarter hours). 

Intensive concentration involving the development of programming 
skills and the teaching of data processing. Combines BED 623 and 624. 



47 



BIOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Leslie Davenport, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Margaret Robin- 
son, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Beumer, (ASC); Dr. Emeh, (SSC); Dr. 
Guillou, (ASC); Dr. Hunter, (SSC); Dr. Krishnamurti, (SSC); Dr. Namb- 
iar, (SSC); Dr. Pingel, (ASC); Dr. Singh, (SSC); Dr. Thorne, (ASC); and 
Dr. Woodhouse, (SSC). 

Coordinator — 1978-1979 — Dr. Leslie Davenport 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Biology 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to graduate courses in biology requires that a student meet 
the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies Pro- 
gram and be formally admitted as a graduate student. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Biology Faculty and a professional adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each of his 
advisers and plan his program under their guidance, and should have at 
least one conference per quarter with his academic adviser. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 20 

EDN 671 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 

or 
EDN 622 — Nature and Conditions of Human Learning. (Both at SSC) 

plus 
EDN 631— Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

plus 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

II. Biology, minimum 25 

In order to receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in Biology, the student will be 
expected to have acquired at least the following credits in either his upper division 
undergraduate work or in graduate work: 

15 quarter hours in botany 
15 quarter hours in zoology 
5 quarter hours in cell biology 

If the entering student has had no courses in any of these areas, his graduate program in 
biology must include courses to assure this diversification. Each student must include 5 



48 



quarter hours credit for the course, BIO 630, Biological Sciences in the Secondary 
School, which may be credited as either Biology or Education. 

The student entering the program with previous credits in biology will be required to 
take courses as needed in any of the indicated areas (botany, zoology, cell biology) to 
assure the prescribed minimum diversification. In addition to meeting the minimum 
requirement for diversification, he will elect courses with the advice of his graduate 
advisers to meet the total requirements of 25 hours of biology plus elective to comply 
with item three (III) below. 

III. Electives — Biology and Education 15 

No more than 20 quarter hours of graduate credit may be taken in either field (Biology or 
Education), but this should not be interpreted to restrict any course work which exceeds 
the minimum requirements for the degree. An appropriate course in exceptional chil- 
dren (e.g., EXC 522) must be taken if not taken previously. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one half of their 
required courses and one half of their elective courses at each of the two Colleges. A 
guide to the location of the biology courses follows: 



Savannah State College 


Armstrong State College 


BIO 500 


BIO 525 


BIO 630 


BIO 550 


BIO 540 


ZOO 510 


BIO 501 


BIO 526 


BOT607 


BIO 580 


BIO 510 


ZOO 525 


BIO 502 


BIO 527 


BOT 615 


BIO 605 


BOT 525 


ZOO 529 


BIO 506 


BIO 601 


BOT 625 


BIO 635 


BOT 620 


ZOO 535 


BIO 515 


BIO 609 


BOT 626 


BIO 640 


ZOO 605 


ZOO 645 


BIO 520 


BIO 612 








ZOO 645 



BIO 630 offered at either college 

For location of Education Courses, see the Education Department section of this 
Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in biology, each 
student is required to pass a comprehensive examination covering the 
areas in which he has had course work applicable to his degree. The 
examination may be oral or written. Oral examinations will last no more 
than one and one-half hours; written examinations will last no more than 
three hours. This examination will be completed no later than mid-term of 
the quarter preceding that in which graduation is anticipated. If the 
student should fail the examination, he may be re-examined orally or in 
writing, at the discretion of the departments, in areas of specific weakness 
only. The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date, and time of the examination and the composition of the committee. 
The result of the examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate 
Studies within three days after the examination. 



49 



Graduate Courses in Biology 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Savannah State College: 

BIOLOGY 500. Physiological Ecology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Principles of Ecology and Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological adaptations of 
plants and animals to specific environments. Emphasis will be placed on 
the physiological problems faced by organisms common to the local salt 
marsh and marine environments. 

BIOLOGY 501. General Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Twenty hours of Biological Sciences, Organic Chemistry, and General 
Physics. 

A study of the physics and chemistry of mechanisms underlying func- 
tional occurrences in living organisms, particularly those involved in 
homeostasis. 

BIOLOGY 502. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
General Physiology. 

A systematic study of the functions of the organs in the animal kingdom 
and the physiological principles involved. 

BIOLOGY 506. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General 
and Field Botany and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to cellular and organismal functions important in the life 
of green plants with emphasis on the physical and chemical basis of the 
observed properties and processes. 

BIOLOGY 515. Marine Biology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: General 
Botany and Invertebrate Zoology. 

An introduction to the physiological and ecological biology of microor- 
ganisms, plants, and animals of the sea and its shores. 

BIOLOGY 520. Molecular Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: Princi- 
ples of Genetics and Organic Chemistry. 

The nature and function of genetic material, genetic code and physical 
basis of inheritance. The study also includes genetic control of cellular 
metabolism; mechanism of gene action; genetic capacity for biosynthesis; 
gene enzyme relationship; and chemical nature of agents of heredity. 

BIOLOGY 525. Bacterial Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: Mic- 
robiology and General Physiology. 

A review of current knowledge of bacterial growth and reproduction 
considered at the molecular level. Study of cellular stucture growth- 
kinetics, the synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein, the regulation of 
metabolism and general cellular physiology; the patterns of energy gener- 
ation and biosynthesis and their regulation. 



50 



BIOLOGY 526. Virology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Microbiology. 
A study of the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of the 
viruses with emphasis on the techniques of isolation and cultivation. 

BIOLOGY 527. Mycology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisite: Microbiology. 
A study of the ecology, physiology, and systematica of micro fungi with 
emphasis on those forms of industrial or general economic importance. 

The following courses, open to both graduate and undergraduate 
students, are available at Armstrong State College: 

BOTANY 510. Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Botany 
203 and Organic Chemistry. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants and the 
conditions which affect these processes. 

BOTANY 525. Plant Morphology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisite: Botany 
203. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, struc- 
ture, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 

BIOLOGY 540. Cytology. (2-6-5). ASC. Prerequisite: Two senior divi- 
sion courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differentiation, 
and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 550. Evolution. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisite: major in biology 
(at least 15 quarter hours credit in upper division courses). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 580. General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Two 
upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology). 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the welfare 
of man, coordinated with a study of populations and communities in the 
field. 

ZOOLOGY 510. General Veterbrate Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 525. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. (2-6-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and department head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine inverteb- 
rates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern coastal region. 

ZOOLOGY 529. Endocrinology. (4-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Zoology 
410 and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism and 
reproductive cycles. 



51 



ZOOLOGY 535. Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: 
Zoology 204, and Organic Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ systems 
involved in the maintenance of homestasis under varying conditions within 
normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues and systems under 
laboratory conditions. 

The following courses are open to graduate students only: 

BIOLOGY 601. Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology. (3-4-5). SSC. 
Prerequisites: Complete sequence in Organic Chemistry and Principles of 
Genetics (5 hours). Recommended: Biochemistry and/or Microbiology. 

Concepts of biochemistry and biophysics of cells, nutrition, metabolism 
and energy transfer molecular genetics, cellular anatomy and physiology, 
cytology, and ultrastructure. 

BIOLOGY 609. Advanced Microbiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
Introductory Microbiology or Bacteriology (5 hours) and complete se- 
quence in Organic Chemistry. 

A study of important pathogenic microorganisms producing human dis- 
ease, including characteristics of microorganisms, principles of host- 
parasite relationships, epidemiology, and immunity. Consideration will be 
given to microorganisms in their natural and unnatural environments with 
emhasis on techniques used in evaluation of their presence and affects in 
food, water, and soil. 

BIOLOGY 612. Advanced Genetics. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: Princi- 
ples of Genetics (5 hours) and complete sequence of Organic Chemistry. 

Study of gene structure and gene action from a molecular viewpoint. 
Recent concepts and experimental approaches for recombinational 
analysis, mutagenesis, and metabolism of DNA, RNA and protein will be 
discussed. 

BIOLOGY 630. The Biological Sciences in the Secondary Schools. (3-4- 
5). SSC. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A course designed especially for high school biology teachers. A com- 
prehensive study of national programs for high school biology with special 
emphasis on the BSCS approaches. Laboratory experiences will include 
utilization of actual BSCS materials and apparati. 

BIOLOGY 635. Advanced General Ecology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ites: General Ecology or Plant Ecology or Animal Ecology (5 hours). 
Recommended. Statistics. 

Studies of the processes and functional aspects of population and com- 
munity ecology emphasizing interaction between structure and the envi- 
ronment. Consideration will be given to problems of environmental pollu- 
tion. 



52 



BIOLOGY 640. Cellular Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Com- 
plete sequence in Organic Chemistry and 5 hours of Physiology. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between microscopic 
anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolisms, and 
growth. 

BOTANY 607. Advanced Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequisites: 
One course in Plant Physiology (5 hours) and complete sequence in Organic 
Chemistry. 

Comparative study of nutritional requirements, metabolism, growth 
and development, respiration, photosynthesis, and other processes in 
selected vascular and non-vascular plants. 

BOTANY 615. Comparative Morphology of Non- Vascular Plants. (3-4- 
5). SSC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hours). Recommended: Plant 
Anatomy (5 hours). 

Comparative morphology of non-vascular plants emphasizing identifica- 
tion, life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 

BOTANY 620. Comparative Morphology of Vascular Plants. (3-4-5). 
ASC. Prerequisites: General Botany (10 hours). Recommended: Plant 
Anatomy (5 hours). 

Comparative morphology of vascular plants emphasizing identification, 
life histories, ecology, and evolutionary development. 

BOTANY 625. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. 

BOTANY 625. Field and Laboratory Botany. (3-4-5). SSC. Prerequis- 
ites: General Botany (10 hours) and Plant Systematics (5 hours). 

A two-course sequence designed primarily for teachers, emphasizing 
the identification of local flora (vascular and non- vascular), phylogeny, 
environmental relationships, techniques for collection and preservation, 
and the selection and use of materials for correlating the study of plants 
with other subjects. 

ZOOLOGY 605. Advanced Animal Physiology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ites: One course in General Physioology (5 hours) and complete sequence in 
Organic Chemistry. 

A study concerning functional activities of living organisms including 
humans in terms of both cellular and systemic functions. These topics 
include biological energetics, electrolyte distribution, transport through 
membranes, and colloidal state in biological systems. 

ZOOLOGY 645. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. 

ZOOLOGY 646. Field and Laboratory Zoology. (3-4-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ites: Fifteen hours of biological sciences. 

A two-course sequence designed primarily for teachers, emphasizing 
the identification of local fauna (vertebrate and invertebrate), phylogeny, 



53 



environmental relationships, techniques for collection and preservation, 
and the selection and use of materials for correlating the study of animals 
with other subjects. 

CHEMISTRY 

FACULTY 

Dr. Henry Harris, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Willie Tucker, De- 
partment Head, (SSC); Dr.Brewer, (ASC); Dr. James, (SSC); Dr.Menon, 
(SSC); Dr. Raut, (SSC); Dr. Robbins, (ASC); and Dr. Stratton, (ASC). 

Coordinator — 1978-1979 — Dr. Willie Tucker 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in Chemistry 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in Chemistry must meet the 
general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate Studies Program 
and must take the chemistry- area examination of the National Teacher 
Examinations (NTE) in order to qualify for degree-seeking status. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student will be assigned an academic adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Chemistry Faculty and a professional adviser from the Joint 
Graduate Education Faculty. The student must meet with each of his 
advisers and plan his program under their guidance and should have at 
least one conference per quarter with each adviser. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Education Courses 20 

EDX631 — Social Foundations of Education (ASC). 

EDN 632 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development 

(SSC) or EDN 622— The Nature and Conditions of 

Human Learning (SSC). 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC). 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC). 

II. Chemistry Courses 25 

These courses are selected, in consultation with the student's chemistry adviser from the 
graduate courses in chemistry. 

III. Electives 15 

Electives are to be chosen through advisement and according to individual needs and 
may include courses in chemistry, education, or a suitable third field with the prior 
approval of the student's advisers. An appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g.. 
EXC 522) must be taken if not taken previously. 

54 



IV. Transfer of Credits. 

Students who have earned graduate credits at an accredited institution may transfer a 
limited number of credits to be applied toward the M.Ed, degree in chemistry. Transfer 
of credit is handled on an individual basis. 

V. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirements by taking one half of their 
required courses and one half of their electives courses at the two Colleges. A guide to 
the location of the courses follows: 



Savannah State College 



Armstrong State College 



CHEM 500 
CHEM 541 
CHEM 581 
CHEM 592 
CHEM 600 
CHEM 610 
CHEM 621 



CHEM 631 
CHEM 641 
CHEM 682 
CHEM 692 
CHEM 694 
CHEM 699 



CHEM 522 
CHEM 551 
CHEM 561 
CHEM 591 
CHEM 600 
CHEM 642 



CHEM 662 
CHEM 681 
CHEM 683 
CHEM 691 
CHEM 693 
CHEM 698 



A guide to the campus location of the education courses is in the Education Department 
section of this bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To receive the M.Ed, degree with a concentration in chemistry, each 
student is required to pass a comprehensive examination covering the 
areas in which he has had course work. The examination may be oral or 
written. Oral examinations will last no more than one and one-half hours; 
written examinations will last no more than three hours. This examination 
will be completed no later than mid-term of the quarter preceding that in 
which graduation is anticipated. If the student should fail the examination, 
he may be reexamined orally or in writing, at the discretion of the depart- 
ments, in areas of specific weakness only. The Coordinator shall notify the 
student and the Deans for Graduate Studies ten days prior to the examina- 
tion concerning the proposed place, date, and time of the examination and 
the composition of the committee. The result of the examination will be 
reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within three days after the 
examination. 



55 



Graduate Courses in Chemistry 

CHEMISTRY 500. Introduction to Chemical Research. (2-0-2). SSC. 
This course outlines systematic methods of literature research and 
preparation research outlines from reference to original articles. 

CHEMISTRY 522. Inorganic Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

Modern theory of structures and bonding, acid-base theories, and prop- 
erties of some rare elements and unusual compound will be detailed. The 
latter includes nonstoichiometric compounds, rare gas compounds, and 
coordination complexes. 

CHEMISTRY 541. Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 
Basic organic chemistry to include structures, reactions, and reaction 
mechanisms. 

CHEMISTRY 551. History of Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the present. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of ideas, men who made significant 
contributions, evolution of chemical theories and the modern social impli- 
cations of science. 

CHEMISTRY 561. Biochemistry. (4-3-5). ASC. 

Study of buffers, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids, pro- 
teins, enzymes, the citric acid cycle and other metabolism routes. 

CHEMISTRY 581. Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. 

The basic principles, theories, and application of fundamental analytical 
chemistry are examined. The concepts of dynamic equilibrium, gravimet- 
ric and volumetric analysis are stressed. 

CHEMISTRY 591. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). ASC. 
This course is designed to cover the basic principles of thermodynamics 
and molecular structure and their applications to chemical systems. 

CHEMISTRY 592. Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 591. 

Topics to be discussed will vary and will include subjects such as surface 
chemistry, photochemistry, irreversible processes and crystal structure. 

CHEMISTRY 600. Chemical Research. (0-15-5). SSC or ASC. 
Research under the supervision of a member of the Joint Graduate 
Chemistry Faculty. 

CHEMISTRY 610. Radiochemistry. (2-3-3). SSC. 

A general course dealing with nuclear structure, radioactive properties 
and decay characteristics of radioisotopes, their production and purifica- 
tion. Different types of detection of radiation, identification of 
radioisotopes and their practical applications will also be discussed. 



56 



CHEMISTRY 621. Chemistry for High School Teachers. (4-3-5). SSC. 
This course covers CHEM Study material and also Chemical Bonding 
Approach material for high school teachers. 

CHEMISTRY 631. Development of Chemical Theories. (3-0-3). SSC. 

A study of the basic principles upon which well known chemical theories 
are founded. Topics such as the kinetic molecular theory, chemical equilib- 
ria, and spectroscopy will be discussed. 

CHEMISTRY 641. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). SSC. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 541. 

Discussion of significant principles of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 642. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2-0-2). ASC. 

Discussion of significant principles of chemical bonding, steriochemistry 
and conformation analysis, spectroscopy and similar topics which are ap- 
plicable to an understanding of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 662. Biochemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 561. 

A consideration of the chemical and physical principles employed in the 
study of macromolecules of biological importance. 

CHEMISTRY 681. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 581. 

Advanced theories and methods of analytical chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 682. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. (2-0-2). SSC. 

The current problems facing analytical chemistry are used to coordinate 
and to examine contemporary thought in this field. Problems such as trace 
environmental analysis, analysis of unique materials and non-destructive 
analysis will be treated. 

CHEMISTRY 683. Instrumental Analysis. (2-3-5). ASC. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 581. 

A study of the fundamental principles, construction and operational 
characteristics of modern instrumentation as related to physiochemical 
analytical techniques. Optical, electrometric and chromatograhic separa- 
tion procedures are discussed and practiced. 

CHEMISTRY 691. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 
An advanced study of molecular structure, the physical properties of 
matter and the nature of chemical bonding. 

CHEMISTRY 692. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3-0-3). SSC. 
A primary study of classical thermodynamics and energetics with appli- 
cations to chemical systems. 



57 



CHEMISTRY 693. Quantum Chemistry. (3-0-3). ASC. 

A review of classical mechanics and the rise of wave mechanics. Applica- 
tions of wave mechanics to simple molecules and approximation methods 
will be considered. A conceptual formulation of the quantum theory and 
discussion of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation. 

CHEMISTRY 694. Chemical Kinetics. (3-0-3). SSC. 

A study of rate processes and reaction mechanisms. Topics such as 
theories of reaction rates, activation energies, reactions in solution, 
homogenous and heterogenous catalysis, and experimental method will be 
covered. 

CHEMISTRY 698. Seminar (2-0-2) and Chemistry 699, Seminar (2-0-2). 
ASC and SSC. 

Discussion of selected topics. 

EDUCATION 

FACULTY 

Dr. Thelma Harmond, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. William Stokes, 
Department Head, (ASC); Dr. J. C. Adams, (SSC); Dr. J. V. Adams, 
(ASC); Dr. Agyekum, (SSC); Dr. Barber, (ASC); Dr. Bland, (ASC); Dr. 
Burgess, (SSC); Dr. Cochran, (SSC); Dr. Eaton, (SSC); Dr. Gadsden, 
(SSC); Dr. Lane, (ASC); Dr. Lawson, (SSC); Dr. Newberry, (ASC); Dr. 
Robinson, (SSC); Dr. Sartor, (SSC); Dr. Stephens, (SSC); Dr. Summer, 
(SSC); and Dr. Ward, (ASC). 

Coordinator — 1978-1979, — Dr. William Stokes 

Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education 

In Early Chilhood Education, Elementary Education, and Special 
Education-Behavior Disorders. 

With Programs or Courses Leading to Masters Level Certification for: 

Early Childhood Education K-4 

Elementary Education 4-8 (Middle School) 

Special Education 9-12 (Secondary Education, 

Supervising Teacher Specific Areas) 

Reading Specialist 

OBJECTIVES 

The M.Ed, degrees are designed to provide T-5 certification according to 
levels and specific areas as stipulated by the Georgia State Department of 
Education. Degree programs for specific, secondary areas of certification 
such as history, English, biology, etc. are described in the chapters of this 
catalogue devoted to these content areas. The education department par- 

58 









ticipates in each such program but also offers by itself several programs 
leading to certification, such as Special Education-Behavior Disorders, 
Reading Specialist, etc. The education department heads can provide 
guidance for meeting the certification requirements for newer categories 
of certification (K-4 and 4-8). 

By offering advanced preparation to those who professionally serve in 
schools, the Colleges hope to aid in the development of teachers who 
possess the highest qualities of character, commitment, and professional 
competence. This aim will be facilitated by (1) encouraging the student to 
do scholarly study in advanced professional, specialized and general educa- 
tion subject matter; (2) helping the student become acquainted with the 
most recent research developments in child developments in child growth 
and development and the latest trends in curriculum; (3) deepening his 
appreciation for performance in scientific investigation and research; and 
(4) promoting personal and professional maturity of the student that will 
be reflected in his relationships as he goes about his work in the community 
and in the field of education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the elementary education, the early childhood, and 
the special education programs must satisfy all general admission re- 
quirements of the Joint Graduate Program. Elementary and early child- 
hood education students must submit scores on both the "Commons" and 
the area examinations of the National Teacher Examinations (NTE). 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after admission each student will be assigned an adviser in the 
Department of Education. As soon as he is notified of this assignment, the 
student should schedule an appointment with his adviser to determine any 
conditions and specific requirements the student must meet in order to 
complete both his degree and certification objectives. 

TRANSFER COURSES 

Students should note carefully the general sections on Transfer of 
Graduate Credits and Academic Advisement on pages 26 and 25 and must 
adhere to these requirements; students should also note requirements for 
CATES courses on page 30. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

The Department of Education offers several specialization programs 
under the aegis of the M.Ed, degree in elementary education. These 



59 



specialized programs of study provide, in addition to the graduate major in 
elementary education which leads to T-5 certification in this area, opportu- 
nity for students to qualify for certain other kinds of certification. Students 
should inquire at the Department of Education for certification oppor- 
tunities provided by these specialized programs. 

Graduate students majoring in elementary education must complete a 
minimum of sixty quarter hours of approved courses. These hours are 
divided as follows: Professional Sequence — 20 hours; Specialization 
Courses — 25 hours; and Approved Electives — 15 hours. One course in 
reading must be taken if not taken previously as well as an appropriate 
course in exceptional children if not taken previously. 

The specialized content courses for elementary education may be chosen 
from the following areas: art and music; foreign languages; health and 
physical education; languages arts, including reading, literature, speech, 
linguistics; mathematics and science; and the social studies. Educational 
background, types of teaching experience, specific needs, interests and the 
goals of students will be the deterinants for staff advisement in student 
selection of content areas. Upon the basis of the foregoing factors, students 
may choose specialized courses from two or from several of the content 
areas. 



I. Professional sequence courses 

Required of students in all elementary education programs. 

EDN — 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Develop- 
ment or 

EDN 622 — Nature and Conditions of Human Learning. (Both at 
SSC) 

plus 
EDN 631— Social Fondations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

plus 
EDN 671— Educational Research (ASC) 



Quarter Hours 
20 



II. Courses appropriate to major field and specialization 40 

A. Courses for the conventional major in elementary education. 
1. Major field (content) courses in 

elementary education 25 



Selected, with avisement, from the following courses: 

EDN 540 — Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 

School (ASC) 
EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) 
EDN 542 — Reading and Literature for Children 

(SSC) 
EDN 591 — Science for Elementary and ECE 

Teachers (ASC) 



60 



EDN 601 — The Language Arts in the Educative 

Process (SSC) 
EDN 642 — Seminar in Elementary Education 

(SSC) 
EDN 643— Problems in Reading (SSC) 
EDN 691 — Environmental Science (ASC) 
EDN 696 — Geography for Elementary Teachers 

(SSC) 
EDN 697— Social Studies for Elementary and ECE 

Teachers (ASC) 
MATH/EDN 592— Modern Mathematics for 

Elementary and ECE Teachers (ASC) 
ZOO/EDN 692— Zoology for Elementary Teachers 

(SSC) 
BOT/EDN 693— Botany for Elementary Teachers 

(SSC) 
CHEM/EDN 694— Chemistry for Elementary 

Teachers (SSC) 
PSci/EDN 695— Earth Science for Elementary 

Teachers (SSC) 

2. Electives 15 

Elective courses selected with advisement. 

B. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization in early 
childhood education. 

1. Major field courses in elementary education 25 

Same as in A above. 

2. Specified electives only; prescribed courses are: 15 

EDN 627— Child Growth and Development (ASC) 
EDN 647 — Curriculum for Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (SSC) 
EDN 802— Practicum in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (ASC or SSC) 

C. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization in 
supervising teacher services. * 

1. Major field courses in elementary education 25 

Same as in A above. 

2. Specific electives only; prescribed courses are: 15 

EDN 581 — Directing and Evaluating Student 

Teaching * 
EDN 582 — Internship for Supervising Teachers * 
EDN 583 — Seminar in Supervision * 

D. Courses for a major in elementary education with a specialization in 
reading. 

1. Specialization courses in reading 25 

Selected, with advisement, from the following 
courses; other courses not listed here may be iden- 
tified by advisement. 

EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) 
EDN 643— Problems in Teaching Reading (SSC) 
EDN 644 — Issues in Diagnosing and Prescribing in 
the Reading process (SSC) 



'See departmental section on balance of courses. 

61 



EDN 653— Remedial Reading (Practicum) (ASC) 
EDN 654 — Organization and Supervision of the 

Reading Program (ASC) 
EDN 545— Reading in the Secondary School (SSC) 

Approved electives 

These courses specified by the Education Depart- 
ment to insure meeting elementary education major 
requirements. 



15 



III. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows these program outlines. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Quarter hours 
I. Professional Sequence Courses 20 

Same as Elementary Education Professional Sequence 

EDN 621 or EDN 622 EDN 641 

EDN 631 EDN 671 

II. Courses appropriate to the early childhood education major 40 

A. Content courses to cover diversified areas 25 

1. Two courses from: 10 

EDN 540 — Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 
School and ECE (ASC) 

EDN 541— Methods of Teaching Reading (ASC) — 
required if a reading course not taken previ- 
ously. 

EDN 542 — Reading and Literature for Children 
(SSC) 

2. Three courses from: 15 

EDN 591— Science for Elementary and ECE 

Teachers (ASC) 
MATH/EDN 592— Modern Mathematics for 

Elementary and ECE Teachers (ASC) 
EDN 628 — Movement Exploration and Motor 

Learning in Children (SSC) 
EDN 658 — Creative Activities in Art, Music, 

Dance, and Drama (SSC) 
EDN 691— Environmental Science (ASC) 
EDN 697— Social Studies for Elementary and ECE 

Teachers (ASC) 

B. Required Courses 15 

EDN 627— Child Growth and Development (ASC) 
EDN 647— Curriculum for ECE (SSC) or EDN 

657— Methods for ECE (ASC) 
EDN 802— Practicum in ECE (ASC or SSC) 



62 



If the requirement for exceptional children (EXC 522 at SSC) has not been met, then the 
student must meet it even if it means taking courses beyond the basic 60 hours for the 
degree. 

III. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows these program outlines. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
SPECIAL EDUCATION— BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 

Quarter Hours 
I. Professional Sequence 20 

Same as Elementary Education Professional Sequence 

EDN 621 or EDN 622 EDN 641 

EDN 631 EDN 671 

II. Specialization Courses 30 

EXC 522 EXC 685 EXC 700 may be taken in lieu 

EXC 680 EXC 686 of 685, 686, and 687, but five 

EXC 681 EXC 687 additional elective hours are 

needed to compensate for lost 
hours (EXC 700 is only a 10- 
hour credit course). 

III. Electives 10 

A course in the teaching of reading must be taken if not taken previously. 

EXC 525 EXC 623 EXC 673 

EXC 526 EXC 654 EDN 653 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of these elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows these program outlines. 

COURSES FOR INTERRELATED 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Several courses in exceptional children contribute to the needs of 
specialists in Interrelated Special Education. Specific courses in this area 
include EXC 522, EXC 641, EXC 682, EXC 683, and EXC 684. For 
additional information regarding the contribution that these courses may 
make toward certification and professional needs, contact the Education 
Department. 

BALANCE OF COURSES FOR 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT COURSES 

*The educational supervision courses, EDN 581, 582, and 583, are open 
only to students who receive special permission to enroll in them. These 
courses deal with the preparation of teachers for the supervision of student 

63 



teaching, an undergraduate activity on each campus. The departments on 
each campus may arrange for team teaching with a represenative from 
each College. 

* * Courses with a double asterisk are offered at both Colleges. 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Professional Sequence Courses 

END 621 or 622 EDN 631 

END 641 EDN 631 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

Content Courses for Elementary Education 



EDN 542 


ZOO/EDN 692 


EDN 540 


EDN 691 


EDN 601 


BIO/EDN 693 


EDN 541 


EDN 697 


EDN 642 


PSi/EDN 695 


EDN 591 


MATH/EDN 592 


EDN 643 


CHEM/EDN 694 






EDN 696 












Additional Courses for Elementary Education Programs 


EDN 543 


EDN 644 


EDN 703 


EDN 521 


EDN 653 EDN 702 


EDN 611 


EDN 661 


EDN 673 * * 


EDN 551 


EDN 654 EDN 673 


EDN 632 


EDN 662 


EDN 700 * * 


EDN 625 


EDN 672 EDN 700 



EDN 651 

EDN 581, *, EDN 582 *, and EDN 583 * 

Early Childhood Education Courses 

EDN 628 EDN 627 

EDN 637 EDN 638 

EDN 647 EDN 657 

EDN 658 EDN 802 * * 
EDN 802 * * 

Special Education Courses 



EXC 623 


EXC 681 


EXC654 


EXC 683 


EXC 641 





EXC 522 EXC 536 

EXC 525 EXC 680 

EXC 682 

NOTE: EXC 685, EXC 686, and EXC 687 may be taken at both Colleges but at least one of these three courses must be taken 
at each College if used for the B.A. degree. EXC 684 available at both colleges. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

A committee of the faculty of the Joint Graduate Education Department 
will administer an oral examination to all candidates for the Master's 
degree. The chairman of the examining committee will be the student's 
adviser. The student and his adviser will select the other two members of 
the examining committee. This committee will have at least one represen- 



64 



tative from each of the two campuses. The committee should also have a 
representative from one of the content areas on the student's degree plan. 

The chairman will select, in consultation with the student, the date, 
time, and place for the examination and will report this information and the 
results of the examination to the Coordinator. 

The Coordinator shall notify the Deans for Graduate Studies ten days 
prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, data and time of 
the examination and the composition of the Committee. The result of the 
examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within 
three days after the examination. 

Graduate Courses in Education 

EDUCATION 521. Tests and Measurements. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Principles and procedures in evaluating pupil growth. 

EDUCATION 540. Teaching Language Arts in Elementary School. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

Exploration in the four broad areas of the language arts. Investigation of 
pertinent research of the past decade; opportunities for enriching experi- 
ences with media through demonstration. 

EDUCATION 541. Method of Teaching Reading. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Basic priiiiinciples and methods underlying the elementary school read- 
ing program. 

EDUCATION 542. Reading and Literature for Children. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is designed to acquaint elementary teachers with the 
stimulating language environment of the wide world of literature for 
children. The literature approach of language learning seeks to assist the 
teacher in guiding children to become active, sensitive learners who seek 
to explore, inquire, and discover. 

EDUCATION 545. Reading in the Secondary School. (5-0-5). SSC. 
This course is designed to acquaint teachers with teaching reading in 
content areas. 

EDUCATION 551. Newer Teaching Media I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

The first course in a two-course sequence. Multisensory learning and the 
utilization of audiovisual materials, newer teaching hardware, and pro- 
grammed materials. 

EDUCATION 581. Directing and Evaluating Student Teaching. (5 
quarter hours). ASC and SSC. 

Information, skills and understandings required for effective supervi- 
sion of student teachers. Selected teachers. 

EDUCATION 582. Internship for Supervising Teachers. (5 quarter 
hours.) SSC and ASC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 



65 



Cooperative field experience involving public school teachers, student 
teachers, college personnel. 

EDUCATION 583. Seminar in Supervision. (5 quarter hours). ASC and 

ssc. 

An opportunity for experienced supervising teachers to evaluate 
criteria and to develop plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 

EDUCATION 591. Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Opportunities for acquiring basic knowledge in science appropriate for 
the elementary grades. 

EDUCATION 601. The Language Arts in the Educative Process. (5-0- 
5). SSC. 

Provisions for an examination of language developments. Current issues 
and recent research in the language arts curriculum. Theoretically and 
practically, students will be aided in finding adequate solutions to language 
problems which confront them in the daily teaching experience. 

EDUCATION 661. Philosophy and History of Education. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Modern philosophical systems and their impact on educational theory 
and practice. 

EDUCATION 621. Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Develop- 
ment. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A comprehensive view of human growth and development with em- 
phasis upon the recent literature in these fields. 

EDUCATION 622. The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

An advanced study of the various theories of learning with emphasis 
upon the latest ideas in this field. 

EDUCATION 625. Contemporary Problems in Educational Psychol- 
ogy. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequisites: Two or more courses in psychology or 
sociology or a combination of the two. 

A seminar to explore contemporary problems of a psycho-social nature 
affecting education. 

EDUCATION 631. Social Foundations of Education. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Basic graduate course in the contribution of the social sciences to educa- 
tion, focused on the significant issues and problems of education. 

EDUCATION 632. Education and Minority Group Problems. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A study of intergroup education related to the problems of American 
ethnic, racial, and religious minorities. 

EDUCATION 641. Curriculum Planning. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Trends, issues, and understandings needed for curriculum development 
and teaching. 

66 



EDUCATION 642. Seminar in Elementary Education. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Opportunities to analyze issues, theories and practices in elementary 
education. 

EDUCATION 643. Problems in Reading. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Investigation of problems met in the teaching of reading. 

E DUC ATION 644. Issues in Diagnosing and Prescribing in the Reading 
Process. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisites: EDN 541, EDN 643, or approval of 
instructor. 

Designed to evaluate primary issues in differentiated instruction. 
Examination of techniques employed in diagnosing and prescribing for 
reading difficulties. 

EDUCATION 651. Newer Teaching Media II. (5-0-5). ASC. Prerequis- 
ite: EDN 551. 

An advanced course contininung in-depth study of newer teaching 
media. 

EDUCATION 653. Remedial Reading. (Practicum). (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: EDN 644 or approval of instructor. 

A study of the various methods and materials utilized to test and teach 
remedial readers. The student will be required to tutor one poor reader. 

EDUCATION 661. Principles and Practices of Guidance. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An introduction to the philosophy and procedures of guidance in both the 
elementary and secondary school. 

EDUCATION 662. Guidance in Elementary School. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Application of the guidance point of view and guidance techniques to the 
elementary school classroom. Emphasis is upon the teacher's role in 
cooperating with professional guidance workers. 

EDUCATION 671. Educational Research. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Methodology of educational research and its application to instruction 
and guidance. 

EDUCATION 672. Field Project. (5 hours credit). SSC. 
An "on-the-job" research project dealing with improvement in the stu- 
dent's specific situation. 

EDUCATION 673. Individual Research. (5 hours credit). ASC or SSC. 

EDUCATION 675. Individual Study in Education. (1 to 5 hours). ASC. 
Opportunities provided for supervised research and independent study in 
selected areas. Research and reading in education to meet the needs of 
students involved. Designed for students with a knowledge of research. 
All work offered on an individual basis with the approval of department 
chairman, advisor, and instructor concerned. Prerequisite: EDN 671. 



67 






EDUCATION 676. Individual Study in Education. (5 hours). SSC. 
Advanced individual study similar to EDN 695. Approval of department 
chairman, advisor, and instructor concerned necessary. Prerequisites: 
EDN 671. 

EDUCATION 691. Environmental Science. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Exploration of science principles through problem-solving. Designed to 
make environmental science situations meaningful. 

ZOO/EDN 692. Zoology for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Modern approaches to teaching the biological sciences. Emphasis on 
understanding of life processes in the animal kingdom. 

BOT/EDN 693. Botany for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lecture — laboratory course dealing with principles involved in classify- 
ing and indentifying plant life. 

CHEM/EDN 694. Chemistry for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A study of the more important metallic and non-metallic elements with 
emphasis on practical application at the elementary school level. 

PSci/EDN 695. Earth Science for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Composition of earth, classification and identification of rocks and min- 
erals. 

EDUCATION 696. Geography for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A critical examination of instructional procedures and techniques in 
teaching geography in elementary grades. Selection, organization and 
presentation of structured facts of human environment, both cultural and 
physical. Emphasis given to the conceptual approach in the analysis of 
space and regional interaction. 

EDUCATION 697. Social Studies for Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

Investigation of newer approaches to social studies teaching. Emphasis 
on related skills as map and graph reading. Analysis of behavioral objec- 
tives for social studies teaching. 

EDUCATION 700. Internship. (10 hours credit). ASC or SSC. (Grade 
awarded, S or U only.) 

Students who hold teaching positions in schools and/or clinic settings will 
be supervised by college staff members for one academic year. Supervisors 
will observe and hold conferences with each candidate. Students must 
complete one academic year to receive credit. 

EDUCATION 702. Seminar in Education for Staff Development. (Vari- 
able credit). ASC. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an 
approved staff development activity sponsored by a local school system. 
Admission to the course must be approved by the student's adviser and by 
the department head. 

68 



This course is designed to provide a framework through which teachers 
and local school systems, in conjunction with the college, may offer 
graduate credit for approved staff development activities. Credit for this 
course may be approved for either content or elective work. 

With a change in content, this course may be repeated for additional 
credit. 

EDUCATION 703. Seminar in Education for Staff Development. (Vari- 
able credit). SSC. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in an 
approved staff development activity sponsored by a local school system. 
Admission to the course must be approved by the student's adviser and by 
the department head. 

This course is designed to provide a framework through which teachers 
and local school systems, in conjunction with the college, may offer 
graduate credit for approved staff development activities. Credit for this 
course may be approved for either content or elective work. 

With a change in content, this course may be repeated for additional 
credit. 

EDUCATION 000. School Evaluation. (5 to 10). ASC or SSC. 
Study of school assessment procedures, self study and followup. 

Graduate Courses in Education - 
Early Childhood Education 

EDN 627. Child Growth and Development. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Lecture and laboratory. Basic concepts and problems of child develop- 
ment; observation, behavior patterns, child study. 

EDN 628. Movement Exploration and Motor Learning in Children. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Develop understandings, skills, and teaching techniques and methods in 
the basic activities appropriate to the teacher of movement education. 

EDN 637. Foundations of Early Childhood Education. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Historical developments, philosophy and objectives of nursery schools, 
kindergartens, and day care centers; exploration of teacher-child and 
teacher-family interactions, diagnosis and evaluation of children. 

EDN 638. The Young Child and His Family, School, Community. (5-0- 
5). ASC. 

Interaction with community for services and resources. Family study 
from many different angles, utilizing data from various fields, developing 
skills in procedures and tecdniques for working with parents. 

EDN 647. Early Childhood Education Curriculum. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Content, approaches, methods and materials appropriate for young 
child as presented in interdisciplinary or experience approach emphasizing 
how language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, and the creative 
arts are adopted to skills and needs of children. 

69 



EDN 657. Early Childhood Education Methods. (5-0-5). ASC. 

A study of research and programs for children under eight and implica- 
tions for program development. Developing skills in translating concepts 
into classroom practice for young children. 

EDN 658. Creative Activities in Art, Music, Dance and Drama. (5-0-5). 

ssc. 

Course focuses on activities in each of four areas and presented in an 
interdisciplinary approach. 

EDN 802. Practicum in Early childhood Education. (5 hours credit). 
ASC or SSC. (Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Supervised experience in classroom with children under six. Seminars 
and projects planned according to students' needs. 

Graduate Courses in Education - 
Exceptional Children 

EXC 522. Introduction to Exceptional Children. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An introductory study of the identification, diagnosis, and education of 
the atypical child. 

EXC 525. Mental Hygiene in Teaching. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A consideration of the forces and influences on what constitutes normal 
behavior in personal and social relationships within the school setting. 
Student behavior, teacher behavior, and student-teacher interaction 
dynamics will receive major attention. Open to qualified undergraduate 
students, graduate students, and teachers seeking renewal of certificates. 

EXC 526. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. (5-0-5). SSC. 

EXC 623. Assessment and Measurement of the Exceptional Child. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

This course will emphasize the means and interpretations of psychologi- 
cal, psychiatric, educational, and other evaluations. It will attempt to help 
the teacher understand and make relevant the test specialists' report. 

EXC 641. Teaching of Reading to Exceptional Children. (3-4-5). ASC. 

First half of course consists of classroom instruction in procedures for 
teaching reading. Second half of course consists of tutoring an exceptional 
child in reading under the instructor's supervision. 

EXC 654. Behavioral Intervention Procedures for Children. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

To acquaint students with historical background, developments, con- 
cepts, definitions, terminology, and techniques of behavioral intervention, 
as well as application of such procedures. 

EXC 673. Independent Research. (5-0-5). ASC or SSC. 



70 



EXC 680. Behavior Pathology in Children. (5-0-5). SSC. Prerequisite: 
EXC 522. 

A study of the epidemeology, etiology, prognosis, and treatment of 
behavior disorders in children. An extensive examination of the social 
milieu will characterize the course. 

EXC 681. Education of the Emotionally Disturbed. (5-0-5). ASC. Pre- 
requisite: EXC 680. 

The student will survey the various types of programs and approaches 
historically and currently in operation for the emotionally disturbed child. 
Emphasis will be placed on those programs within the public school set- 
ting. 

EXC 682. Nature of Learning Disabilities and Mental Retardation. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

Definitions, orientation, characteristics, assessement, contributions of 
major authorities, and terminology for the learning disabled child. In- 
depth study of the psychological and sociological aspects of educationally 
handicapping conditions and of the children who display those conditions 
for the mentally retarded child. 

EXC 683. Methods and Materials for Teaching Learning Disabled and 
Mentally Retarded Children. (3-4-5). ASC. 

Procedures for identifying strengths and weaknesses of students, using 
multisensory approaches, analyzing tasks into component parts, designing 
and using instructional materials, writing instructional objectives, and 
individualizing classroom instruction. 

EXC 684. Practicum in Learning Disabilities, Behavior Disorders, and 
Mental Retardation. (0-10-5). SSC or ASC. 

The student will be required to interact with students from all three 
areas for a minimum of 10 clock hours per week. In those cases where 
students cannot be placed in a program serving all three categories of 
children, the student will be required to spend one third of the quarter with 
children from each area. The student will be expected to have direct 
involvement in teaching exceptional children. 

EXC 685-686-687. Practicum in Special Education (5 hours credit each 
course). (Grades awarded, S or U only.) 

EXC 685. Five hours to be taken among the first twenty-five hours of 
the student's program. During this time the student will be required to 
interact with behavior disordered and/or multiple handicapped children a 
minimum of eight clock hours per week in programs designed to ameliorate 
the disability. It is recommended that the student participate in two or 
more programs. ASC or SSC. 

EXC 686. Prerequisite: EXC 685. Five quarter hours of individual 
studies under the direction of the student's adviser, or the adviser's desig- 
nate, to be taken prior to the five final hours of practicum. The individual 

71 



studies program will be designed so that the student develops proficiency 
in a minimum of one mode of treatment for behavior disordered children. 
The student will be required not only to develop expertise in a theoretical 
approach but be afforded the opportunity to interact with a student, or 
students, in tutorial situations for practical applications of the theoretical 
model selected for study. ASC or SSC. 

EXC 687. Prerequisite: EXC 686. Five hours taken during the terminal 
stages of the student's program. The student will be required to serve a 
minimum of ten clock hours per week in facilities designed for behavior 
disordered and/or multiple handicapped children. The student will be 
expected to have direct involvement in teaching exceptional children. A 
portion of this five quarter hours must be served in a residential facility. 
ASC or SSC. 

EXC 700. Internship. (10 hours credit). ASC or SSC. (Grade awarded, S 
or U only.) See EDN 700 for general requirements; course runs one 
academic year. 

ENGLISH 

FACULTY 

Dr. Luetta Milledge, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Hugh Pendex- 
ter, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Brooks, (ASC); Dr. Daub, (SSC); Dr. 
Jones, (ASC); Dr. Killorin, (ASC); Dr. Lawson, (ASC); Dr. Lunz, (SSC); 
Dr. Maher, (SSC); Dr. O'Neil, (SSC); Dr. Propst, (ASC); Dr. Stevenson, 
(SSC); and Dr. Strozier, (ASC). 

Coordinator — 1978-1979 — Dr. Luetta Milledge 

Program of Study Leading to the Degree 
Master of Education in English 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of English, in cooperation with the Department of 
Education, offers two programs of study leading to the Master of Educa- 
tion degree with concentrations in English, one a certifiable option and one 
a non-certifiable option. The objectives of the certifiable program of study 
are: 

1. To upgrade the teaching of secondary school English by increasing 
the competencies of English teachers in the areas of linguistics, 
composition, and literature; 

2. To enable teachers of English in Secondary schools to pursue study 
that will enrich their skills, knowledge, and understanding in the 
teaching of language, composition, and literature; 



72 



3. To provide opportunities for professional growth -And cultural en- 
richment for individuals holding the bachelor's degree but having no 
further degree or citification objectives; 

4. To enable teachers of English in secondary schools to qualify for the 
T-5 certificate. 

The English Department also offers a non-certifiable M. Ed. degree with 
some different objectives and requirements. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

All students entering the M.Ed, program in English must present, in 
addition to the general requirements, the Graduate Record Examination 
Advanced Test in Literature and English, although no minimum score is 
prescribed. 

ADVISEMENT 

Each student admitted to the program in English will be assigned an 
academic adviser from the English Department and a professional adviser 
from the Education Department. As soon as the student is. notified of this 
assignment, he should arrange for a conference with his advisers. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Summary of Requirements for Certification Program 

(Requirements for the non-certification program available in the En- 
glish Department.) 

Quarter Hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 20 

II. English Courses (required, plus eleetives) 35 

III. Elective Courses 5 

IV. Balance of Courses 

I. Professional Education Courses 20 

EDN 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth and Development (SSC) or 

EDN 622 — The Nature and Conditions of Human Learning (SSC) 

plus 
EDN 631 — Social Fondations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDN 641 — Curriculum Planning (SSC) plus 

EDN 671 — Education Research (ASC) 

II. English Courses 35 

A. A student may count no more than 15 hours of 500 level work toward the degree. 

B. English 620, 621, and 622 are required of all students. 

C. English 500, 503, 690, and 691 may be taken twice if the course is offered a second 
time with a different topic. 

III. Elective Course 5 

Because the courses in the teaching of reading and in exceptional children are required 
for certification, a student must present at least one of these as part of his undergraduate 

73 






record before he will be admitted to candidacy for the M.Ed, degree in English or must 
present the equivalent graduate course in addition to the sixty (60) hours normally 
required in the M.Ed, program. 

IV. Balance of Courses. 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one-half of their 
required courses and one-half of their elective courses at each College. A guide to the 
location of the courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 



ENG 503 


ENG 642 


ENG 500 


ENG 641 


ENG 621 


ENG 660 


ENG 630 


ENG 650 


ENG 622 


ENG 665 


ENG 625 


ENG 662 


ENG 626 


ENG 666 


ENG 627 


ENG 664 


ENG 630 


ENG 691 


ENG 631 
ENG 640 


ENG 690 



A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the Education Department 
section of this Bulletin. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Each candidate for the Master of Education degree with a concentration 
in English must pass a written comprehensive examination. The com- 
prehensive examination will be based on the reading list in language and 
literature which must be secured by the student at the time of his matricu- 
lation. The student may choose to be examined under any reading list in 
force during the time of his enrollment. Copies of the reading list are 
available in the office of the Coordinator. For more specific information 
concerning the comprehensive examination, contact the Coordinator. 

The comprehensive examination covers two areas: 1) literature before 
1800 and 2) literature after 1800. The separate examinations are to be 
taken in the course of the student's program, preferably before the last 
quarter. At least one of the tests in literature will include a question 
concerning bibliographical and research procedures. The student must 
pass both examinations in order to receive his degree. After two unsuc- 
cessful attempts at any one part of the examination, a student may not 
apply to repeat that section for at least two quarters during which he may 
do guided study to take recommended courses in order to make up his 
deficiencies. In light of the comprehensive requirements, the student is 
strongly urged to take an additional course in linguistics. Except for the 
stipulation that he must wait at least two quarters if he fails any examina- 
tion twice, there is no limit on the number of times that a student may take 
an examination. Examination results are designated S or U. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date and time of the examination and the composition of the committee. 
The result of the examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate 
Studies within seven days after the examination. 



74 






Graduate Courses i?i English 

Graduate admission status is prerequisite to enrollment in any graduate 
course in English. 

ENGLISH 500. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours credit). ASC. 

ENGLISH 503. Special Topics. (1 to 5 hours credit). SSC. 

ENGLISH 620. Practical Criticism I. (5-0-5). ASC. 

Composition and literary theory will constitute the basis for practical 
criticism of literary works. The relationship between literary theory and 
problems of teaching composition and literary interpretation will be 
explored, and various contexts (i.e., formalistic, socio-historical, ar- 
chetypal) for interpreting the work of literature will be examined. Course 
requirements will include oral and written analysis of literary works writ- 
ten before 1800, selected primarily from the Graduate English reading list. 

ENGLISH 621. Practical Criticism II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Course description is the same as ENG 620 above, but utilizes literary 
works written after 1800, selected primarily from the graduate English 
reading list. 

ENGLISH 622. Approaches to Language. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A survey of the components of language study as well as the various 
approaches to language, meaning, and syntax. Relationships between the 
teacher's language study and classroom implementation of various facets 
of it will be explored. 

ENGLISH 625. Chaucer. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 626. Shakespeare. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 627. Milton. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 630. American Literature to 1840. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 631. American Literature, 1840-1912. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 640. British Literature, Before 1660. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 641. British Literature, 1660-1830. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 642. British Literature, 1830-1912. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 650. British and American Literature, 1912 to the Present. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 660. Studies in Ethnic Literature. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 662. Literature: Its Intellectual Backgrounds. (5-0-5). ASC. 

ENGLISH 664. Studies in Comparative Literature. (5-0-5). ASC. 



75 



ENGLISH 665. Discriptive Linguistics and Transformational Gram- 
mar. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the English sound system, the system of word composition 
and transformational syntax. 

ENGLISH 666. Historical Linguistics. (5-0-5). SSC. 

ENGLISH 690. Special Studies: Independent Study or Seminar (1 to 5 
hours credit). ASC. 

ENGLISH 691. Special Studies: Inependent Study or Seminar. (1 to 5 
hours credit). SSC. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FACULTY 

Dr. Isaiah Mclver, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Roger Warlick, De- 
partment Head, (ASC). 

History 

Dr. Arens, (ASC); Dr. Duncan, (ASC); Dr. Gross, (ASC); Dr. Lanier, 
(ASC); Dr. Patterson, (ASC); Dr. Sanford (SSC); Dr. Simpson, (SSC); and 
Dr. Smith, (SSC); Dr. Stewart, (SSC); Dr. Stone, (ASC). 

Political Science 

Dr. Byers, (SSC); Dr. Clark, (ASC); Dr. Coyle, (ASC); Dr. Harris, 
(SSC); Dr. McCarthy, (ASC); Dr. Newman, (ASC); Dr. Rhee, (ASC); and 
Dr. Walton, (SSC). 

Coordinator — 1978-1979 — Dr. Roger Warlick 

Programs of Study Leading to the Degree 

Master of Education in History 

and in Political Science 

I. M.Ed. PROGRAMS LEADING TOWARD CERTIFICATION (T-5) 
IN HISTORY AND IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate programs in history and in political 
science are: 

1. To increase the academic and professional skills, the competence and 
the enthusiasm of secondary teachers in history and political science 
and in social studies generally. 

2. To increase the teacher's knowledge and understanding of the nature 
and conditions of learning and the learner, at the same time making 



76 



the teacher aware of the major features and problems of secondary 
education in the American social order. 

3. To accomplish these objectives by working jointly in a situation 
reflective of the racial and social make-up of American society and, in 
so doing, to provide a context in which teachers themselves may 
develop personally as well as academically. 

ADMISSION REQUIRExMENTS 

Students entering the M.Ed, program in history or in political science 
must satisfy all general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program, including the requirement that the GRE Aptitude or 
XTE Common, and an appropriate advanced or area test, be completed 
prior to full admission. The results of these examinations will then serve as 
a basis for academic advisement. 

Students must also satisfy a prerequisite of 15 quarter hours of under- 
graduate work in the major discipline before any course in that discipline 
can be taken for graduate credit. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS 

A. Major in History 

The typical history program for those students already holding a T-4 certificate in an 
appropriate field is outlined below: 

Quarter Hours 
Minimum 

1. History Courses 30 

2. Professional Education Courses 20 

EDX 622 — Nature and Conditions of Human Learning, (SSC) or 

EDX 621 — Advanced Studies in Human Growth & Development 

plus 
EDX 631 — Social Foundations of Education (ASC) 

plus 
EDX 641— Curriculum Planning (SSC) 

plus 
EDX 671— Educational Research (ASC) 

3. Approved Electives 10 

An appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) 

must be taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 

B. Major in Political Science. 

The typical political science program for those students already holding a T-4 certificate in 
an appropriate field is outlined below: 

1. Political Science Courses 30 

These courses must include 5 hours in each of the following areas: 

a. American government and public policy. 

b. Comparative politics. 

c. International relations and foreign policy. 

d. Political theory. 

77 



2. Professional Education Courses 20 

Same as Professional Education courses for History. 
EDN 621 or EDN 622 plus EDN 631 plus EDN 641, plus EDN 671 

3. Approved Electives 10 

Appropriate course in exceptional children (e.g., EXC 522) 

must be taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 

C. Special program (for students without T-4 certification). Students without prior certifica- 
tion may need 70-80 hours to complete the M.Ed, program in either History or Political 
Science. An illustrative program is shown below, but the student will need individual 
guidance. 

1 . Professional Education 40 

a. Foundations Courses 10 

EDN 611, EDN 622, EDN 631 

b. Methods and Curriculum 10 

EDN 641 and others 

c. Educational Research — EDN 671 5 

d. Student teaching or equivalent on-the-job 

experience — workshops, etc 10 

e. Electives 5 

2. History or Political Science Courses 30 

See section below on "Use of Electives" for further 
information on hours in the major field. 

D. General Requirements. 

Use of Electives 

The flexibility provided by the 10 hours of "Approved Electives" normally makes it 
possible to meet the other program guidelines within a 60-hour total. But, students should 
be aware, for example, that counting both graduate and undergraduate classwork, they 
are required to have a total of at least 30 hours in their major teaching area (i,e. , American 
or European History, or American Government). There may also be areas where under- 
graduate preparation was weak or unavailable, such as professional education, non- 
western traditions, etc. Such problems can best be solved on an individual basis with the 
help of the faculty adviser. 

Students should be aware that regardless of their major, state certification criteria 
recommend that social studies teachers include in their programs preparation in the 
following: American history and government, conflicting ideologies, the modern world, 
Western heritage, and non-Western traditions. 

II. M.Ed. PROGRAMS IN HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(WITHOUT CERTIFICATION) 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Besides the general admission requirements of the Joint Graduate 
Studies Program, students who desire to obtain an M.Ed, in history or 
political science without certification are required to take the GRE area 
test in history or political science and obtain a minimum score of 450 in 
history or 410 in political science to gain full admission to the program 
(Regular Admission status). A student who does not meet the minimum 

78 



score on the area examination will be required to take two recommended 
undergraduate courses on the 300 or 400 level (one on each campus) and 
pass them with at least B's before being granted regular status. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-CERTIFICATION PRO- 
GRAMS 

Quarter Hours 

A. Major in History 

1 . History courses 40 

a. History 500 will be required of all students unless an equivalent undergraduate 
course has already been taken (History 300 (ASC), or, History 416 (SSC), would 
satisfy this requirement). 

b. At least one five (5) hour course must be taken in each of the following fields: 

1. U.S. History 

2. European History 

3. Other (e.g., Russian, Far Eastern, and Latin America). 

c. With the approval of the adviser 10 of these hours may be taken in appropriate 
political science courses. 

NOTE: Combined graduate plus undergraduate work in the area(s) of concentra- 
tion (either European or U.S. History) must total at least 30 hours. 

2. Education courses 15 

Fifteen hours of Education courses are to be taken with at least five (5) hours on each 
campus. These courses are to be chosen with the advice of the student's major area 
adviser from a list designated by the Education Department. 

3. Free Electives 5 

An appropriate course chosen with the advice of the adviser. 

Total 60 

B. Major in Political Science. 

1 . Political Science courses 40 

a. Ten hours each must be taken in the following areas: 

1. American Government 

2. Comparative politics 

3. International relations and foreign policy 

4. Political theory 

2. Education courses 15 

Fifteen hours of Education courses are to be taken with at least five hours on each 
campus. These courses are to be chosen with the advice of the student's major area 
adviser from a list designated by the Education Department. 

3. Free Elective 5 

An appropriate course chosen with the advice of the adviser. (Unless an approved 
undergraduate political science methodology course has been taken, students must 
take Political Science 600. This requirement may be met under I-b above, if permitted, 

or under III, or as an extra course.) 

Total 60 



79 



III. GENERAL INFORMATION — ALL PROGRAMS IN HISTORY 
and POLITICAL SCIENCE 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Students who have earned graduate credits at one or more accredited 
institutions may, under certain circumstances, transfer a limited number 
of quarter hours of such credits to be applied toward the M.Ed, degree 
programs in history and political science. Such transfer of credits is hand- 
led on an individual basis and requires the written approval of the student's 
adviser and the Coordinator. 

ADVISEMENT 

Shortly after his admission to the program in either history or political 
science, each student should contact the Coordinator to secure an adviser. 
As soon as he is notified of his assigned adviser, the student should arrange 
for a conference with his adviser and begin planning his degree program. 
Failure by the student to consult regularly with his adviser may greatly 
lengthen the time necessary to complete the program. Each student should 
feel free to consult his adviser as often as is necessary. 

COMPREHESIVE EXAMINATION 

An integral part of the graduate experience is the achievement of a 
comprehensive understanding of the analytical skills and of the current 
state of knowledge and scholarship basic to one's field. It is the purpose of 
the Comprehensive Examination both to demonstrate this understanding 
and to aid in further synthesizing its many aspects. Thus, the examination 
itself should be in part a new experience, producing new insights and not 
merely a rehearsal of previous ones. 

Satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations, both the re- 
quired written and the optional oral, will be required of all degree candi- 
dates. Candidates should notify their major porfessor and the Coordinator 
of the program of their readiness to be examined at the time they apply for 
the degree — i.e. , no later than mid-term of their next-to-final quarter. At 
this time the specific fields and reading list to be covered will be defined, 
the make-up of the examining committee determined, and the date of the 
exam set. The examination normally occurs before mid-term of the stu- 
dent's final quarter. 

The Coordinator shall notify the student and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies ten days prior to the examination concerning the proposed place, 
date, and time of the examination and the composition of the Committee. 
The result of the examination will be reported to the Deans for Graduate 
Studies within three days after the examination. 

The Coordinator will notify the student regarding the result of the 
examinations. The examination papers and/or comments of the examining 

80 



committee will become part of the student's permanent file in the Depart- 
ment, and the student may request a conference with his major professor 
and advisers for the purpose of reviewing the examination papers. 

A student may repeat the Comprehensive Examinations as many times 
as necessary to demonstrate the required level of competence. 

BALANCE OF COURSES 

Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking one half 
of their required courses and one half of their elective courses at each of the 
two colleges. 

Each College offers an almost equal number of courses every quarter. 
Courses to be offered at the two Colleges during the 1978-1979 and 1979- 
1980 academic years are listed below. Other courses are authorized in the 
curriculum and are listed in the following sections on graduate courses in 
history and in political science. These courses may be offered on demand. 

History Courses 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 



HIS 517 


HIS 609 


HIS 681 


HIS 500 


HIS 535 


HIS 641 


HIS 531 


HIS 621 


HIS 695 


HIS 514 


HIS 619 


HIS 662 


HIS 534 


HIS 640 


HIS 669 


HIS 515 


HIS 633 


HIS 690 


HIS 547 


HIS 680 


HIS 690 


HIS 516 






HIS 606 













Political Science Courses 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

POS600 POS624 POS 683 POS 511 POS 546 POS 620 

POS608 POS 625 POS 684 POS 535 POS 605 POS 626 

POS 610 POS 635 POS 690 POS 540 POS 606 POS 691 
POS 616 POS 680 

A guide to the location of the Education courses is in the Education Section of this Bulletin. 

Graduate Courses in History 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is the 
general prerequisite that a student must have completed the equivalent of 
15 hours of undergraduate work in history to become eligible to take 
graduate work for credit toward the Master of Education degree in His- 
tory. 

HISTORY 500. Historical Method. (5-0-5). ASC. Offered each summer. 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research; treats 
problems of investigation, organization, and writing through discussion 
and actual research experience in local history. 

HISTORY 501. Seminar in Georgia History. (5-0-5). SSC. Summer 
1979. 



81 



A research seminar dealing with various aspects of Georgia's past with 
emphasis on original research and writing. 

HISTORY 502. United States: Colonial and Revolutionary. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

A study of the dicoveries of the New World and the settlement and 
growth of the English colonies of North America, the American triumph 
over France in the New World, the drastic change in British colonial policy 
and the rise of American opposition to it, the achievement of independence 
and the establishment of the United States under the Constitution. 

HISTORY 505. Topics in 20th Century U.S. History. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Summer 1979. 

Covering the most recent period in U.S. History, the course emphasizes 
political, economic, and social issues. 

HISTORY 514. United States: Diplomatic History I. (5-0-5). ASC. Fall 
1978. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from colo- 
nial times through the Civil War. 

HISTORY 515. United States: Diplomatic History II. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Winter 1979. 

A continuation of History 514 to the present. 

HISTORY 516. United States: constitutional History. (5-0-5). ASC. 
A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution of the 

United States. 

HISTORY 517. Reform Movements in American History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Offered each Summer. 

A research and readings course designed to acquaint the student with 
the dynamics of American reformism. 

HISTORY 531. History of Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. Winter 1979. 
A survey of the social, cultural, economic, political, religious, and intel- 
lectual history of Latin America from colonial times to present. 

HISTORY 532. The Russian Revolution. (5-0-5). ASC. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes for 
the collapse of Tsarism, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the Bolshevik 
victory in the Russian Civil War. 

HISTORY 534. Contemporary Latin America. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Twentieth century influences that are producing socio-economic unrest 
in much of Latin America. 

HISTORY 535. History of Soviet Foreign Policy. (5-0-5) ASC. Summer 
1979. 

The course reviews historically the development of Soviet Foreign pol- 
icy with West European States, notably Germany, and also with the 



82 






non-European world through 1917-1940, World War II. and Cold War 
phases. Special attention will be given in this last phase to U.S. — Soviet 
rivalry, Soviet relations with other communist states in Eastern Europe, 
China, and with the Third World, and to the recent moves toward detente. 

HISTORY 536. European Diplomatic History. (5-0-5). SSC. Summer 
1978, 1980. 

An intensive study into the origins and development of European diplo- 
macy, the instruments of power, the interrelationship of diplomacy and 
military forces, the limits of national power, economic objectives, and the 
fundamentals of national objectives. Europe's special political and military 
role will be examined, as it applies to Great Britain, France, Germany, 
Russia, Austria, and Spain. 

HISTORY 547. The French Revolution. (5-0-5). SSC. Fall 1978. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
France, w 7 ith emphasis on the impact of the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon upon the major European nations. 

HISTORY 602. United States: Tyler to Lincoln. (5-0-5). SSC. 
An intensive investigation of the social, economic, political, and intellec- 
tual conditions in the United States between 1840 and 1860. 

HISTORY 603. United States: Nineteenth Century Politics. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

A research seminar in the course and development of political move- 
ments in the United States during the Middle Period. 

HISTORY 606. United States: Afro- American History I. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A seminar on the history of ideas, culture ideologies, and institutions 
that influenced Afro-Americans from the colonial period to 1860. 

HISTORY 607. United States: Afro- American History II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A seminar in Afro-American thought and institutions — a continuation 
of History 606. The course critically evaluates Afro-American culture 
during and following the civil war. 

HISTORY 609. History of Afro- American Higher Education. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

The history of Afro- American higher education from the 19th century to 
the present with emphasis on method and philosophy. 

HISTORY 610. United States: Economic History I. (5-0-5). SSC. 
The history, economic ideas, ideologies, practices, and institutions that 
have influenced Americans from the colonial period to 1860. 

HISTORY 611. United States: Economic History II. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Post- 1860 American economic history and institutions that have influ- 
enced Americans from the Civil War to the present. A continuation of 
History 610. 



83 



HISTORY 613. Seminar in the Puritan Ethic. (5-0-5). SSC. 

A study of the evolution and secularization of the Puritan ethic in 
American society. Special emphasis will be given to the theorists who 
created the ethic and to those thinkers who have attempted to humanize it. 

HISTORY 617. Seminar in Pre-1860 Euro-American Reform Move- 
ments. (5-0-5). SSC. 

Problems in Euro- American cultural, religious, intellectual, and institu- 
tional development with special emphasis on cultural nationalism, 
naturalism, Darwinism, romanticism, and humanitarianism. 

HISTORY 619. Studies in American Thought. (5-0-5). ASC. Winter 
1980. 

A reading and research course devoted to the examination of topics in 
the history of American thought. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HISTORY 621. Far East in Modern Times. (5-0-5). SSC. Winter 1979. 

The strategic economic, political, and ideological factors that shape the 
destinies of Far Eastern countries will be critically examined. The political 
actions of the dominant powers of the East, Japan, communist China, and 
India, will be studied as well as those of the lesser nations, such as 
Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Afghanistan, Cam- 
bodia, Laos, and the Vietnams. The interplay of the United States and 
Europe with respect to the economic and political issues affecting the Far 
East will be high-lighted. 

HISTORY 633. Topics in Modern Russian History. (5-0-5). ASC. Spring 
1979. 

Selected topics in 19th and 20th Century Russian intellectual, political, 
economic, and social history. 

HISTORY 640. England: Tudor-Stuart Topics. (5-0-5). SSC. Winter 
1980. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional, and 
religious issues of English history, 1485-1660. Class concentration will be 
directed to selected topics or periods which will be augmented by indepen- 
dent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 641. England: Restoration-Hanoverian Topics. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Spring 1980. 

Designed to cover various political, socio-economic, constitutional and 
religious issues of English history, 1660-1815. Class concentration will be 
directed to selected topics or periods which will be augmented by indepen- 
dent student research outside class. 

HISTORY 645. Studies in Pre-Modern Europe. (5-0-5). ASC. Fall 1979. 

Selected topics in XVI and XVII century European life will be studied. 
Heavy emphasis will be given to independent research and presentations 
by the student. 



84 



HISTORY 650. Topics in Modern European History. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Summer 1978, 1980. 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with emphasis 
upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World Wars. 

HISTORY 670. Topics in Savannah History. (5-0-5). ASC. Summer 
1978. 

A research seminar involving intensive exploration of local history re- 
sources. 

HISTORY 680. Readings in American History. (5-0-5). SSC. Spring 
1979. 

HISTORY 681. Readings in European History. (5-0-5). SSC. Summer 
1979. 

HISTORY 690. Independent Study. (Credit varies). SSC. 
Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 691. Independent Study. (Credit varies). ASC. 
Admission by approval of instructor and the graduate coordinator. 

HISTORY 695. American Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. Fall 1979. 

An extensive survey of the historiographical trends evident in the writ- 
ing of American History with emphasis on major interpretations and the 
influence of major historians. 

HISTORY 696. European Historiography. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Lectures and readings to illustrate the major developments in the study 
of the European past. 

Graduate Courses in Political Science 

In addition to any specifically noted course prerequisites, there is the 
general requirement that a student must have completed the equivalent of 
15 hours of undergraduate work in Political Science to become eligible to 
take graduate work for credit toward the Master of Education degree in 
Political Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 511. American Presidency. (5-0-5). ASC. Of- 
fered each Summer. 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the Presidency, with the 
principal emphasis on the relations of the executive branch w T ith the Con- 
gress and the Court system. Some attention will be given to the evolution 
of the Presidency to its present dominant position in the American political 
process. (Completion of a survey course in American History is desirable.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 530. Seminar in Empirical Political Thought. 
(5-0-5). ASC. 

A course primarily of readings centered on the analysis of the epis- 
temological and methodological foundations of contemporary politicial and 
social science. 

85 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 535. Origins of Totalitarianism. (5-0-5). ASC. 
Fall 1978, Summer 1979. 

An analysis of the socio-psychological bases of modern totalitarian 
movements. Major emphasis will be placed on pre-World War II Nazi 
Germany. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 540. Comparative Political Analysis. (5-0-5). 
ASC. Summer 1978, 1980. 

This course is mainly theoretical. It deals with the various approaches, 
concepts, and methodologies that are being used in the analysis of com- 
parative politics, viz: the traditional aproach (formal-legal), group theory 
of politics, systems analysis, structural-functional analysis, communica- 
tions theory, decision-making theory, game theory, etc. At the same time, 
each approach is examined as it is used in comparing the politics of various 
countries. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 546. Far Eastern Government and Politics. 
(5-0-5). ASC. Fall 1979. 

Description and comparative analysis of the political systems of Com- 
munist China and Japan. Special attention is given to historical develop- 
ment, political institutions and processes, political culture, political sociali- 
zation, and contemporary problems. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 600. Research Methods in Political Science. 
(5-0-5). SSC. Summer 1979. 

This course covers the different methodological approaches to political 
data, data gathering, and data analysis. It also gives an overview of the 
philosophy of science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 603. Public Policy. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Here an analysis is made of the way public policy is made, who influences 
it, and the varied techniques Political Scientist have developed to study it. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 604. Principles of Public Administration. (5-0- 
5). SSC. 

This course is to acquaint the student with the chief concepts, theories, 
ideas and models in Public Administration. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 606. Seminar: Urban Government. (5-0-5). 
ASC. Spring 1979. 

A study of the structure, function, and political processes of city and 
other local governments in the United States. Special attention will be 
given to the workings of city government in the state of Georgia in general 
and to the cities in the Savannah area in particular. Field studies will be 
utilized to gain first-hand knowledge whenever possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 607. Seminar: State Government. (5-0-5). 
ASC. Winter 1980. 

A comparative study of the structure, function and political process of 
state, county and other special government units in the United States. 

86 



Special emphasis will be given to the states of Georgia, Florida, and South 
Carolina. Field studies will be utilized to gain first-hand knowledge 
whenever possible. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 608. Urban Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. Winter 1979. 

This course surveys the theories, the approaches, models, and the 
techniques of political activity in the urban metro areas. In addition, it also 
reviews the proposals and solutions for urban reform. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 610. American Political Parties. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Spring 1979. 

A seminar which will consider the structural-functional nomenclature of 
American political parties as well as make analytical inquiry into their 
growth, development, aims, and primary concerns. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 615. American Supreme Court. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Summer 1980. 

A seminar analyzing the key problems and issues in the judicial process: 
judicial behavior, judicial policy making, judicial biography, and the court 
in the political process. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 616. Black Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. Fall 1979. 
An analysis is made in this course of the areas of specialization in Black 
politics as well as the numerous political activities in the Black community. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 619. American Foreign Policy. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course will span the period from the American Revolution to the 
Vietnamese War. Areas of major interest will be America's early isolation, 
its emergence as an International power, participation in major wars, and 
as a primary force in the United Nations. The course will examine the 
relationship of the United States with the USSR, United Kingdom, Main- 
land China, and other world powers. This study will show the supporting 
roles of the U.S. Military, the CIA, AID, USIA, Peace Corps, and other 
agencies. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 620. Topics in International Relations. (5-0-5). 
ASC. Winter 1979. 

Prerequisite: undergraduate work in the field or permission of the 
instructor. A seminar course with specific titles announced as offered. May 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 621. International Relations: Far East. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

The politics, people, movements and ideologies are surveyed for the 
impact on Asia and the world. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 623. International Relations: Africa. (5-0-5). 
SSC. 

The diplomacy, alliances and internal politics of the Black African coun- 
tries are analyzed and studied for trends and continuities. 



87 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 624. USSR and Red China in Conflict. (5-0-5). 
SSC. Summer 1978, 1980. 

This course will consider and evaluate Chinese and Russian relations 
before and after the 1917 Communist Revolution. The causes of Sino- 
Soviet conflicts will be traced to their economic, political, strategic, and 
ideological sources. The history of the break between the Soviet Union and 
the Peoples Republic of China and the implication of this hiatus for the 
security of the modern world will be critically examined. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 625. Communist China in World Politics. (5-0- 
5). SSC. Summer 1979. 

This course stresses the international role of the Peoples Republic of 
China. The growth of China's Communist element is traced first through 
its tenuous relationship with Nationalist China and then as the successor to 
Nanking. Particular emphasis is given to the changing relations of Red 
China to the USSR, the United States, Japan, and the developing nations 
of Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Communist China's interest in world 
revolution, cultural programs, and insurgencies are examined against its 
break with and distrust of the Soviet Union. Reasons are explored for the 
detente of China with the United States. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 626. Seminar in International Law. (5-0-5). 
ASC. Spring 1980. 

A detailed study of selected topics within the field of International Law; 
emphasis will be on wide reading, written reports and classroom discussion 
and analysis. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 627. International Organizations. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Spring 1980. 

This course will analyze the roles and internal sturctures of the United 
Nations, the Common Market, NATO, the International Court, the 
Orgnaization of American States, the World Bank, and other international 
organizations. Of special interest will be the particular influence of the 
United States in these organizations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 628. Communism, Capitalism, and Chris- 
tianity. (5-0-5). SSC. 

This course is a study of the origins of Communism, Capitalism, and 
Christianity and their interrelationship in the modern world. Students will 
explore the similarities and differences of the three factors in Europe, 
Asia, Africa, and America. The effects of these forces will be studied as 
they impinged on various countries and on such dominant personalities as 
Joseph Stalin, Woodrow Wilson, Sun Yat Sen, De Gaulle, Francisco 
Franco, and John D. Rockefeller. Of special interest in this study will be 
such periods of intense Communist-Capitalistic relationship as the Post- 
World War I period, the epoch of Nazism, the "Cold War," and the 
Russo- American Detente. 



88 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 629. Contemporary Problems in International 
Relations. (5-0-5). SSC. 

An analysis of the major areas of conflict — or cooperation — in the 
international arena is made to highlight trends, patterns and continuities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 630. Modern Ideological Movements. (5-0-5). 
ASC. 

An analysis of the major ideological movements conditioning the mind of 
contemporary man. The course will focus primarily on democratic 
capitalism, and on fascism, socialism, and communism. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 635. Black Political Thought. (5-0-5). SSC. 
Summer 1978. 

A study of the major thinkers in the Black community and the effects of 
their ideas on the concepts of freedom, liberalism, conservatism, state, 
obligation, consent, etc., for the purpose of its intellectual value and 
comparative possibilities. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 642. Latin American Politics. (5-0-5). SSC. 
A survey of the key Latin American countries and their politics is made 
for insight, comparison, and prospects. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 649. Revolutions and Revolutionaries. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 

This course addresses itself to the causes and characteristics of revolu- 
tions, from the American Revolution to the recent social revolution of 
Blacks, women, and minorities. Each major revolution selected will be 
examined concerning the basic reasons for the upheaval, the leadership, 
and the benefits and losses incurred by the revolt. The course will spe- 
cifically treat the French Revolution, the revolutions of 1848, the Risor- 
gimento, the Meiji Restoration, overthrow of the Ching Dynasty, Jose 
Rizal and the Philippines, the Irish problem, Kenyatta and the Mau Mau 
and other revolutions. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 680. Readings in American Government. (5- 
0-5). SSC. Winter 1980. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 681. Readings in American Political Thought. 
(5-0-5). SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 683. Readings in Political Theory. (5-0-5). 

SSC. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 684. Readings in Comparative Politics. (5-0-5). 
SSC. Fall 1978. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 690. Independent Study. (Credit varies). SSC. 
Admission by approval of the instructor and the Graduate Coordinator. 



89 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 691. Independent Study. (Credit varies). 
ASC. 

Admission by approval of the instructor and the Graduate Coordinator. 

MATHEMATICS 

FACULTY 

Mr. J.B. Clemmons, Department Head, (SSC); Dr. Richard M. Sum- 
merville, Department Head, (ASC); Dr. Chi, (ASC); Dr. Englhardt, 
(SSC); Dr. Hansen, (ASC); Dr. Hinkel, (ASC); Dr. A. Houston, (SSC); Dr. 
S. Hudson, (SSC); Dr. Kilhefner, (ASC); Dr. Laska, (ASC); Dr. Munson, 
(ASC); Dr. Netherton, (ASC); and Dr. Shipley, (ASC). 

This Program is no longer active in 1978-1979, and no new students are 
being accepted. 

Coordinator - 1978, Dr. Summerville 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR REMAINING STUDENTS 

Students must complete a sequence of courses which conforms to the following require- 
ments: 

I. Education Courses (20 quarter hours): To include Education 641, 631, 671, and one of the 
following: Education 62 lor 622. 

II. Mathematics Courses (35 quarter hours): To include Mathematics 501, 502, 505, 510, 530, 
and 10 quarter hours of approved courses chosen from the following courses: Mathemat- 
ics 605, 610, 615, 620, 630, 635, 640, 655, 660, 670, 691, and 692. It is strongly recom- 
mended that 501, 502, 505, 510 and 530 be completed before taking other courses. 

III. Elective Courses (5 quarter hours): To be taken in Mathematics, Education or a suitable 
third field with the prior approval of the student's advisers. (Since a course in excep- 
tional children is required for certification, students should take EXC 522 if they have 
not had an appropriate course previously.) 

IV. Balance of Courses. Students will fulfill the balance of courses requirement by taking 
one-half of their courses at each College. A guide to the location of the mathematics 
courses follows: 

Savannah State College Armstrong State College 

MATH 501 MATH 640 MATH 502 MATH 615 

MATH 505 MATH 655 MATH 510 MATH 620 

MATH 594 MATH 670 MATH 530 MATH 630 

MATH 605 MATH 691 MATH 592 MATH 660 

MATH 563 MATH 610 MATH 692 

A guide to the campus location of the Education courses is in the Education Department 
section of of this Bulletin. 



90 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Certain courses in the M.Ed, degree program in mathematics are desig- 
nated as "core" courses because they contain many of the concepts most 
basic and useful to a teacher in junior or senior high school. The core 
courses are Mathematics 501, 502, 505, 510, and 530. 

An integral part of the graduate program is the attainment of the kind of 
comprehensive understanding of these concepts which can be achieved by 
their re-examination in the light of experience and insight obtained from 
the completion of the courses in the program. The mathematics graduate 
faculty also considers that the crystallization of knowledge to be gained 
from remastering fundamental topics with the benefit of a broadened 
viewpoint is of great value. 

Accordingly, each recipient of the Master of Education degree in Math- 
ematics is required to have successfully demonstrated the attainment of 
such knowledge and such understanding on a written comprehensive 
examination. The following regulations govern the administration of the 
comprehensive examination in mathematics. 

1 . Comprehensive E xaminations will be held during the Fall and Spring 
Quarters, on the third Monday of November and April, respectively. 
The coordinator shall notify the students and the Deans for Graduate 
Studies, at least ten days prior to the examination, concerning the 
place and time of day of the examination. 

2. Students must register with the Mathematics Coordinator stating 
their intention to take the Comprehensive Examination. The dead- 
line for registering for the Comprehensive Examination is two 
months before the date of the Examination. The registering students 
will receive within one week of this deadline the list of topics for which 
they will be responsible on the examination. 

3. The Examinations Committee of the Joint Graduate Mathematics 
Faculty will be responsible for constructing exams, administering 
them, grading them, and making recommendations to the Joint 
Graduate Mathematics Faculty concerning success or failure on the 
examinations. The Joint Graduate Mathematics Faculty shall make 
the final decision on success or failure. The result of the examination 
will be reported to the Deans for Graduate Studies within seven days 
after the examination. 

4. The Mathematics Coordinator will notify the examined students on 
the results of the Comprehensive Exams. The examined students 
may request a conference with their faculty advisers for the purpose 
of discussing and reviewing the examination papers. The examina- 
tion papers will remain in the advisement files of the student advisers 
until the end of the subsequent quarter. 



91 



5. Students may repeat the Comprehensive Examination as many times 
as they find necessary to demonstrate the required level of compen- 
tence. 

Some graduate courses in mathematics are still being offered even 
though the degree program is no longer active. These courses are listed 
below. 

MATHEMATICS/EDUCATION 592. Modern Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers. (5-0-5). ASC. (Does not require the GMDT.) 

Content concentration emphasizing the rigor, mathematical language, 
and subject matter to be taught in the elementary shcool. 

MATHEMATICS 594. Statistics for Education and the Social Sciences. 
(5-0-5). SSC. (Does not require the GMDT.) 

Graphic representation and data reduction; measures of central ten- 
dency and variability; distributions; correlation; regression; hypothesis 
testing. Primary emphasis is upon the development of statistical skills 
necessary for the conduct and interpretation of statistical research. 



92 



INDEX 

Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Standing 29 

Adding Courses 29 

Administrative Officers 8 

Admissions, General Requirements 20 

Procedures 24 

Types of 21 

Advisement 25 

Balance of Course 32 

Biology, Graduate Courses in 50 

M.Ed. Degree in 48 

Board of Regents, Members of 6 

Staff of 6 

Business Administation, Graduate Courses in 40 

Master's Degree in 36 

Business Education, Graduate Courses in 46 

M.Ed. Degree in 42 

Candidacy for Degree 32 

CATES Courses 30 

Chemistry, Graduate Courses in 56 

M.Ed. Degree in 54 

Class Regulations 27 

Comprehensive Examination, Requirement for Degree 34 

Course Load 29 

Degree requirements, Summary 31 

Degrees Offered 31 

Dropping Courses 29 

Education, Graduate Gourses in 65 

Programs in 58 

Elementary Education, M.Ed. Degree in 58 

English, Graduate Courses in 75 

M.Ed. Degree in 72 

Exceptional Children, Degree Program in 63 

Graduate Courses in 70 

Faculty 10 

Fees 17 

Financial Assistance 19 

Grades 28 



93 



Graduate Council 9 

Graduate courses, Identification of 27 

Graduate Departments, Heads of 8 

Graduate Program Coordinators 35 

Graduation, Application for 32 

History, Graduate Courses in 81 

M.Ed. Degree in 76 

History of Joint Graduate Studies Program 15 

Housing 18 

Joint Graduate Studies Program, 

Administration of 16 

History of 15 

Organization of 16 

Purpose of 15 

Mathematics, Graduate Courses in 92 

Political Science, Graudate Courses in 85 

M.Ed. Degree in 77 

Probation 29 

Program of Study Advisement Form 25 

Readmission 23 

Refunds of Fees 18 

Registration 26 

Requirements for Master's Degree, General 31 

Residence Requirements for Degree 31 

Residency Requirements Georgia 17 

Second Master's Degree 33 

Special Admission Advisement Form 25 

Special Education, Graduate Courses in 70 

M.Ed. Degree in 63 

Student Responsibilities 25 

Teacher Certification 34 

Time Limitation, Degree Programs 31 

Transfer of Credit 26 

Veterans Benefits 19 

Withdrawal from Classes 

Administrative withdrawals 30 

Student initiated withdrawals 29 



94 



NOTES 



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